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Pride And Prejudice

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Hedgerow Theatre honors the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's second published novel, Pride and Prejudice , with Jon Jory's faithful 2006 stage adaptation. While Sense and Sensibility gathers buzz in musical theater circles, Jory, founder of that great American springboard for new work, the Humana Festival of New American Plays, presents a slightly scaled-back, farce-leaning version of Austen's witty stroll among the marriage-minded gentry - landed, tenanted, or landed-aspirant-by-any-means-necessary.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Published 200 years ago in 1813, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice remains one of the best-read novels in the English language, with more than 20 million copies sold. It's also the most filmed of the Austen novels, spawning 10 major films and TV miniseries, including the classic 1940 adaptation starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson with a script cowritten by no less a literary light than Aldous Huxley. " Pride and Prejudice has never been out of print," says Kay Wisniewski, one of the organizers of the Free Library of Philadelphia's daylong literary celebration " Pride and Prejudice at 200" to be held Monday at the Central Library at 19th and Vine Streets.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Two hundred years in the tick of a clock. On Bristol Riverside Theatre's stage, that's how Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice feels in the bicentennial anniversary of its publication. Sure, we have to strip away the class structure, economics, and phenomenon of cousin- and dowry-driven marriage that motivate the five unwed daughters of the Bennet household. And for condensation's sake, writer Jon Jory strips away much of the decorous descriptions and leaves the exposition to narrated passages in which an actor steps forward under a spotlight to relate an exploit, relationship, or bit of gossip.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1996 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
For more than ninescore years, Jane Austen has ranked among the greatest novelists of world literature. So it is gratifying to report that her masterpiece, Pride and Prejudice, has been dramatized in a mini-series that is artful and accurate in its depiction of her subjects, her settings, her characters and her concerns. The six-hour Pride and Prejudice will air in three episodes on the A&E cable channel at 8 tonight and 9 p.m. tomorrow and Tuesday. It easily qualifies as the best mini-series anywhere this season, and deserves rank among the most significant of the decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pity poor Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, fictional parents of five fictional but very real girls. Five daughters will give any parent gray hair or none at all, what with hormones racing though the house, all those clothes, all those rivalries. And all that boy talk. Never mind that the Bennets and their girls' entanglements came on the scene just shy of two centuries ago, in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. And never mind that the rigidity of an unforgiving British class system colors the commonplace Bennets' every aspiration; the girl thing in American culture today comes not by birth, but by ownership - the right shoes, sheets, and shades.
NEWS
February 23, 1997
In the last few years, we've seen an amazing number of literary classics adapted for film and television, notably Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet and Hamlet and Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice, but also The Crucible, Gulliver's Travels, The Scarlet Letter, A Portrait of a Lady . . . the list goes on. Tell us what you think of literary films. We'd especially like to hear from teachers, parents and students on the role of films in education. Teachers: How do films affect your teaching of literature?
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spark of joy lit up the literary and academic worlds this year: It's the bicentennial of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice . Published in 1813, when Austen was 37, Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy's love story has become one of her most beloved novels, having sold an estimated 20 million copies worldwide. Austen's life and work will be celebrated in the region this month with three noteworthy events. The Lantern Theater Company in Center City will host "Regency and Revelry: The Jane Austen Festival," a five-day Austenalia from Friday through Tuesday featuring lectures and readings by experts, performances, and workshops on all issues Austen.
