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Preschoolers

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NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four-year-old Carolyn Smarr put her left hand over her heart during the Pledge of Allegiance. Immediately, her 5-year-old friend gently pushed her left hand down and placed Carolyn's right hand on her chest. Observing this, preschool psychologist Donna Hegstrom smiled. To her, the incident is one more sign of a program that is working. Hegstrom is one of three special-education support staff in the Neshaminy School District's early-intervention program, which provides remediation to developmentally delayed preschool children.
LIVING
May 5, 2006 | By David Kronke LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
Seventy-eight years after he exploded into America's consciousness in "Steamboat Willie," Mickey Mouse is now trying to appeal to an audience that wasn't even born in the same century as he was. Mickey Mouse Clubhouse, debuting today on the Disney Channel (7:30 p.m., then 9 a.m. on Saturdays), is an educational series aimed at preschoolers, designed to help them develop both their math skills and their love of Disney characters. "I've worked with Mickey on previous projects," says the show's executive producer, Bobs Gannaway, before pausing in amusement.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | By Maria Archangelo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five-year-old Annie Clark always said she liked the preschool parties at Smith Memorial Playground better than trips to the apple orchard and the zoo, but not better than snack time. Yesterday she changed her mind. That was because the Philadelphia School District sponsored a celebration of 100 years of kindergarten in Philadelphia that focused on the city's past as seen through the eyes of its future. More than 500 children from the 22 Parent Cooperative Nurseries operated by the city attended the celebration, held at Smith Memorial Playground in Fairmount Park.
LIVING
April 22, 1994 | By Paddy Noyes, FOR THE INQUIRER
"I'm the preacher!" Lamar announces, nabbing the exalted position by yelling first. "I'm the song leader!" Avery chimes in. Turning to the congregation, he raises his hands. The preacher, Bible in hand, and the song leader, hymn book in hand, then belt out their rendition of "This Little Light of Mine - I'm Gonna Let It Shine!" Lamar, 4, and his brother, Avery, 3, are in their living room with an imaginary church flock, but it doesn't detract from their enthusiasm. They throw themselves with great energy into any project, from splashing in a pool or mud puddle to picking strawberries and pulling onions from the garden.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Last year, part of the lower level of Monroe Township's Pfeiffer Community Center was turned over to preschoolers who filled the center with sounds of laughter and ABCs. This September, it's quieter at Pfeiffer. The children are gone. The Monroe Township Pre-School Program that was held at the community center on Blue Bell Road in Williamstown one day a week for the last four or five years has been shut down, at least temporarily, according to officials. Fred White, director of community affairs, said he canceled the session in part because the township could not meet all of the latest requirements of the state Division of Youth and Family Services, which certifies the operation.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2004 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. is reportedly in advanced talks with the Public Broadcasting Service, Sesame Workshop, and Britain's HIT Entertainment to launch a commercial-free, 24-hour digital cable network for preschool children. Officials at Comcast, which would own the largest piece of the proposed network, declined to comment on the report, which was in yesterday's Wall Street Journal. PBS and Sesame Workshop officials also declined to comment. The channel would have rights to such shows as Barney & Friends, Sesame Street, Bob the Builder and Thomas the Tank Engine, among other kiddie brands.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was their first opera performance, but the preschoolers at St. Davids Nursery School in Wayne sang loudly, mostly on key, along with some giggles, for their parents and teachers recently. Wearing hats, suspenders and aprons, 164 children ages 2 to 6 re-enacted the story of a town making a soup out of stones. The performance, called Stone Soup, A Rock Opera, was taught and directed by Debbie Downing, a sophomore at Eastern College. "The original script was for 15 children so I rewrote it and added two original songs called "Grab Your Knees" and "Sorry It's All Gone.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | By Christine Lutton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The last note of the preschoolers' Christmas carols had barely faded when little Maria Bailey started walking into the audience of patients at Buttonwood Hospital. The 4-year-old, whose dark brown ponytail snaked most of the way down the back of her print turtleneck, hesitated only a moment before shaking hands with and then hugging one of the elderly women seated before her. The early December visit to the nearby nursing home and hospital, which are run by Burlington County, has become an annual event for children in the federally funded Good Starts preschool program at the Joseph F. Stackhouse School.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, Special to The Inquirer
Traditional preschool experiences - smooshing Play-Doh, building with blocks, using fingerpaints, socializing - are better for children than an early emphasis on academics, according to a recent study by three Main Line professors. Pushing preschoolers into academics actually may have a negative effect on their development, the study said. The two-year study looked at creativity, anxiety, sociability and academic skills in 120 4-year-olds from middle- and upper-middle-class families attending 11 preschools in suburban Philadelphia and in Delaware.
