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BUSINESS
April 10, 2012 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delphi Financial Group Inc., a Wilmington insurance company, announced Monday a $49 million settlement with stockholders who alleged that the pending $2.7 billion sale of the company to Tokio Marine Holdings Inc. had an unfair premium for Delphi founder Robert Rosenkranz. Shareholders approved the sale, announced Dec. 21, last month. It is expected to close by the end of June. Most shareholders, owners of Class A shares, will receive $43.88 per share, plus a $1 per share special dividend.
FOOD
September 21, 1994 | by Marilyn Anthony, Special to the Daily News
Think back to the first time you ever noticed the bread you were served in a restaurant. Chances are, it caught your attention because someone at the table remarked, "Have some bread. It's hot. " For decades, temperature was the only factor that distinguished one restaurant's bread from another. But today's bread basket is more likely to hold something haute rather than hot. In many places, the familiar plain white has been replaced by fat, herb- studded breadsticks; grilled homemade pita; multi-grain slices; rolls flecked with raisins or bits of olive; jalapeno corn muffins; or focaccias with assorted toppings.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
After five days of window-shopping, the Affordable Care Act marketplace went live Saturday for its second year, sporting a shorter application form and new players, plans, and premium rates. Competition for business is keener this year with UnitedHealthcare and Assurant Health joining ACA veterans Independence Blue Cross and Aetna in the five-county Southeastern Pennsylvania marketplace. UnitedHealthcare also opened for business in New Jersey along with Oscar Health Insurance.
NEWS
August 29, 1989 | BY CHARLES J. DePAULIS
By enacting the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act (CAT) last year, Congress ostentatiously strived to reflect their seemingly conscious exertion of power to legislate just laws, homogenized with human and sincere efforts, by alleviating the awesome intolerable cost of maintaining adequate health care. However, this disguise unravels to expose one of the most vicious, inhumane laws Congress ever passed. The closest comparison to this heinous act was the odious 1986 Tax Reform Act. For starters, CAT does not address long-term custodial nursing home care.
NEWS
September 13, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his speech Wednesday, President Obama outlined a set of health-care goals he supports - including a mandate that everyone have health insurance and the addition of a public health-insurance alternative for the uninsured. But there is no single Obama overhaul bill yet. In varying forms, several of his proposals are included in three measures in the works in Congress: the House tri-committee bill; the Senate HELP (Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions) committee bill; and the Senate Finance Committee bill, still in draft form.
NEWS
January 25, 2003 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
For 50 years, the Philadelphia Trading Post has been a West Philadelphia landmark, buying from and selling to college students, working-class families, and others living in such neighborhoods as Powelton Village and University City. Until her death in April, the driving force behind it was Esther Goodman, who also found time to raise a family that grew up in the business. Her daughter, Gail Arana, still runs the family emporium at 4023-25 Market St. And starting at 8 a.m. today, Goodman's son, Lyle C. Arana, a licensed auctioneer who until now has operated in the Reading-Allentown area, will conduct the first of what he hopes will be monthly or bimonthly auctions.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2014 | By Mark V. Pauly, For The Inquirer
The Obama administration has given employers a reprieve from the mandate that they offer their workers insurance at low employee premiums or pay a penalty. The enforcement is postponed until 2016. But should the mandate ever come back? Even strong supporters of the Affordable Care Act are divided. David Blumenthal, of the Commonwealth Fund, says the mandate on employers is needed to compel them to honor their "shared responsibility" to pay their workers' premiums. Tim Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University and a leading backer and interpreter of the complex ACA rules, says the mandate has too many adverse side effects and should be "repealed and replaced" by something else.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Last year, Jimmy and Angela Clark bought Independence Blue Cross' best-selling silver Proactive plan. For the first time in five years, the Germantown couple had health insurance. And they loved it. Having coverage was especially important to Jimmy Clark, 62, who needs blood tests every six months to track high cholesterol. He also needs a colonoscopy every three years - something that, until last year, he pretty much had to forgo. "I got back on [a plan], and colonoscopies are free," said Clark, who got a clean bill of health.
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | By FREDERIC MURPHY
PHILADELPHIA'S politicians are now engaged in a long-overdue public debate on the level and structure of city taxes. But the ability to have an open and honest discussion of tax levels is being clouded by the numbers used. The mayor talks about $70 million as the cost to the city of a wage-tax cut, while saying that the cut returns only 50 cents a week to the average citizen. We are supposed to see this as a big loss for the city with little gain for its residents. But Mayor Street exaggerates by comparing one week's benefits to five years of tax losses.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
President-elect George Bush may seek to reduce the federal budget deficit by trimming Medicare costs, the Washington Post reported today. It quoted some unidentified Bush advisers and budget experts as saying the new administration would support substantial cuts of between $3.5 billion and $5 billion for fiscal 1990. The Post quoted the experts as saying any suggested cuts, at least initially, were not likely to involve drastic changes in the $80 billion program. Initial cuts would, more likely, be based on the Reagan administration's budget proposal for fiscal 1990 being prepared for submission to Congress, the newspaper reported.
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