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Pridefest

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NEWS
April 25, 2001
It may have been true at one time that John Street had some personal issues with the gay community, but it no longer seems true now. In fact, if there is one area in which the mayor has shown remarkable growth, it has been in his promotion of tolerance in general and gays in his administration, including Alba Martinez, who heads the Department of Human Services. So the criticism he's getting from PrideFest organizers seems particularly unfair. Malcolm Lazin, head of the festival, is blaming Street for the Greater Philadelphia Tourism and Marketing Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest and most comprehensive gay and lesbian festival returns to Philadelphia for five days starting Wednesday. Now in its sixth year, PrideFest will offer seven parties and an eight-hour Sunday festival on 12th Street featuring food, drinks, crafts and music. All told, there will be more than 70 events. But what really separates PrideFest from other gay-pride events is its emphasis on serious symposia, including speakers and panels on religion, journalism, business and other fields.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | By Linda K. Harris, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gay and lesbian people are early adapters. That's the latest in marketing research, according to a panel of experts who gathered yesterday at the Prince Theater to discuss the subject of marketing to the gay community. "If there's a new thing, we do it first," said Stephanie K. Blackwood, who four years ago cofounded Spare Parts, a research, marketing and communications firm in New York. Blackwood said new research shows that gay and lesbian people are not quite as rich as once was thought.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1997 | By Douglas J. Keating,INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Whether Eleanor Roosevelt and Lorena Hickok were lovers or just close friends is a source of disagreement among historians and biographers, but being women of the world, neither probably would be particularly taken aback that the new musical Eleanor & Hick unambiguously treats their relationship as a romance. They might not know quite what to make of the show's having a man play both Eleanor and her husband, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and a woman portray both Hickok and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
There was a time when Jewish mothers were fixing up their sons and daughters for relationships. Now, they're introducing their gay sons to each other. That's what one participant revealed yesterday at a symposium on gay couples during what organizers hope will be the first annual national PrideFest weekend, a celebration of gay and lesbian culture, headquartered at the Holiday Inn at 18th and Market streets. The symposium was one of 40 gay-related events that drew 15,000 to Philadelphia this weekend, featuring art shows, readings, sports, theater and seminars.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Lisa G. Karoly, FOR THE INQUIRER
In its fifth year celebrating the gay community, PrideFest has grown bigger still, creating a festival that would be difficult for even the straightest of people in Center City to ignore. Founder and cochairman Malcolm Lazin sees it as a celebration of diversity - with more than 90 events presented by 70 organizations over five days ending Sunday. "Whatever stereotypes one might have, they can be shown to be ridiculous," said Lazin. "There are religious, sports, family and entertainment events.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ripple of an idea that launched the first PrideFest five years ago has turned into a $2 million wave, the chief organizer of the annual gay and lesbian festival said yesterday. According to daily counts conducted during the event, which began last Wednesday and ended Sunday,, total attendance was between 35,000 and 40,000, said Malcolm Lazin, founder of PrideFest. The visitors spent an average of $50 each, he said. That works out to $2 million spent on food, entertainment, souvenirs and lodging, said Lazin, a lawyer and developer.
LIVING
April 23, 1998 | By Sylvia Colwell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, PrideFest is about parties. Any event that includes a pool relay in which participants hold pink plastic flamingoes aloft as they swim could never be accused of taking itself too seriously. But what PrideFest is really about, says Malcolm Lazin, principal organizer of the Philadelphia gay and lesbian festival and symposium, is drawing attention to the lives of people like Jim Wheeler. Wheeler was a college freshman from Lebanon, Pa., a promising painter and poet who hanged himself last fall because of what Lazin describes as "internal and external homophobia.
NEWS
June 10, 2002
I WANT to write a very special thank you to Dr. Eshag Eshagpour of St. Christopher's Heart Center for Children. Dr. Eshagpour will be leaving St. Christopher's Heart Center and heading for California. I met Dr. Eshagpour 24 years ago when my daughter came under his care for a congenital heart defect. Through three open-heart surgeries, numerous complications and hospitalizations, he was always there, patiently explaining and helping my daughter and me. I don't believe that my daughter would be here today if Dr. Eshagpour had not come into our lives 24 years ago. Thank you, Dr. Eshagpour, from the bottom of my heart.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1995 | By Tom Belden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau and PrideFest, the annual Philadelphia convention for the gay community, have joined forces to try to attract the International Gay Travel Association here for its yearly meeting in 1997. If the bureau and PrideFest succeed, the travel group would bring about 1,100 travel agents, tour operators, hoteliers and others who market to gays and lesbians to Philadelphia May 7-10, 1997, the same days as PrideFest. Travel by gays and lesbians is a significant, growing market, and it would help Philadelphia sell itself if those who make travel decisions are introduced to the city, convention bureau and PrideFest officials said.
