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Presidential Politics

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NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Manchester Road it is father against son, husband against wife, brother against brother. Few issues could divide the families on this close-knit street in Washington Township. But on the eve of the Democratic National Convention in New York City, one thing has. Presidential politics. As they sit around kitchen tables in their immaculate two-story tract houses, they argue and disagree, good-naturedly, on the subject: In these tough economic times, who should be the nation's next leader?
NEWS
January 28, 1992
Trust levels, comfort levels, whatever you want to call them, are always a big part of the sorting out on the way to the White House. The ball takes crazy bounces: Ed Muskie's tears, Joe Biden's cribbing, Bob Dole's dark flashes of anger. The voter gets bits and pieces. It's hard to assign a weight to each one. The Big Story out of New England over this weekend was in the same tradition, yet somehow more depressing. We refer, of course, to Bill and Hillary Clinton's interrogation on CBS's 60 Minutes, hard on the heels of the Super Bowl.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Most of us have been in the uncomfortable position of being unwilling witnesses to a domestic quarrel. It can happen at a party, with a couple suddenly snapping at each other. Or maybe the pair at the next table in a restaurant, with him snarling and her bursting into tears. Or her snarling and him bursting into tears. Or both snarling and bursting into tears. But who would think we would have to be exposed to this sort of embarrassing stuff in a presidential campaign? I'm referring to the relationship between Mary Matalin, deputy manager of President Bush's campaign, and James Carville, a top strategist in Bill Clinton's campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
On Election Day, 1992, when George Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot were awaiting the results of their respective campaigns - all of which tried to capitalize on a wave of populism across the land - Ivan Reitman and company were in Washington, making a movie. Dave, a political comedy about a lookalike who is recruited to stand-in for the real chief executive, was shooting in the nation's capital with Kevin Kline in the title role, Sigourney Weaver as the first lady and Frank Langella as a Machiavellian White House chief of staff.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | By DAVID S. BRODER
What happened here last Thursday night demonstrates why millionaire publisher Steve Forbes has gone beyond his lavish self-financed television campaign and become a personal force to be reckoned with in Republican presidential politics. Almost 300 people jammed a crossroads restaurant on a foggy winter night to listen to and cheer the political novice from New Jersey, drawn simply by newspaper ads and the word-of-mouth interest in his seemingly quixotic effort to rewrite the tax code and shake up the Washington political establishment.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | By DAVID S. BRODER
Democratic presidential candidates are popping up almost daily, it seems, and the summer columns suggesting that no one would be brave enough to challenge President Bush look pretty silly in retrospect. We should have known: Ambition is the one thing that is never in short supply in our politics. That is the theme of one of the most original and entertaining studies of the current political system to appear this year, Alan Ehrenhalt's book, The United States of Ambition. A longtime writer and editor at Congressional Quarterly, Ehrenhalt was smart enough to realize that most political analysis has been too focused on the makeup of the electorate and the mood of the voters.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | By Jeff Greenfield
The exhibit booths stretched across two cavernous halls at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Some tout futuristic communications gear: satellites, digital editing equipment, computerized graphics. Dozens of others offer "software," or what was called in a more simple time "programming. " They sell everything from wrestling and exercise shows to soft-core pornography to educational and religious fare to entire networks devoted to one subject such as sports, news, movies, fashion, even the weather.
NEWS
March 23, 1988 | By David S. Broder
The superiority of sports to politics never has been clearer - especially to those of us who are fated to cover the latter even though we love the former. Jon Margolis, the top political correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, has had the courage to announce that once the 1988 presidential campaign is over, he is quitting the smoke-filled rooms of politics for the liniment-scented air and stimulating conversation of the baseball, basketball and football locker rooms. He is the envy of all the rest of us, who wish we could write our way onto the sports pages and get out of what we're doing.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He did a great Jack Kennedy, and a lousy Ronald Reagan. He had the George Bush body language, but he didn't nail the voice. And - appropriate for Montgomery County - he looked like a skinny Jon Fox, without the hair. The New York primary is history and it's on to Pennsylvania, but don't think we've left the circus behind. Tom Kolsky - self-proclaimed "Montco court jester," professor of political science and Yakov Smirnoff wannabee - launched the Pennsylvania presidential primary in proper fashion Thursday night with a mix of wit, irreverence and dramatic incompetence.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
What's wrong with the Keystone State? Why hasn't the cradle of liberty been more of a player in presidential politics? All these years. Just one president: James Buchanan, 1857-1861, a Democrat from Republican Lancaster who won by carrying the South because he was soft on slavery. No Pennsylvanian's gotten close since. Arlen Specter's entry into presidential politics makes him the third Pennsylvanian in recent history to look seriously at the office. None, so far, lit up the night.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Organizers hope next month's Northeast Republican Leadership Conference in Philadelphia becomes a stop on the presidential cattle-call circuit. "If you want to be president of the United States, we want you here," said Rob Gleason, chairman of the Pennsylvania GOP. Several hundred conservative activists are expected to descend on the Sheraton Philadelphia Downtown Hotel June 18-20 for sessions on campaign tactics, pep talks from national party...
