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NEWS
August 29, 1989 | BY CHARLES J. DePAULIS
By enacting the Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act (CAT) last year, Congress ostentatiously strived to reflect their seemingly conscious exertion of power to legislate just laws, homogenized with human and sincere efforts, by alleviating the awesome intolerable cost of maintaining adequate health care. However, this disguise unravels to expose one of the most vicious, inhumane laws Congress ever passed. The closest comparison to this heinous act was the odious 1986 Tax Reform Act. For starters, CAT does not address long-term custodial nursing home care.
NEWS
September 13, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In his speech Wednesday, President Obama outlined a set of health-care goals he supports - including a mandate that everyone have health insurance and the addition of a public health-insurance alternative for the uninsured. But there is no single Obama overhaul bill yet. In varying forms, several of his proposals are included in three measures in the works in Congress: the House tri-committee bill; the Senate HELP (Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions) committee bill; and the Senate Finance Committee bill, still in draft form.
NEWS
January 25, 2003 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
For 50 years, the Philadelphia Trading Post has been a West Philadelphia landmark, buying from and selling to college students, working-class families, and others living in such neighborhoods as Powelton Village and University City. Until her death in April, the driving force behind it was Esther Goodman, who also found time to raise a family that grew up in the business. Her daughter, Gail Arana, still runs the family emporium at 4023-25 Market St. And starting at 8 a.m. today, Goodman's son, Lyle C. Arana, a licensed auctioneer who until now has operated in the Reading-Allentown area, will conduct the first of what he hopes will be monthly or bimonthly auctions.
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | By FREDERIC MURPHY
PHILADELPHIA'S politicians are now engaged in a long-overdue public debate on the level and structure of city taxes. But the ability to have an open and honest discussion of tax levels is being clouded by the numbers used. The mayor talks about $70 million as the cost to the city of a wage-tax cut, while saying that the cut returns only 50 cents a week to the average citizen. We are supposed to see this as a big loss for the city with little gain for its residents. But Mayor Street exaggerates by comparing one week's benefits to five years of tax losses.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
President-elect George Bush may seek to reduce the federal budget deficit by trimming Medicare costs, the Washington Post reported today. It quoted some unidentified Bush advisers and budget experts as saying the new administration would support substantial cuts of between $3.5 billion and $5 billion for fiscal 1990. The Post quoted the experts as saying any suggested cuts, at least initially, were not likely to involve drastic changes in the $80 billion program. Initial cuts would, more likely, be based on the Reagan administration's budget proposal for fiscal 1990 being prepared for submission to Congress, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Federal officials on Tuesday shared the most detailed information yet on rates consumers can expect to see when the Affordable Care Act's health insurance exchanges go live next week. The average monthly premium for the lowest-cost "bronze" individual plans will be $229 in Pennsylvania (among the lowest in the nation) and $333 in New Jersey (among the highest), according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tax credits that are expected to apply to most purchasers would substantially lower rates in both states.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Almost two months after its inglorious rollout, the healthcare.gov website appears to be slowly recuperating. But even if it is 80 percent healed by November's end, as some public statements suggest, it likely won't be the promised seamless shopping experience where consumers can compare plans and prices and see if they qualify for premium and cost-sharing subsidies. Several websites have stepped into the breach and are helping consumers unravel the differences among the various health insurance policies.
SPORTS
January 8, 1998 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
The hobby continues to change, and change isn't always good. With change often comes discomfort, and I was thinking that maybe we're not having as much fun in this hobby as we used to. In a recent letter sent along with his membership renewal in the Philadelphia A's Historical Society, Bob Weiss, of Elkins Park, Pa., commented: "Thanks for creating the A's Society, it made the hobby fun again . . . and that's what it's supposed to be. " And...
BUSINESS
March 23, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Profits fell 98 percent last year at Provident Mutual Life Insurance Co., but company officials said yesterday that the decline was in line with expectations. The company has been scaling back in recent years, shedding some of its non-insurance operations to concentrate on its core business. That, coupled with a nearly $6 million dividend increase to policyholders, added up to the huge drop in net income to $22,000 last year from $14.3 million in 1988, according to the firm's annual report.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
D EAR HARRY: I'm in a terrible dilemma over insurance. I am 35 and have recently become a first-time father to a beautiful baby girl. Naturally, the question of life insurance came up. We got seven calls from agents selling life insurance in the month following her birth. We contacted the guy who takes care of our car and homeowner's, and he came back with the statement that long-term disability insurance is more important. He said that death is more traumatic for the other family members, but disability is far more likely.
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