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NEWS
September 16, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE CARROLL Park Community Council went out of business in 2012, it broke Joyce Brown's heart. For Joyce and many other members of the tight-knit West Philadelphia neighborhood, the council was the community. The services it provided to the neighborhood could not be duplicated or replaced. "Carroll Park was her passion, the focus of her devotion to serving others," said her daughter, Valerie Kim Johnson. "It was very upsetting to her to lose that. " Joyce Holland Brown, who worked for the Philadelphia Housing Authority and the Tenant Action Group to help people find and keep decent housing, a loyal church woman who was devoted to her family, died Aug. 28 of complications of brain cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2013
BEING GAY used to be a hush-hush thing. Meeting someone at a gay bar one night, you might not speak if you happened to see one another on the street the next day, for fear of being outed. That's the way it was when the Equality Forum began in Philadelphia as PrideFest, back in 1993. Fast-forward to the 21st annual forum, which will be held Thursday through Sunday, and it's safe to say that the forum has come of age right along with the gay-rights movement. At those early PrideFest gatherings, the biggest issues on the Philadelphia-based gay-advocacy mission's radar were workplace and housing discrimination, along with AIDS research.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG ? Gov. Rendell said Tuesday that he was "appalled" and "embarrassed" that his administration's Office of Homeland Security has been tracking and circulating information about legitimate protests by activist groups that do not pose a threat to public safety. Rendell said he did not know that the state Office of Homeland Security had been paying an outside company to track a long list of activists, including groups that oppose drilling in the Marcellus Shale, animal-rights advocates, and peace activists.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG ? Gov. Rendell said Tuesday that he was "appalled" and "embarrassed" that his administration's Office of Homeland Security has been tracking and circulating information about legitimate protests by activist groups that do not pose a threat to public safety. Rendell said he did not know that the state Office of Homeland Security had been paying an outside company to track a long list of activists, including groups that oppose drilling in the Marcellus Shale, animal-rights advocates, and peace activists.
NEWS
April 30, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It began as a block party writ large: a chance for those whom most people called homosexuals to party publicly in a Center City neighborhood they considered theirs and celebrate the beginnings of that openness. Now, a decade and a half later, the straight world has learned "homosexuals" are too diverse to label with one word. They call themselves gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and, often, just people. And the weekend event once known as PrideFest has been formalized into Equality Forum, an international weeklong convention focusing on sexual minorities in society, government and business.
NEWS
September 24, 2004 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County Pride Inc., a gay-oriented nonprofit, has picked Phoenixville for this year's Pridefest Celebration, an event the group hopes will draw at least 1,000 people from the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender communities to the borough Oct. 1 to 3. Organizers said holding the event in the former steel-mill town in northern Chester County demonstrates a new level of tolerance in the suburbs. "They've been very accepting," Chester County Pride chairman and Phoenixville resident Bill Davidson said of local officials yesterday.
NEWS
May 5, 2003 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taking a brief but serious break from an otherwise jocular block party, hundreds of gays and lesbians railed against U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum yesterday afternoon, blasting the third-ranking Republican senator for his controversial remarks on the legal status of homosexuality. "I was shocked by what he said. He forced us into all this," said event coproducer Marion Leary, 25, gesturing to the sign-toting crowd surrounding her. "It's usually just vendors and food and fashion shows.
NEWS
October 10, 2002 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's leading gay-rights group, which grew out of a daylong protest and into one of the largest national symposiums on gay issues, is moving its civil-rights agenda to the international community. The group announced yesterday that it was changing its name from PrideFest America to Equality Forum to reflect the broadened scope of its mission. Malcolm Lazin, executive director of the organization, also announced a partnership for the 2003 international celebration that will feature Germany and take the place of the weeklong PrideFest event next spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2002 | Daily News Staff Report
Expect lots of fun, food and live music Saturday as the Carroll Park Community Council holds its 23rd annual Pridefest in the park at 58th Street and Girard Avenue. But also expect another important element at the festivities - information about health, housing, education and fighting crime. The event runs from noon to 8 p.m. This year's theme is "Recognizing Change Makers. " The council will honor Police Commissioner Sylvester Johnson and Mayor Street for the city's Safe Streets initiative.
NEWS
June 10, 2002
I WANT to write a very special thank you to Dr. Eshag Eshagpour of St. Christopher's Heart Center for Children. Dr. Eshagpour will be leaving St. Christopher's Heart Center and heading for California. I met Dr. Eshagpour 24 years ago when my daughter came under his care for a congenital heart defect. Through three open-heart surgeries, numerous complications and hospitalizations, he was always there, patiently explaining and helping my daughter and me. I don't believe that my daughter would be here today if Dr. Eshagpour had not come into our lives 24 years ago. Thank you, Dr. Eshagpour, from the bottom of my heart.
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