NEWS
March 5, 2006 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a love affair that has swelled and receded like an ocean wave for almost 200 years, and make no mistake, these days the Jane Austen tide is high. Never mind that the author's novels were written in the stilted English of long ago. Austen, who lived from 1775 to 1817 and penned Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and Emma, is proving to be BFF (best friends forever) with the text-message generation. Internet blogs praise Austen's insight, social clubs meet to discuss her work, and thoroughly modern novels (Jane Austen in Boca, The Jane Austen Book Club, and the forthcoming Jane Austen in Scarsdale: Or Love, Death, and the SATs)
NEWS
December 23, 1986
The numbers aren't precise, but an estimated 2,000 Koreans own small businesses in Philadelphia, a success story by any measure. Those businesses are corner groceries, fast-fish counters, laundries - mostly mom-and-pop operations. Though they've opened all over the city, nowhere have they attracted more attention than in some struggling black neighborhoods. They certainly have attracted the attention of WDAS radio personality Georgie Woods who likened Koreans on the air recently to "the new oppressors," suggesting (and here we give Mr. Woods' comments the most charitable interpretation possible)
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NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Two hundred years in the tick of a clock. On Bristol Riverside Theatre's stage, that's how Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice feels in the bicentennial anniversary of its publication. Sure, we have to strip away the class structure, economics, and phenomenon of cousin- and dowry-driven marriage that motivate the five unwed daughters of the Bennet household. And for condensation's sake, writer Jon Jory strips away much of the decorous descriptions and leaves the exposition to narrated passages in which an actor steps forward under a spotlight to relate an exploit, relationship, or bit of gossip.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
A spark of joy lit up the literary and academic worlds this year: It's the bicentennial of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice . Published in 1813, when Austen was 37, Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy's love story has become one of her most beloved novels, having sold an estimated 20 million copies worldwide. Austen's life and work will be celebrated in the region this month with three noteworthy events. The Lantern Theater Company in Center City will host "Regency and Revelry: The Jane Austen Festival," a five-day Austenalia from Friday through Tuesday featuring lectures and readings by experts, performances, and workshops on all issues Austen.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Hedgerow Theatre honors the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's second published novel, Pride and Prejudice , with Jon Jory's faithful 2006 stage adaptation. While Sense and Sensibility gathers buzz in musical theater circles, Jory, founder of that great American springboard for new work, the Humana Festival of New American Plays, presents a slightly scaled-back, farce-leaning version of Austen's witty stroll among the marriage-minded gentry - landed, tenanted, or landed-aspirant-by-any-means-necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
K ATE BILO will return to her post as the weatherwoman of CBS 3's Eyewitness News broadcasts at 5 and 6 p.m. Monday after she went on maternity leave in December, resulting in new bundle of joy Anders . Anders, sometimes called A.J. by Bilo and husband Scott , joins Leo , who turns 3 1/2 soon. Being out of commission for three months has been rough on Bilo. "It's been hard sitting out the winter," she told me. "It's like being on the disabled list. " For a lot of working ladies, maternity leave means an extended period of time off. Little do they know, it's hard to get things done with a newborn babe.
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Published 200 years ago in 1813, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice remains one of the best-read novels in the English language, with more than 20 million copies sold. It's also the most filmed of the Austen novels, spawning 10 major films and TV miniseries, including the classic 1940 adaptation starring Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson with a script cowritten by no less a literary light than Aldous Huxley. " Pride and Prejudice has never been out of print," says Kay Wisniewski, one of the organizers of the Free Library of Philadelphia's daylong literary celebration " Pride and Prejudice at 200" to be held Monday at the Central Library at 19th and Vine Streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Tattle is ashamed that we didn't think of this idea first. British e-publisher Clandestine Classics is releasing sexed-up editions of Sherlock Holmes, Pride and Prejudice and other classics, with erotic passages woven into the traditional texts. That means Mr. Darcy "buried inside the depths" of Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice, and Dr. Watson declared his "joy of knowing other men. " Really? Is that the best they can do? What about the May-December lust-fest between Pip and Miss Havisham?
NEWS
February 5, 2012
By P.D. James Alfred A. Knopf. 291 pp. $25.95 Reviewed by Kenneth Turan Death comes to Pemberley, one of the great houses in Derbyshire, and a most unwelcome guest it is. Not only does the loss of life come at a most inopportune time, the night before the annual Lady Anne's ball, the highlight of the local social season, but it is a most violent and unexpected fatality in the bargain. "He has been bludgeoned," the examining physician says of the victim.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pity poor Mr. and Mrs. Bennet, fictional parents of five fictional but very real girls. Five daughters will give any parent gray hair or none at all, what with hormones racing though the house, all those clothes, all those rivalries. And all that boy talk. Never mind that the Bennets and their girls' entanglements came on the scene just shy of two centuries ago, in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. And never mind that the rigidity of an unforgiving British class system colors the commonplace Bennets' every aspiration; the girl thing in American culture today comes not by birth, but by ownership - the right shoes, sheets, and shades.
NEWS
April 21, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains. So begin the adventures of Jane Austen's beloved monster-whacking, poetry-reciting heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, in Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance - Now With Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem, the latest surefire hit from the doyenne of Regency romances. Jane Austen and zombies? P&P&Z, which debuted this week at No. 3 on the New York Times best-seller list, actually is a satirical concoction by Los Angeles-based screenwriter Seth Grahame-Smith, who used the original Pride and Prejudice as grist for a decidedly bloody, if hilarious, horror mill.
NEWS
March 5, 2006 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is a love affair that has swelled and receded like an ocean wave for almost 200 years, and make no mistake, these days the Jane Austen tide is high. Never mind that the author's novels were written in the stilted English of long ago. Austen, who lived from 1775 to 1817 and penned Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and Emma, is proving to be BFF (best friends forever) with the text-message generation. Internet blogs praise Austen's insight, social clubs meet to discuss her work, and thoroughly modern novels (Jane Austen in Boca, The Jane Austen Book Club, and the forthcoming Jane Austen in Scarsdale: Or Love, Death, and the SATs)
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