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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Something was out of sorts with "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the gala opening of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts on Thursday. Odd, foreign notes played like unwanted grit amid the inner working of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Harmonies imposed themselves not from the bottom up but from the top down. A musical flu bug? In fact, this was the Igor Stravinsky version - appropriate, since he's one of the festival focal points - that supposedly upset a 1944 Boston audience so much that the composer was arrested (In truth, he was only warned.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
COME for the tennis, stay for the fashion show. Venus Williams will present her new line of workout gear, called Strisce, under her EleVen brand during the halftime of the Washington Kastles game against Billie Jean King 's Philadelphia Freedoms tomorrow at Villanova University Pavilion (800 Lancaster Ave., Villanova), where Venus played her first Philly match back in 1997. She says that her line is about being able to express herself on the court. Strisce features yellow stripes, a favorite of Williams' although it's the first time that EleVen has delved into the pattern.
NEWS
May 17, 2009 | By Jay Clarke FOR THE INQUIRER
Cindy Ortega needed a break. "I'm with children all day long," says Ortega, who owns Kids Learning Adventure, a Miami preschool. So she and her husband, Roberto, booked a four-night stay at a luxury, adults-only, all-inclusive resort in Mexico over Valentine's Day weekend. "It was amazing," she says. "I've been to all-inclusives before, but this was completely different. From the minute we entered, there were people tending to us. " The Ortegas stayed at Le Blanc Spa Resort in Cancun, an upscale resort that offers more perks than conventional all-inclusives, which are known more for value than for individualized services.
NEWS
November 7, 2005
THE Daily News reports that "health-care co-pays" are one of three major stumbling blocks in the SEPTA negotiations. This terminology is very confusing, and I fear that SEPTA and the union may be misunderstanding the issue and its real impact. "Co-pays" is not the correct term here. Co-pays are the out-of-pocket payments made by patients when they visit the doctor or have a procedure. Along with "deductibles," "co-pays" represent out-of-pocket costs for specific medical services.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Good news for seniors: The government says Medicare's basic monthly premium will rise less than expected next year, by $3.50 for most. It could be good, too, for President Obama and Democrats struggling for older Americans' votes in a close election. At $99.90 per month, the 2012 Part B premium for outpatient care will be about $7 less than projected as recently as May. The additional money that most seniors will pay works out to about 10 percent of the average Social Security cost-of-living increase they will also be due. Some recently enrolled younger retirees will actually pay less: $99.90 a month, down from $115.40 this year.
NEWS
April 4, 1988
Despite public outcries over grand-theft-level premium costs, automobile insurance companies in Pennsylvania want rate increases - even though as many as 50 percent of Philadelphia drivers choose to be uninsured because the rates are so high. The insurance industry will probably get what it wants because its lobbyists in Harrisburg spend big, pressure hard, and get their way with legislators who care more about campaign funding than ripoffs of their constituents. Allstate wants an average increase of 6.4 percent, which will translate into as much as 23.1 percent in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1987 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Suspecting that some people buying private Medicare supplemental insurance are being overcharged, the state Insurance Department is asking five companies to justify their premium rates. The Insurance Department sent letters to the insurance companies last month giving them until mid-October to present statistics showing their policies pay at least 60 percent of their annual premium dollars back out in claims. Medicare supplemental insurance, commonly referred to as medigap, is designed by private insurers to cover gaps in the federally-funded Medicare policies for people over 65. Federal officials and state insurance regulators nationwide have given medigap increased attention because of the growing market for supplemental coverage as the federal deductible limits increase and the senior population grows.
FOOD
June 29, 1986 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Some restaurants have an exquisite decor going for them. Others rely mainly on their food preparation or a reputation for impeccable service. Then there are a premium few that pay a great deal of attention to all three factors. One restaurant that falls into the all-three classification is Il Gallo Nero. It not only has a decor that allows you to use the word ambiance without fear of affectation, but its food shows thought, skill and an artful flair. Service is generally attentive, but in a natural, unobtrusive way. OK, so our bread at an evening meal was inexcusably dry. And there was an absence of bread-and-butter plates that should not have gone unnoticed.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1991 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Higher premiums, higher deductibles and more limits on coverage have made medical insurance far more costly to workers and an uncertain ally in times of illness. Across the nation, insurance costs are rising for working people and their families as employers shift a larger share of the growing expense of health care to their employees. Although employers still shield most workers from the full brunt of health- care costs, "I think the middle class is really feeling pinched," said Donald White, a spokesman for the Health Insurance Association of America, which represents insurance underwriters.
LIVING
September 21, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Major two-day catalog auctions next weekend will offer a study in the contrasting styles of American furniture and appointments. Both sales will feature items expected to bring five-figure prices. Beginning at 6 p.m. next Friday, Pook & Pook Inc. will offer more than 300 lots of 18th- and 19th-century furniture, art and accessories at the first session of a 900-lot sale that includes Pennsylvania cabinetry, quilts, and other local crafts, as well as furniture from other regions.
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