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Preschool Teacher

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NEWS
April 4, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Laura Wills Gaskill, 96, the first preschool teacher at Rancocas Friends School, died Tuesday at Cadbury in Cherry Hill. A Cherry Hill resident for the last seven years, she was born on a farm in Marlton and had been a Mount Laurel resident for more than 50 years. She was a 1918 graduate of Moorestown High School, where she was in the class play and wrote a poem about her classmates who could not be at graduation because they were soldiers in World War I. After graduating from the former Normal School in Ocean City, Mrs. Gaskill began her teaching career in a Medford elementary school, but left teaching to raise a family.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While an upper-class student in the late 1940s at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Margaret McFate met A. Richard Webster on a blind date arranged by his sister, a Shipley classmate. "They met at a train platform, the Bryn Mawr train station," where he had come from his mother's home in Merion, their daughter Beth Stouffer said. "He looked very young, but he was smoking a pipe and trying to appear much older than he was," she said. Webster had dropped out of Amherst College by the time they met and, "right after she had graduated" from Shipley in 1950, "they had gotten a marriage license" and hoped to elope.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009
DEAR ABBY: I am writing about your response to "John in Savannah," the 24-year-old man who is unsure how to explain to people that using a belt to discipline his three little girls is different from abuse. Sometimes, in order to teach that actions or behaviors are inappropriate, some form of punishment, whether it's a spanking or a time-out, becomes necessary. I give my children three chances when they misbehave. If they continue, they are punished. They know that there will be consequences if they do wrong.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Robert H. Werthman of Fairless Hills has been recognized as the 1991 Business Associate of the Year by the Positive Horizons Chapter of the American Business Women's Association. Werthman was honored for his business experience, contributions to the community and sensitivity to women in business, based on letters of recommendation from his co-workers. He has been with Merrill Lynch Inc. in New York City for 22 years, and is vice president and group manager of the data center support group.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise "Neicy" Wendell Moore, 54, of West Philadelphia, a retired teacher, died Tuesday, Jan. 24, of endometrial cancer at Vitas Hospice in South Philadelphia. For 25 years, Mrs. Moore taught fifth graders at several Philadelphia public schools, including Martha Washington School in West Philadelphia and W.B. Bryant School in Southwest Philadelphia. She retired in 2009. During her 17 years at Bryant, she provided classroom instruction to student teachers as a mentor teacher and assisted colleagues with their problems, her husband, Tyrone Steven Moore, said.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sister M. Martha Kopec, 85, supervisor of St. John's Retreat House in Atlantic City for 25 years until retiring in 1994, died Saturday at Atlantic City Medical Center. Born Genowefa Kopec, in Chwalibogowice, Poland, she entered the Congregation of the Little Servant Sisters at Motherhouse in Stara Wies, near Brzozow, Poland, in 1933. After her profession of vows and teacher training, she served as a preschool teacher in Tarnow, and then at Krakow, where she also was a bookkeeper.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The floors are laid. The coat cubbies are in place. And although pint-size furniture is still stacked to the ceiling in some classrooms, the district's $3.6 million effort to create space for its preschoolers is nearly complete. The 12 new classrooms at the Samuel Smith School and the playground around them, all scheduled to open Jan. 13, will be among the first projects completed under New Jersey's plan to modernize or replace aging schools. "It's been a long time coming," said Kelly Ryan, a preschool teacher who was there when Burlington City began tossing around ideas for a permanent home for preschoolers nearly five years ago. The classrooms are needed for the full-day preschool program, which the district expects to grow in enrollment from 188 now to 225 next school year.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By Tamara Chuang, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He had been invited to help start up National Music in the Schools Week. And what a start-up it was. The heavy bass shook the Delaware Avenue School gymnasium as the performer LaJaye', clad in a floppy black beret, black leather combat boots, and sunglasses, brought the crowd of little people to its feet. LaJaye', 30, also known as Jaye Smalls, is a Palmyra native and professional musician who has just released his first single, "Put My Thang Down," on Black Bear Records.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Three days a week, preschool teacher Virginia Joyner takes her act on the road. Armed with a boxload of blocks, toys, paper and crayons, Joyner creates a classroom in the homes of seven youngsters - one at a time. She is part of a one-year pilot program sponsored by Burlington County Head Start. The set-up is designed to give preschool children and their parents who live in remote areas of Burlington County the same benefits available to the 324 children who attend one of the county's three Head Start Centers.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | By Gordon Mayer, Special to The Inquirer
On a recent Friday in a Palmyra classroom, Michael, Amber and Tricia rolled toy bowling balls toward plastic pins that their teacher Denise Cyphers set up each time they knocked the pins down. Zan and Lance played in another corner with blocks and plastic figures shaped like food, while teacher's assistant Georgia Neitzel looked on. In the back of the room, speech and language specialist Lyn Slotkin talked with Jamie over some pictures. These 4-year-olds, with three adults to lead them on, were playing hard, but in preschool, "children's work is play," as Ron Cancelliere put it. The whole idea behind preschool is that while students play, they are learning a variety of basic skills such as body coordination, social skills, and vocabulary and the ability to speak clearly, said Cancelliere, principal of Palmyra's Charles Street middle school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Ryan Morehart thought he had found a field that was both valuable and enjoyable: child care. But as he advanced, he realized there wasn't much advancing to do. He considered going back to school, but that didn't promise enough financial benefit. "I love working with kids," said Morehart, 29, of Philadelphia. But after nine years in early childhood education, he switched to office management. "My benefits are a lot better, the pay is a lot better, I have money left over to the point where we could do stuff," he said.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WORKING as a licensed practical nurse at the former Woman's Hospital in East Falls was a satisfying job for Bernie Willoughby, because Bernie was all about serving others. But after a few years, she decided she wanted a new challenge. She always loved children, and she made up her mind to transfer her affection to teaching. She took on the task of shaping the minds of very young children, preschoolers, who need a loving and caring person in their lives to ready them for the next step in their education.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While an upper-class student in the late 1940s at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Margaret McFate met A. Richard Webster on a blind date arranged by his sister, a Shipley classmate. "They met at a train platform, the Bryn Mawr train station," where he had come from his mother's home in Merion, their daughter Beth Stouffer said. "He looked very young, but he was smoking a pipe and trying to appear much older than he was," she said. Webster had dropped out of Amherst College by the time they met and, "right after she had graduated" from Shipley in 1950, "they had gotten a marriage license" and hoped to elope.
