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Prenatal Care

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NEWS
November 24, 1989
Another $1.4 million has just landed in the lap of people who want more prenatal care for poor Philadelphians. The Community Maternity Project will hire more counselors and nurses with the money, chipped in by the city Department of Health and nine foundations. It will try to reduce the number of babies who die in infancy, a figure that, for nonwhites, is twice the nation's average. Clearly, it is a well-meaning idea. And just as clearly, anything spent on care before a baby is born saves money later in high-tech hospitalization, retardation services and a host of other areas.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly 9 percent of the babies born in Philadelphia and its Pennsylvania suburbs from 1991 to 1995 weighed five pounds or less, putting them at high risk for serious medical complications and developmental delays. In Philadelphia, there were more than 15,000 such low birth-weight babies, amounting to nearly 12 percent of all newborns in the five-year period. The figures fail to meet the 5 percent national goal set by the U.S. Public Health Service for 2000. To attack the problem, four private managed-care plans will soon begin using a common system to track the prenatal care provided to all poor women on Medicaid in Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware, Chester and Montgomery Counties.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Let's hear it for the MomMobile. After a decade-long decline in prenatal care for pregnant women in Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, the '90s have brought a modest upturn in care. City and state health agencies credit an array of mother-friendly programs - from Philly's roving MomMobile and outreach by dozens of community organizations to more generous Medicaid guidelines - for beginning, at last, to improve the statistics. That's the best part of a generally grim picture.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Pamela J. Podger, Special to The Inquirer
The sounds of strained breathing and a picture of an artificial respirator filled the auditorium of Lankenau Hospital at the inauguration of a prenatal care campaign by the March of Dimes Sept. 26. "Janet was born at 1.5 pounds. Her mother didn't know that getting pregnant was any reason to see a doctor. Janet sees lots of doctors now," goes the soundtrack of one of several television spots advocating prenatal care to be aired on four local television stations. Unlike similar public service announcements in Atlanta and New York, these include a hotline number, 1-800-660-2012, for advice on pregnancy and referral to Delaware Valley community groups.
NEWS
April 19, 1991 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Jeanette Twyman is 29, single, pregnant, on welfare and many miles from the nearest prenatal care for her unborn child. Until two months ago, Twyman, of Atglen, Chester County, could have attended a nearby clinic at the Brandywine Hospital and Trauma Center outside Coatesville. But in February, the center, one of two hospital-based clinics for poor, pregnant women in Chester County shut down. Because the Chester County Hospital is already on patient overload, the only option remaining for women like Twyman in Chester County is the Valley Forge Ob/Gyn, a private practice that treats women on welfare.
NEWS
July 8, 1992 | by Breea Willingham, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joanne Sills contributed to this report
Sometimes the faces defy the statistics. Health Center Six, a city-funded health center with a prenatal clinic, sits on the edge of Northern Liberties, where nearly one-fifth of pregnant women receive no prenatal care. For every 1,000 babies born in 1990, 20 died. Yesterday, 19-year-old Cynthia Reyes of North Philadelphia sat quietly in the center waiting to see a doctor to make sure she and her second child, due next month, were still in good health. She had brought along William, her 22- month-old son, who's healthy today because she sought prenatal care two years ago. "I want to know how my baby's doing," said Reyes, who has been coming to the clinic for six months.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pregnant woman arrives at a hospital's emergency room in labor and is soon to give birth. When asked what health care she received during pregnancy, the woman says she has had none or very little. Her medical chart is marked "unregistered. " That signals not only that the woman did not get prenatal care, but also that her baby's health may be at risk because of it. That scenario is repeated thousands of times each year in Philadelphia. In 1987, the last year for which the city Department of Public Health has statistics, more than 3,000 babies were born to mothers who received no prenatal care or only minimal care late in pregnancy.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Anyone with the most rudimentary information on How Babies Are Made (say, your average third-grader) knows there's a vast difference between contraception and abortion. This does not prevent lunatic anti-abortion crusaders from equating the two. The more sophisticated play dumb. Not only do they want to force their beliefs about abortion on everyone else, they also want to make everyone follow their rules against birth control. So here's a news flash for those who claim to care so deeply for "the babies," even after they're born: Not only is contraception not abortion, it is an integral part of prenatal care.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Laurie Duncan, Los Angeles Times Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A committee of the National Academy of Sciences yesterday unveiled a proposal to increase prenatal care for an estimated 14.6 million women who lack private health insurance and Medicaid coverage and reduce the number of babies born diseased and handicapped. "Our nation has failed to give adequate priority to the principle that all pregnant women - not only the affluent - should receive prenatal, delivery and postpartum services," said panel chairwoman Joyce C. Lashof at a news conference.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite the wide availability of health-care services in the city, more women than ever are not getting medical care during pregnancy. Nearly one in every eight babies born in Philadelphia in 1987 - 3,352 babies - had mothers who received no prenatal care at all or only minimal care late in pregnancy, according to the latest statistics from the city Department of Public Health. That number represents the highest proportion of women failing to get adequate prenatal care since the city began keeping statistics in 1971.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
The false-positive syphilis test in 2014 spread through Edna Villafane's life like an insidious infection, ruining everything in its wake, she says. Enraged by the news that his pregnant girlfriend of eight years had a sexually transmitted disease, Villafane's boyfriend kicked down her door - which, she says, led to her eviction from her North Philadelphia apartment. Villafane says the stress of being told she had a venereal disease, and of losing both her love and her home, caused her to go into premature labor.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colleen Elwood is Catholic, but she decided weeks ago that the pope's visit and the Sept. 30 due date for her first child were not a good combination. "Religion took a backseat at that moment," she said. Elwood, 32, a public health nurse who lives near 23d and South Streets, thought getting across town this weekend to Pennsylvania Hospital, where she had received all her prenatal care, would be "too hectic. " So on Thursday, she drove to her parents' house in Fort Washington to wait out the craziness.
