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Preparedness

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NEWS
March 30, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Japan's government admitted yesterday that its safeguards were insufficient to protect a nuclear plant against the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the facility and caused it to spew radiation, and it vowed to overhaul safety standards. The struggle to contain radiation at the Fukushima Daiichi complex has unfolded with near-constant missteps - the latest including three workers drenched with radioactive water despite wearing supposedly waterproof suits. The March 11 tsunami that slammed into Japan's northeast, wiping out towns and killing thousands of people, knocked out power and backup systems at the coastal nuclear power plant.
NEWS
May 21, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
As you probably know by now, this promises to be a hell of a day. Perhaps you've read the newspaper reports or seen the billboards along I-95; or clicked on the CDC's posting, "Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse"; or tuned into Camden's 106.9 FM, one of Family Radio's 150 stations that have been broadcasting warnings for months that the End of Days will occur ... today. Based on revised, painstaking readings of the Bible, and using algorithms he says are derived from God's own word, Harold Camping, 89, an evangelist from Oakland, Calif., has determined that Armageddon will begin at 6 p.m. Philadelphia time.
NEWS
February 23, 2006 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia has hired former President Bill Clinton's Federal Emergency Management Agency director as an emergency-preparedness consultant, paying his firm $1 million to spend six months evaluating the city's procedures for coping with a disaster. At a City Council hearing yesterday, city emergency management director Michael Nucci said James Lee Witt Associates had started work in December and would be assisting a panel that Mayor Street set up last fall to examine the city's ability to handle an event like Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
December 10, 2005 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hurricane Katrina will be Exhibit A for the nation's premier gathering of public-health professionals in Philadelphia next week. Not only will a number of sessions focus on the disaster, but it is the very reason the convention will be held here rather than in New Orleans, where it was originally scheduled. "The overarching problem that this disaster highlighted was communication," said Dr. Kevin Stephens, director of the New Orleans Department of Health, who will be speaking about some of the key public-health lessons that can be drawn from Katrina.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ER was already busy, close to full - gunshots, car wrecks, strokes - when the "get ready" call came in at 9:45 p.m. By 10:30, they began arriving by police car, ambulance, anything. By midnight, 54 had made it to Temple University Hospital, which treated more passengers from Amtrak's Tuesday night disaster than any other emergency room. The most critical patients were rushed into one of the three trauma bays just inside the ER door. Teams of doctors and nurses were assigned to each bay, responsible for stabilizing patients and moving them through with skill and speed, making room for the next.
NEWS
April 1, 1998 | For The Inquirer / SCOTT S. HAMRICK
Gerald Mulville (right), Delaware County's assistant emergency management coordinator, explains the lay of the land to Upper Chichester Police Officer Ken Massey during a training drill using a tabletop model representing the county. The goal: Preparedness for a hazardous spill.
NEWS
May 9, 2006
What else, if anything, do you think government - federal, state or local - should be doing to prepare for a pandemic? How much confidence do you have in government planning and response? Are you making any type of preparedness plan for you and your family? If so, what? Send your thoughts in 200 words or less to: Readers Editor, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia 19101; Fax: 215-854-4483. E-mail: metroletters@phillynews.com. Please put "flu" in the subject line.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
RESCUE missions continued yesterday and power was restored to some of the millions who lost it during what was, according to several measures, an unprecedented storm. It was the kind of weather event, with its combination of rain, snow and wind, that isn't supposed to happen, according to scientists. October tropical-storm systems typically weaken as they move north over cold water and then bend out to sea. This storm was different, in part because the Atlantic Ocean is five degrees warmer than usual for this time of year, meaning that it got farther north than hurricanes usually do. While hurricanes per se aren't caused by global warming, the way Sandy blasted the Northeast and Midwest certainly could have been.
NEWS
June 18, 2002 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The many bridges, rail links and highways in the Philadelphia area are inviting targets for terrorists looking to disrupt commerce and destroy life. That was one of many warnings yesterday at a regional conference on terrorism held at Rutgers University-Camden. The conference brought together about 100 local and national emergency-preparedness experts, law enforcement personnel, medical workers and public-safety officials. "This is a conversation we have to have," Sen. Robert G. Torricelli (D., N.J.)
NEWS
January 4, 2007 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Volunteers in record numbers are planning to focus on community service and emergency preparedness throughout the Philadelphia region for the Martin Luther King Day of Service, officials said yesterday. "We are expecting to have a record 55,000 volunteers working on 600 service projects," Todd Bernstein, the executive director of Philadelphia's King Day of service, said during a news conference at the National Constitution Center. Bernstein said many of the volunteer efforts that will take place Jan. 15 were inspired by the plight of the victims of Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast.
