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Presidential Library

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NEWS
July 3, 2016 | The Associated Press
The New York-based architectural firm that designed the Barnes Foundation Art Museum on the Parkway have been chosen to draw up plans for President Obama's presidential library in Chicago. The Barack Obama Foundation announced Thursday that Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects has been chosen for the library that will be built near the University of Chicago, where the president once taught constitutional law. Besides the Barnes, the married couple behind the firm have designed the David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago and the Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, Calif.
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | Associated Press
The Secret Service has closed an inquiry into an incident in which a 10-year-old Atlantic City boy allegedly telephoned a threat to the Presidential Library of former President George W. Bush near Dallas, Tex. No charges will be filed. Secret Service spokesman Bob Novy said Friday that his agency considers the matter closed. He declined to comment on the content of the call placed earlier this week. Citing "sources," NBC10 said the fifth-grader allegedly left a voicemail message with the library saying he would kill former President Bush.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | BY MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press
ARLINGTON, VA. - The 18 million passengers who travel in and out of the nation's capital through Reagan National Airport each year will now be greeted by a 9-foot tall, nearly $1 million bronze statue of the former president that was unveiled yesterday. The statue is the fourth dedicated by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth. The foundation operates his presidential library. Yesterday's unveiling also gave travelers an opportunity to revisit the dormant debate over whether Reagan was worthy of having his name put on the airport that had long been known simply as "National.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
At last, library for the first president MOUNT VERNON, Va. - It was one of the few things George Washington wanted to do but never got around to: Build a library to hold his official and personal papers. On Thursday, more than 200 years after Washington wrote of the idea, dignitaries broke ground at his Mount Vernon estate on a $47 million presidential library of sorts that they hope will evolve into a "think tank" promoting scholarship about him. The estate hopes the library will house a centralized collection of Washington's papers.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Michael R. Blood, Associated Press
YORBA LINDA, Calif. - For years, Richard Nixon's presidential library was accused of committing another Watergate cover-up. Now, archivists say, the stonewalling is over. The library opened an expanded new exhibit Thursday that scholars say provides a balanced and accurate account of the scandal that brought down a president. "The public deserves nonpartisan, objective presidential libraries," said library director Tim Naftali, who alluded to the original display as "inaccurate and whitewashed.
NEWS
July 21, 1990
The new Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace, just a seven-mile drive from Disneyland, seems to have it all. His parents' tiny house, the gun Elvis gave him, "Pretty Girls for Nixon" buttons and vintage videos such as the "Checkers speech" and Tricia's wedding. Like facilities for other ex-presidents, this one is stuffed with personal and political items that will cheer his fans and might soften some of his detractors (well, maybe one or two). Of course, the facility doesn't really have it all. Because of the awkward circumstances of Mr. Nixon's retirement, his presidential documents - 44 million pages of them - are in federal custody in Alexandria, Va. When the facility's library actually opens next year, it will have copies of the material deemed the most important.
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
HOUSTON - George W. Bush is as hard to find in his father's office as he is in the 2012 presidential contest. The 43d president appears in a gold-framed picture tucked into a far corner of the room, partially hidden by a Texas flag and a cabinet door. The placement, whether intentional or not, is a reminder of the Republican presidential campaign and the lengths to which Romney and his rivals have tried to marginalize the two-term president. The younger Bush was an afterthought Thursday as his father, former President George H.W. Bush, met with current GOP front-runner Mitt Romney - until a reporter raised the issue.
NEWS
January 19, 1993 | By Ellen Warren, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
To all the schemers, corporate officials, book publishers and Kiwanis clubs, President Bush's reply has been the same: I'll get back to you later. Bush has been inundated with offers for jobs, full and part time, for speeches that would make him a lot of money, for book contracts and seats on corporate boards. But to all goes the same form letter saying he is not going to make any decisions until after Inauguration Day - when he will be a former president. "Then I'll figure it out," Bush says.
LIVING
May 29, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yeah, baby. Even as a boy growing up in Canada, Mike Myers always wanted to write and act in comedies. "I liked how the house felt when a good comedy was on," says the star of the forthcoming sequel, Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. "I liked the feeling of a room laughing. My dad was a big laugher. " His father would wake him up in the middle of the night to watch Peter Sellers comedies, he says in the latest Rolling Stone magazine. Myers says Sellers influenced his comedy.
NEWS
October 13, 1986 | By Timothy Dwyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
No, this isn't a monument; monuments are for dead people. And ex- presidents. But at age 62, Jimmy Carter is far from dead, he doesn't golf and he doesn't have to spend the rest of his ex-presidential life going around singing Nixonian redemption songs. So what's an ex-president to do with himself after he leaves the White House - or is shown the door by the voters? Jimmy Carter, ex-peanut farmer, ex-naval officer and currently a part-time carpenter and full-time ex-president, took up a private collection of $25 million and went ahead and built himself a work place on a hillside overlooking the capital of the South.