NEWS
September 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU needed a shopping tip or a spiritual jolt, Marcelene H. Johnson was your woman. Marcie, as she was known to family and friends, was always on the lookout for a bargain, and always ready to shoot up a prayer for anyone who needed it. A natural teacher, Marcie was ready to pass along advice on how to save for a rainy day and how to budget personal finances for anyone who asked her for help. And as a "prayer warrior," she worked on the prayer chain of her church, "providing all callers with a word from God," as her family put it. Marcelene Johnson, a longtime teacher of pupils from preschool to first grade, a civic leader in North Philadelphia, an operator of a hair salon and a dedicated churchwoman, died of heart failure Aug. 22. She was 71. In addition to teaching young children in the public schools, Marcie also taught classes in the Deliverance Evangelistic Church Bible Institute.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Denise "Neicy" Wendell Moore, 54, of West Philadelphia, a retired teacher, died Tuesday, Jan. 24, of endometrial cancer at Vitas Hospice in South Philadelphia. For 25 years, Mrs. Moore taught fifth graders at several Philadelphia public schools, including Martha Washington School in West Philadelphia and W.B. Bryant School in Southwest Philadelphia. She retired in 2009. During her 17 years at Bryant, she provided classroom instruction to student teachers as a mentor teacher and assisted colleagues with their problems, her husband, Tyrone Steven Moore, said.
NEWS
April 30, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Jeremy Libon was born without a working left ventricle on May 15, 1991, six doctors surrounded Gail Silverstein's bed at Pennsylvania Hospital to deliver their prognosis. Even with specialized care, they believed, Jeremy would probably never reach age 2. And then, Silverstein said, "they took a picture of him in case he died. " But Jeremy surprised them all. When he died from a stroke Sunday - just shy of 19 - the Lower Merion High School senior's zest for life, infectious smile, and goofy jokes had made him the oil on social waters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2009
DEAR ABBY: I am writing about your response to "John in Savannah," the 24-year-old man who is unsure how to explain to people that using a belt to discipline his three little girls is different from abuse. Sometimes, in order to teach that actions or behaviors are inappropriate, some form of punishment, whether it's a spanking or a time-out, becomes necessary. I give my children three chances when they misbehave. If they continue, they are punished. They know that there will be consequences if they do wrong.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | By Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The floors are laid. The coat cubbies are in place. And although pint-size furniture is still stacked to the ceiling in some classrooms, the district's $3.6 million effort to create space for its preschoolers is nearly complete. The 12 new classrooms at the Samuel Smith School and the playground around them, all scheduled to open Jan. 13, will be among the first projects completed under New Jersey's plan to modernize or replace aging schools. "It's been a long time coming," said Kelly Ryan, a preschool teacher who was there when Burlington City began tossing around ideas for a permanent home for preschoolers nearly five years ago. The classrooms are needed for the full-day preschool program, which the district expects to grow in enrollment from 188 now to 225 next school year.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
In what critics called a violation of a court order, the state Board of Education relaxed the requirements yesterday for people seeking to teach preschool in New Jersey's 30 "special-needs" school districts. State officials said the move was needed to address a shortage of teachers certified under the state's new "P-3" standard, which means they are specially trained to teach children in grades three and below. Under the revised regulation, newly hired preschool teachers in the 30 districts will be allowed to have a general elementary-education certificate, so long as they have taught preschool for two years.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Carmen Gonzalez has worked for seven years at preschools in Camden, first as an aide and now as a teacher with her own classroom of 3-year-olds. Four years ago, Gonzalez started taking education classes at night at Rowan University, and she is close to getting her associate degree. Her employers at Respond Inc., which runs preschools throughout Camden, say she has a knack for working with children. But pretty soon those credentials won't be enough, according to the New Jersey Supreme Court.
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