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NEWS
July 24, 1986
Pretoria sinks, yet President Reagan lashes U.S. influence to the mast, shouting at the waves. It falls now to the Senate to fashion policy on South Africa, to steer the white regime - such as it can - from the jaws of the storm that apartheid has unleashed on the richly endowed land. It is a sobering business when the President of the United States so badly misreads a crisis so clear and present. In the name of anti-communism, he would coddle tyranny as bleak as any gulag. In the face of the numbers - five million whites presiding over 24 million blacks - he blanches at losing entre with the minority.
NEWS
October 24, 1986 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
The government of South Africa continues to insist it had nothing to do with the plane crash that claimed the life of Samora Machel, the president of neighboring Mozambique. But that's not how the tragedy is being viewed in Zimbabwe, Machel's closest ally among the black-ruled frontline nations of southern Africa. "The press here is reporting that Machel's plane was shot down, and that it was almost surely the work of South Africa," said Julie Fredericks, a highly respected reporter for U.S. National Public Radio, from her base in Zimbabwe's capital city, Harare.
NEWS
July 5, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A bomb exploded outside a crowded supermarket in a white section of Pretoria yesterday, injuring at least 20 people in the fourth bombing in South Africa this week. Elsewhere, thousands of black miners staged strikes or slowdowns that disrupted work at four diamond mines and a huge gold mine in an attempt to win freedom for union leaders detained by the government. In Pretoria, the 5 p.m. supermarket bombing shattered windows, hurling shards of glass through the air and damaging five cars.
NEWS
December 22, 1986
It was barely 50 years ago in Germany that Joseph Goebbels became minister for propaganda and enlightenment. In that capacity he helped orchestrate Hitler's demonic rise and control through his brilliance as a propagandist who ensured that nothing was seen, heard or reported through the media that didn't support his fuhrer's growing political base. With firm control of the press he deftly suppressed the truth, cleverly supplanted a myth, and effectively hid the growing atrocities of National Socialism from the German people and the world.
NEWS
November 5, 1989
In a South Africa that seems suddenly ripe for change, the police have been reined in of late. They've been stripped of their whips, kept discreetly out of sight during major black rallies, even subjected to a little criticism. But they weren't prepared last week for a bit of unplanned glasnost - explosive disclosures by a former black security officer who said he'd murdered anti-apartheid activists for a departmental hit squad. The officer, Butana Nofomela, had been about to hang in an unrelated crime when he blurted his secret.
NEWS
September 25, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
South African has secretly proposed talks with the banned African National Congress, but the ANC has rejected the overtures as a political trick, sources here said yesterday. The reports surfaced at a conference here on "children, repression and the law" in South Africa. Among the 300 delegates are nine members of the ANC executive committee in exile and 120 whites and blacks from South Africa. Although the reports were denied by South African officials and by ANC President Oliver Tambo, they follow a proposal by the government last week for a National Council that would draft a new constitution giving the black majority a role in running the country.
NEWS
December 1, 1989
In a time when history didn't seem to be doing handsprings in Eastern Europe, the events unfolding in South Africa might have been considered astonishing enough to merit undivided world attention. Two months ago, the Pretoria regime seemed as intransigent as its about-to-be-junked leader, P.W. Botha. Today, President F.W. de Klerk keeps coming up with a surprise a day: The whip has been retired; black political rallies have permitted (and not molested); the long-suffering top echelon of the banned African National Congress has been freed (except, that is, Nelson Mandela)
NEWS
August 5, 1991
As they pressed their case to end U.S. sanctions, South Africa's envoys were ever so gracious. They congratulated the victims of apartheid - the nation's overwhelming black majority - for their struggle. They deplored gaps in schooling. They looked forward to a thriving, non-racial South Africa reconnected to its neighbors and the world beyond. They had a warning, though. It went like this: New democracies are fragile. They rely on respect. They need healthy social and economic underpinnings.
NEWS
October 3, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The news was bad last night for supporters of the South African government, particularly for Foreign Minister Roelof F. "Pik" Botha, who had run a controversial last-minute campaign to stave off U.S. economic sanctions. A stony-faced TV announcer reported the U.S. Senate action on the South Africa sanctions bill, telling viewers: "Unfortunately, the President's veto has been rejected by 78 votes to 21. " The state-run television network had carried live coverage from Washington of the final minutes of the Senate vote, which overrode President Reagan's veto of the bill to impose tough economic sanctions against Pretoria.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | By Ken Fireman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Edward J. Perkins, the man nominated yesterday to be U.S. ambassador to South Africa, is described by friends and foes alike as a quiet, cautious team player who is unlikely to make headlines or stray outside the bounds of official U.S. policy. Perkins, who will be the first black American ambassador to serve in Pretoria if confirmed by the Senate, draws praise from State Department colleagues as a consummate professional diplomat who inspires great loyalty from his staff and works hard to understand indigenous cultures.
