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NEWS
January 10, 1988 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Hundreds of pieces of 18th-century glass have been attributed to Henry William Stiegel, the most romantic figure in the history of early American glass. Stiegel's story is the classic rags to riches tale, which he carried a step beyond a happy ending by going back to rags. Stiegel, a German immigrant, came to America in 1750, married the daughter of a Lancaster County ironmaster, took over the iron business and diversified into glass production. Called "The Baron" by his neighbors, he became wealthy and spent lavishly before he over-expanded, went bankrupt and ended his days in poverty in 1780.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Perhaps you're one of the 5,000 people who volunteered to clean up Germantown Avenue on Sunday as part of the Presidents' Summit for America's Future - and you're wondering what else you might be able to squeeze in between collecting trash, scrubbing graffiti and sweeping dirt. (Then again, maybe you're not a volunteer and your intention is to stay as far away from Germantown Avenue as possible until the dust settles and everybody goes back home.) You should know, if you don't already, that the Avenue is lined with scores of stores, shops and eateries that are as varied as the neighborhoods it runs through.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia company yesterday accused Dun & Bradstreet Inc. of using a "nationwide pattern of fraud" to dupe customers into buying more credit information than they needed. Frank Sussman Co., a wholesale clothing distributor in Old City, charged that Dun & Bradstreet, a New York financial-information services company, "taught" its salesmen how to mislead customers and that it fired those who refused to participate in the alleged scheme. The allegations were contained in a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a lot of mozzarella. More than 600 tons, in fact, worth more than $1.5 million wholesale, say its producers. It was delivered from California in a series of shipments in May and June to a local distributor based in Marlton. But that is about all that Valley Gold, the manufacturer, and Joseph Profaci, the recipient, agree on. Lawyers for both sides spent more than two hours in U.S. District Court in Camden yesterday churning the issues in a breach-of-contract/fraud case based on a civil complaint filed last month by Valley Gold.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Volvo's press propaganda for its redesigned Cross Country model, or XC, leaves the distinct impression that the Swedish automaker originated the concept of basing a sport-utility vehicle on a conventional station wagon. "In the truest sense, the Volvo Cross Country is a very Swedish vehicle, as Swedish as the the SUV concept is American," Volvo says. "The XC creation is Swedishness at its finest: a hybrid product that takes two unique concepts - the wagon and the SUV - and combines them into one vehicle that offers flexibility to meet many different tasks.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1986 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Life is short, fame is fleeting, but your homeowners insurance, at least, can be perpetual. Put down a single deposit today on a perpetual homeowners policy, and in theory you buy a policy that could last through the centuries, much like the insurance companies that offer it. In practice, perpetual policies tend to have a life of about 10 years, often being terminated when the property changes hands. The perpetual aspect is that once the deposit has been paid, the policy continues in effect without any additional payment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Something was out of sorts with "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the gala opening of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts on Thursday. Odd, foreign notes played like unwanted grit amid the inner working of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Harmonies imposed themselves not from the bottom up but from the top down. A musical flu bug? In fact, this was the Igor Stravinsky version - appropriate, since he's one of the festival focal points - that supposedly upset a 1944 Boston audience so much that the composer was arrested (In truth, he was only warned.)
NEWS
May 17, 2009 | By Jay Clarke FOR THE INQUIRER
Cindy Ortega needed a break. "I'm with children all day long," says Ortega, who owns Kids Learning Adventure, a Miami preschool. So she and her husband, Roberto, booked a four-night stay at a luxury, adults-only, all-inclusive resort in Mexico over Valentine's Day weekend. "It was amazing," she says. "I've been to all-inclusives before, but this was completely different. From the minute we entered, there were people tending to us. " The Ortegas stayed at Le Blanc Spa Resort in Cancun, an upscale resort that offers more perks than conventional all-inclusives, which are known more for value than for individualized services.
NEWS
October 31, 2014
THIS YEAR, I'm celebrating 23 years of marriage. In addition to the joy of being wed to my best friend, our relationship has economically lifted my life and that of my nuclear and extended family. Being married has netted results that neither of us could have dreamed of coming from low-income households. And so I readily embrace the findings of a new report that makes the case that the retreat from marriage - especially among lower-income Americans, and the resulting change in family structures - is a major factor contributing to the economic inequality in the U.S. It may seem old-fashioned, but marriage matters.
NEWS
November 7, 2005
THE Daily News reports that "health-care co-pays" are one of three major stumbling blocks in the SEPTA negotiations. This terminology is very confusing, and I fear that SEPTA and the union may be misunderstanding the issue and its real impact. "Co-pays" is not the correct term here. Co-pays are the out-of-pocket payments made by patients when they visit the doctor or have a procedure. Along with "deductibles," "co-pays" represent out-of-pocket costs for specific medical services.
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