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NEWS
July 3, 2016 | The Associated Press
The New York-based architectural firm that designed the Barnes Foundation Art Museum on the Parkway have been chosen to draw up plans for President Obama's presidential library in Chicago. The Barack Obama Foundation announced Thursday that Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects has been chosen for the library that will be built near the University of Chicago, where the president once taught constitutional law. Besides the Barnes, the married couple behind the firm have designed the David Logan Center for the Arts at the University of Chicago and the Neurosciences Institute in La Jolla, Calif.
NEWS
October 6, 2012
By Scott Farris On election night in 1896, a friend watched William Jennings Bryan struggling to conceal his disappointment after losing to William McKinley. "It is a terrible thing," the friend wrote, "to look upon a strong man in the pride of youth and see him gather up in his hands the ashes of a great ambition. " Come Nov. 6, either President Obama or Mitt Romney will gather those same ashes. The losing candidate will have received the support of nearly half the nation's voters only to face the question: So what do I do now?
NEWS
August 13, 2012
Unleashing the Economic Growth America Needs By the George W. Bush Institute Edited by Brendan Miniter Crown Business. 329 pp. $26 Reviewed by Joseph N. DiStefano America's long slump began toward the end of the George W. Bush presidency, but the 26 professors, ex-government officials and writers hired by the "policy research arm" of his presidential library in Dallas to write this book are too polite to point that out. ...
NEWS
March 31, 2012 | By Steve Peoples, Associated Press
HOUSTON - George W. Bush is as hard to find in his father's office as he is in the 2012 presidential contest. The 43d president appears in a gold-framed picture tucked into a far corner of the room, partially hidden by a Texas flag and a cabinet door. The placement, whether intentional or not, is a reminder of the Republican presidential campaign and the lengths to which Romney and his rivals have tried to marginalize the two-term president. The younger Bush was an afterthought Thursday as his father, former President George H.W. Bush, met with current GOP front-runner Mitt Romney - until a reporter raised the issue.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | BY MATTHEW BARAKAT, Associated Press
ARLINGTON, VA. - The 18 million passengers who travel in and out of the nation's capital through Reagan National Airport each year will now be greeted by a 9-foot tall, nearly $1 million bronze statue of the former president that was unveiled yesterday. The statue is the fourth dedicated by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation this year to commemorate the 100th anniversary of his birth. The foundation operates his presidential library. Yesterday's unveiling also gave travelers an opportunity to revisit the dormant debate over whether Reagan was worthy of having his name put on the airport that had long been known simply as "National.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
At last, library for the first president MOUNT VERNON, Va. - It was one of the few things George Washington wanted to do but never got around to: Build a library to hold his official and personal papers. On Thursday, more than 200 years after Washington wrote of the idea, dignitaries broke ground at his Mount Vernon estate on a $47 million presidential library of sorts that they hope will evolve into a "think tank" promoting scholarship about him. The estate hopes the library will house a centralized collection of Washington's papers.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Michael R. Blood, Associated Press
YORBA LINDA, Calif. - For years, Richard Nixon's presidential library was accused of committing another Watergate cover-up. Now, archivists say, the stonewalling is over. The library opened an expanded new exhibit Thursday that scholars say provides a balanced and accurate account of the scandal that brought down a president. "The public deserves nonpartisan, objective presidential libraries," said library director Tim Naftali, who alluded to the original display as "inaccurate and whitewashed.
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | Associated Press
The Secret Service has closed an inquiry into an incident in which a 10-year-old Atlantic City boy allegedly telephoned a threat to the Presidential Library of former President George W. Bush near Dallas, Tex. No charges will be filed. Secret Service spokesman Bob Novy said Friday that his agency considers the matter closed. He declined to comment on the content of the call placed earlier this week. Citing "sources," NBC10 said the fifth-grader allegedly left a voicemail message with the library saying he would kill former President Bush.
NEWS
February 15, 2009 | By Julia M. Klein FOR THE INQUIRER
It's all Lincoln, all the time, in this state capital where our 16th president honed his political skills. Along wide boulevards and deco skyscrapers, abundant plaques, tours, and reconstructed 19th-century buildings pay homage to Abraham Lincoln's pre-presidential years. But the biggest draw is the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, which opened in April 2005 and is now headquartering the 2008-10 Lincoln Bicentennial celebration. With more than 1.8 million visitors to date, it is the country's most popular presidential museum - a feat all the more impressive because Springfield (population 111,500)
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Former President Bill Clinton said it was "utterly false" to suggest he pardoned fugitive financier Marc Rich in return for donations to the Clinton presidential library. "The suggestion that I granted the pardons because Mr. Rich's former wife, Denise, made political contributions and contributed to the Clinton library foundation is utterly false," Clinton wrote in an op-ed article for the New York Times' Sunday editions. "There was absolutely no quid pro quo. Indeed, other friends and financial supporters sought pardons in cases, which, after careful consideration based on the information available to me, I determined I could not grant," he said.
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