NEWS
April 20, 1989 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Hundreds of parents of handicapped preschoolers rallied at the Capitol yesterday for an additional $8 million in program funding for next year, and they went away with promises from both Democratic and Republican legislators that they would get it. Now all they have to do is convince Gov. Casey. The parents, organized under a group called Special Needs Alliance of Parents, say early-intervention programs across the state will be curtailed unless the administration agrees to spend $17.58 million instead of the $9.58 million proposed within the Department of Education budget.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
Ryan Morehart thought he had found a field that was both valuable and enjoyable: child care. But as he advanced, he realized there wasn't much advancing to do. He considered going back to school, but that didn't promise enough financial benefit. "I love working with kids," said Morehart, 29, of Philadelphia. But after nine years in early childhood education, he switched to office management. "My benefits are a lot better, the pay is a lot better, I have money left over to the point where we could do stuff," he said.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
A quarter of Philadelphia's residents live in poverty, and too many of its children grow up in dangerous neighborhoods and attend struggling schools. Even after decades of antipoverty efforts and education reforms, these problems persist with maddening certainty. Mayor Kenney's bold plan to provide prekindergarten education in the parts of the city that need it most would give more of the youngest Philadelphians a better chance to succeed. Studies since the 1960s have shown that early-childhood education helps more students graduate from high school, go on to get and keep good jobs, and contribute to their communities.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Andres Plaza loves to hear the littlest ones call him Papa. Mabel Farmer's reward is "to connect with a child and be a supportive part of their life. " And as Barbara Pfeiffer writes in a post on her "Art Aware" blog, there's nothing quite like "seeing a toddler absolutely ecstatic at seeing me. " Plaza, Farmer, and Pfeiffer are among the 82 foster grandparents whom Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center has trained and posted at 21 day-care centers, elementary schools, and other South Jersey facilities.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WORKING as a licensed practical nurse at the former Woman's Hospital in East Falls was a satisfying job for Bernie Willoughby, because Bernie was all about serving others. But after a few years, she decided she wanted a new challenge. She always loved children, and she made up her mind to transfer her affection to teaching. She took on the task of shaping the minds of very young children, preschoolers, who need a loving and caring person in their lives to ready them for the next step in their education.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015
AS A BLACK FATHER, I have the same desires for my children as other parents do. I want my children to adopt the values I'm striving to instill in them, and in doing so, I want them to become self-sufficient, competitive and confident. Those would seem to be simple desires, but one government study after another is showing us that for black children, the most basic rights and freedoms can be elusive. This is especially true in public institutions such as schools and courts. And as a black father, it is heartbreaking to know that my children could be treated differently simply because of the color of their skin.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
While an upper-class student in the late 1940s at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Margaret McFate met A. Richard Webster on a blind date arranged by his sister, a Shipley classmate. "They met at a train platform, the Bryn Mawr train station," where he had come from his mother's home in Merion, their daughter Beth Stouffer said. "He looked very young, but he was smoking a pipe and trying to appear much older than he was," she said. Webster had dropped out of Amherst College by the time they met and, "right after she had graduated" from Shipley in 1950, "they had gotten a marriage license" and hoped to elope.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Pay now, or pay more later. That was the message Gov. Wolf and law enforcement officials delivered Tuesday outside the state prison near Harrisburg to call for more money for early-childhood education, an investment they said has been shown to boost high school graduation rates and reduce the number of people in prisons. "If you want to make Pennsylvania a place where we have safe neighborhoods and people can grow up and have fulfilled lives - and not end up in places like this - then we need to invest in early-childhood education," said Wolf, surrounded by area district attorneys and other law enforcement officials outside the State Correctional Institution at Camp Hill.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new nonprofit, whose leaders include some state heavy-hitters, will launch a three-year campaign this week to expand New Jersey's quality preschool program to children in need throughout the state. Pre-K Our Way will launch its initiative with an informational event Tuesday at the Heldrich Hotel in New Brunswick. Its leadership group includes former Govs. James J. Florio, a Democrat, and Thomas H. Kean, a Republican; former first lady and schoolteacher Lucinda Florio; Cecilia Zalkind, executive director of Advocates for Children of New Jersey; William J. Marino, former chairman and CEO of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey; Douglas L. Kennedy, president and CEO of Peapack-Gladstone Bank; and Lynda Anderson-Towns, superintendent of the Woodbine School District.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EILEEN LABOLITO could rarely make it down a street in Frankford's Northwood section without being stopped by someone she had helped teach as a child. "You taught me when I was a kid," was the typical greeting. "I just wanted to thank you. " And sometimes there would be a knock on her door and there would be a child who had heard that Eileen was ill and wanted to tell her how much she had meant to him or her. "I think she was put on this earth to deal with 4-year-olds," said her husband, Joseph Labolito.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last weekend, the Springfield Township library in Delaware County hosted a screening of the sing-along edition of Frozen , the Disney film in which an ice queen, Elsa, dooms her subjects to eternal frostbite until her younger sister, Anna, steps in to save the day. The children in attendance (including 12 Elsas, two Annas, and a Superman) were spellbound. Amanda Winnett, however, was less than rapt. It was, she said, about the 200th time she had watched the film with her daughter Catherine, a 4-year-old wearing filmy Frozen pajamas and clutching a magic wand that looked deceivingly like a craft-foam snowflake stapled to a Popsicle stick.
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