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer
RIGHT-WING RADIO icon Rush Limbaugh already called New Jersey Gov. Christie "fat" and "a fool" this week - and that was before he found out that the bombastic GOP governor and leading Mitt Romney surrogate would be touring the Jersey Shore side-by-side with conservatives' bete noire President Obama. Now, Wednesday's amazing act of political kabuki theater that marries the feuding presidential camps less than a week before the election is likely to cause heads to explode on the conservative side of the radio dial, and elsewhere.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
EWING, N.J. - He surprised: Praising President Obama one week before an election in which he had raised millions for the Republican opponent. He pounced: Attacking Atlantic City Mayor Lorenzo Langford's alleged defiance of an evacuation order. And he joked: Saying he'd postpone Halloween because, yes, his power is limitless. Sandy may have weakened the coastline and electric grid and infrastructure of New Jersey, but she seemed only to strengthen Gov. Christie. Faced with the biggest disaster of his term, Christie has seized the moment, mashing his tough-guy style and bipartisan tendencies into sound bites that have made him the political voice and face of Hurricane Sandy.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
It would be reassuring to think all the attention being paid to a botched federal gun-trafficking program called "Operation Fast and Furious" was about Brian Terry, the U.S. Border Patrol agent whose death is inextricably linked to that debacle.   Many a fine speech has been made in recent weeks in which Terry's name has been invoked. But in a Congress that can't agree on the time of day without consulting partisan timepieces, the rhetoric has more to do with presidential politics than the slain officer.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Republicans have lost Pennsylvania in the last five presidential elections. Mitt Romney's pollster did not include it on a list of seven crucial battleground states in a PowerPoint presentation for donors last week. And President Obama has solid leads in recent polls here. Some analysts have gone so far as to argue that Pennsylvania should be labeled "light blue" - leaning Democratic - instead of a true swing state. Yet in the early going, both sides are making major moves to contest Pennsylvania, with its 20 electoral votes.
SPORTS
February 13, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Jeremy Lin. Did the mere mention of his name make you smile? Cringe? Shrug? How about Tim Tebow? Now that a few weeks have passed since the Denver quarterback dominated every sports-related conversation, can you hear his name without an immediate smile, cringe, or shrug? The real question for today isn't about your opinions regarding these two out-of-nowhere sports phenoms. The question is why everyone feels the need to have one, and whether that artificial divide between pro- and anti- is ruining our simple enjoyment of sports.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
Mixing an economic appeal with presidential politics, President Obama on Thursday pitched tourism in the Magic Kingdom and mingled with campaign donors in the Big Apple, tending to political concerns with an eye on the forthcoming Republican primaries. "I hope you know that the values you cherish, what you stand for, what you believe in, are the things I cherish and I believe in and I'm willing to fight for," Obama said at Daniel, an exclusive Manhattan restaurant, in the first of four glitzy fund-raisers.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
HARRISBURG - There are races for judgeships and county and municipal offices on the Nov. 8 ballot in Pennsylvania, but the ritual admonition to "focus only on the next election" did not carry much weight Friday night at the fall dinner of the state Republican Party. In the halls of the Harrisburg Hilton, the talk was almost all 2012 presidential politics all the time. Dominating the buzz: internal disagreement over the bold plan by state Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi (R., Delaware)
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
HARRISBURG - There are races for judgeships, county and municipal offices on the Nov. 8 ballot in Pennsylvania, but the ritual admonition to "focus only on the next election" did not carry much weight Friday night at the fall dinner of the state Republican Party. In the halls of the Harrisburg Hilton, the talk was almost all 2012 presidential politics all the time. Dominating the buzz: internal disagreement over the bold plan by state Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi (R., Delaware)
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