NEWS
August 5, 2013 | By Allyn Gaestel, For The Inquirer
Seated in a circle, with matching five-month pregnant bellies, a group of women read aloud from crumpled pieces of paper. "When I think about how I was raised, I feel like I need to give my child a better life," one woman said. "When I think about how I was raised, I feel prepared," another said. A heartfelt discussion about the impact that parents have on their children followed. But this is not a simple support group. It is an innovative way of delivering prenatal care that takes women out of the doctor's office and into a group setting where education, emotional support, and physical health intertwine.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
There's a genetic testing revolution underway at your local hospital. And it's causing doctors and medical students to confront some very thorny issues. "Personalized medicine" uses genetic information derived from tests to predict a patient's chances of coming down with diseases and offers ways of tailoring some cures. Could testing on a fetus show that the person has the potential to be autistic? Gay? If so, what will parents do with the information? A product of a $30 billion effort to sequence the human genome, the tests until recently have been limited to those wealthy enough to pay up to $10,000.
NEWS
September 11, 2012
By Erin Cusack, Amal Bass, and Kelsey Bogue A recent Washington Post article revealed a startling loophole in one of the Affordable Care Act's most popular provisions. Even though young adults can now remain on their parents' health plans until age 26, they are not guaranteed coverage for a condition common to young women: pregnancy. Getting pregnancy covered has been a long, arduous process at the state and federal levels. The federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 requires group insurance plans with 15 or more members to provide maternity benefits to employees and spouses, but not dependents - which is how this new loophole arises.
NEWS
April 3, 2012 | BY JOANNE FISCHER
NO WAY can we stop it now. As we mark the two-year anniversary of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and as its opponents are arguing in the Supreme Court, the benefits of the ACA are just beginning to unfold in ways that are critical to families. It is not perfect, but it has already meant a lot for many Americans and will soon mean even more. Yes, I admit, it is personal. Last week I was honored by the White House as a Champion of Change for the work my colleagues and I are doing to educate the community about the ACA. I was intrigued by a suggestion that we should stop using the term "ObamaCare" and insert the names of beneficiaries.
NEWS
November 30, 2011
By Kanani E. Titchen, Esther K. Chung, and Thomas A. Klein If you're a woman of reproductive age in Pennsylvania, you'd better make sure you have health insurance before you get pregnant. And you'd better make sure your insurance covers care related to pregnancy and delivery. In 17 states, including New Jersey, an expectant mother can buy health insurance and get the coverage she needs for herself and her baby. In Pennsylvania, however, pregnancy can be considered a "preexisting condition," meaning a woman can be denied health insurance simply because she is pregnant.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2011
DEAR ABBY : I'm 16 and pregnant. The father of my baby is my stepbrother. It's my fault because I seduced him when we were home alone. Last night my sister said I need to go on a diet because I'm gaining weight, and she joked that I look pregnant. I don't think she has any idea that I really am. I won't be able to hide it much longer. My parents will go crazy, and my stepbrother will be in major trouble even though it isn't really his fault. My mom will not be understanding. Please help.
NEWS
July 14, 2011
By Paul Jablow The news about the new prostate cancer drug came just as I got the "all clear" on my latest screening for the disease. I get a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test regularly despite some controversy about its effectiveness. The test sometimes yields false positives or detects cancers so slow-growing that something else will almost surely kill the patient first. Still, as a healthy man on Medicare, I don't feel guilty about having Uncle Sam pay for it. But the news of the drug gave me pause.
NEWS
March 31, 2011
A new report on children in New Jersey indicates the state is doing some things right to improve the lives of its most vulnerable children. But as teachers like to say to students, there's room for improvement. The findings in the first-ever New Jersey Kids Count Report Card offer a snapshot into the well-being and quality of life of two million children. The report concluded children are doing poorly in seven key areas studied by the Advocates for Children of New Jersey organization, which has added the report card to its annual survey of child welfare.
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