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NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ER was already busy, close to full - gunshots, car wrecks, strokes - when the "get ready" call came in at 9:45 p.m. By 10:30, they began arriving by police car, ambulance, anything. By midnight, 54 had made it to Temple University Hospital, which treated more passengers from Amtrak's Tuesday night disaster than any other emergency room. The most critical patients were rushed into one of the three trauma bays just inside the ER door. Teams of doctors and nurses were assigned to each bay, responsible for stabilizing patients and moving them through with skill and speed, making room for the next.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Jenkins is still thinking about last winter. The 26-year tree-service veteran saw crushed homes, smashed vehicles, and a lot of property damage after February's epic ice storm. "It seems like it took us all year to get everybody cleaned up that had damage in our specific area," said Jenkins, owner of Top Notch Tree Service in Downingtown, Chester County. For the rest of the year, he saw about a 20 percent hike in business from customers looking for preventive tree work, he said.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
ALL ACROSS the country, National Preparedness Month is observed in September, and it's no different in Philly, where the city's Office of Emergency Management runs down its checklist in the untimely event of the "what if?" Mayor Nutter and city safety officials yesterday announced the launch of National Preparedness Month ahead of a preparedness fair outside City Hall. "This part of our effort is vital in increasing the city's response - not only in the city government, but for all our citizens," Nutter said.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid uncertainty over whether Philadelphia schools will open on time, Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. urged principals Monday to prepare for the new school year. When it begins, he said, the district will focus on making sure schools are safe, provide high-quality instruction, nurture students' talents, and foster relationships with families and communities. "We want parents to continue to prepare students for school," Hite told administrators at the district's annual leadership conference, held at Fels High School in Crescentville.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
Edith Lauterbach, 91, the last survivor among the quintet of female flight attendants who in the 1940s organized the first union to fight for equal rights in the sky, has died. She died Feb. 4, according to the Washington-based Association of Flight Attendants-CWA, the successor of that early union. She lived in San Francisco. A United Airlines flight attendant for more than four decades until her retirement in 1986, Ms. Lauterbach saw her profession evolve from one emphasizing youth and beauty to one recognized for its grueling schedule and emergency preparedness.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to student safety, the North Penn School District is cutting-edge, with security staff, emergency drills, camera surveillance, buzzer entry, radios integrated with county dispatch, and a full-time safety coordinator. But many of those measures were in place at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where 20 children and six educators were gunned down in 10 minutes. "We certainly can do more and we are going to do more," said North Penn safe schools coordinator Ray Morris to about 250 parents gathered for a town hall forum Monday night.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dozens of firefighters who arrived at a train derailment in Paulsboro on Nov. 30 knew the toxic chemical vinyl chloride had been released into the atmosphere. But some of the responders say they were equipped with inoperable monitoring devices unable to detect the extent of their chemical exposure. The faulty equipment, those firefighters say, reflected the county's years-long "lackadaisical commitment" to emergency preparedness and led them to resign from Gloucester County's hazardous-materials team days later.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
RESCUE missions continued yesterday and power was restored to some of the millions who lost it during what was, according to several measures, an unprecedented storm. It was the kind of weather event, with its combination of rain, snow and wind, that isn't supposed to happen, according to scientists. October tropical-storm systems typically weaken as they move north over cold water and then bend out to sea. This storm was different, in part because the Atlantic Ocean is five degrees warmer than usual for this time of year, meaning that it got farther north than hurricanes usually do. While hurricanes per se aren't caused by global warming, the way Sandy blasted the Northeast and Midwest certainly could have been.
NEWS
August 30, 2011 | By Annette John-Hall, Inquirer Columnist
Mayor Nutter held a news conference Monday he described as sort of a post-Hurricane Irene wrap-up. He talked about river crests and road openings and the 182,000 Peco subscribers - 2,500 in Philly - still without power (90 percent of service should be restored by Wednesday, Nutter said). But it soon became clear that what the mayor really wanted to do was give his sleep-deprived preparedness team a proud, public, post-Irene pat on the back. From the Office of Emergency Management, police, fire, and the Red Cross all the way to Congress, FEMA, and President Obama, Nutter pointed out that the city's emergency plan was "a textbook example of what interagency coordination is all about.
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