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NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG - Hospital visitors say Nelson Mandela smiled and nodded Thursday - his 95th birthday - and South Africans celebrated upbeat reports about the former president's health after weeks of worrying that he was on the verge of death. Children sang "Happy Birthday" at school assemblies, and many honored the man known as "the father of the nation" by performing acts of charity for 67 minutes, symbolizing Mandela's 67 years of public service. Outside the Pretoria hospital where Mandela was admitted for a recurring lung infection, well-wishers paid tribute and some received slices of a large birthday cake.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Wandoo Makurdi, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Nelson Mandela has made "dramatic progress," and may be going home "anytime soon," said his daughter Zindzi on the eve of his 95th birthday. "I visited him yesterday, and he was watching television with headphones," said Zindzi Mandela in an interview with Britain's Sky TV. "He gave us a huge smile and raised his hand. . . . He responds with his eyes and his hands. " Mandela is gaining "energy and strength," said his daughter. "I should think he will be going home anytime soon.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
JOHANNESBURG - Nelson Mandela was back in the hospital for the third time in four months Thursday, and the 94-year-old former South African president was reported to be responding well to treatment for a chronic lung infection. South Africa's government said doctors were acting with extreme caution because of the advanced age of the anti-apartheid leader, who has become increasingly frail in recent years. The Nobel Peace Prize laureate was admitted just before midnight to a hospital in Pretoria, the South African capital.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Gerald Imray and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The family of Oscar Pistorius' slain girlfriend wants answers, her mother told a Johannesburg newspaper, as South Africans braced to hear why prosecutors believe a national hero murdered the model. June Steenkamp, Reeva Steenkamp's mother, told the Times in a front-page interview published Monday: "Why? Why my little girl? Why did this happen? Why did he do this?" "Just like that she is gone," the newspaper quoted her as saying in what it described as an emotional telephone interview.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
Magnus Malan, 81, a South African general and defense minister who in the 1980s helped devise and carry out his nation's strategy to preserve its system of racial segregation, died Monday of heart failure in Cape Town. Gen. Malan used the phrase total onslaught to describe threats to apartheid, as the country's racial laws were known. He saw threats from Communists, African countries, and American liberals. His answer was "a total strategy," combining the political, economic, and psychological spheres as well as the military.
SPORTS
June 17, 2010
PRETORIA, South Africa - Join the voice behind Bafana Bafana. These are the life-size words posted throughout Johannesburg, the billboards as frequent as mile markers, displayed on side roads such as Rivonia and highways such as the N1. And so, on a chilly Wednesday evening, joining the voice in its quest against Uruguay seemed right, even natural. An opening-game tie with Mexico had offered South Africa continued hope, had offered the host nation a second chance for victory and, with that victory, a likely pass out of group play and into the knockout stages.
NEWS
May 2, 2010 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
From my mahogany-paneled suite, the vast, craggy infinitude of the Great Karoo - the semidesert that stretches across the center of South Africa - runs to the horizon in all directions. I scan the primordial landscape and can almost imagine roaming dinosaurs and cave walls lined with stick figures. Three thousand years of history have accumulated here and entwined themselves in myth. All thoughts leave my head and the land fills it, and I think I can almost make out the curvature of the Earth itself.
SPORTS
July 7, 2000 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Germany won the right to host the soccer World Cup in 2006 yesterday, edging out an overconfident South Africa, which lost despite last-minute lobbying by former President Nelson Mandela. The executive committee of soccer's world governing body, FIFA, meeting in Zurich, Switzerland, awarded the lucrative World Cup rights to Germany in a 12-11 vote. South Africa had been favored to hold the soccer championship, which would have been the biggest sporting event ever held in Africa.
NEWS
June 21, 1997 | By Gerald Horne
When President Clinton praised the mediation efforts of South African President Nelson Mandela amid the events that led to the dissolution of Zaire and the creation of the Democratic Republic of Congo, this was seen by many as further evidence of a special and warm relationship between the United States and South Africa. Actually, the reality is a bit more complicated. In fact, there is a new scramble for Africa taking place, and Washington and Pretoria are two of the fiercest competitors - though they are not alone in their quest.
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