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NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By MICHAEL P. ROSENTHAL and JAMES J. DIAMOND
Virtually all experts say successful health-care reform should include a coordinated system with a balanced physician mix. And that means at least half of the doctors should be primary-care physicians - family physicians, general medicine internists, general pediatricians. This estimate is based on data from countries with less expensive and better organized systems than ours (Canada, Great Britain, Germany) and on successful Health Maintenance Organization models in the United States.
NEWS
March 28, 1994
An interesting factoid entered the health-care debate this past week. It was this: Though cost-cutting is all the rage, the great majority of fourth-year medical students are still headed for careers as high-priced specialists, which in turn drives up the cost of medical care. It also means there's a shortage of primary-care physicians - or so-called generalists. Nowadays, a third of U. S. doctors are generalists; Congress is looking at ways to get the number up to half. So, what would change the students' minds, and nudge them back to the front lines of medicine, the better to dispense ounces of prevention rather than pounds of cure?
BUSINESS
June 15, 1997 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like millions of Americans, Sandy Johnson is looking for the right doctor. But Johnson's search is a little more complicated than most. The 48-year-old Gloucester Township resident has lupus and belongs to an HMO. For 10 years, Johnson says she has struggled with managed care rules limiting referrals to specialists with the experience to treat her immune disorder. Her family doctors have insisted they could take care of her. Johnson is just as insistent they don't have the training or expertise her condition demands.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the contentious issue of access to obstetricians and gynecologists, the Senate's managed-care reform bill offers a right that is essentially moot for most women. They already have more access to ob-gyns than the bill would assure. The Republican-devised bill, which passed the Senate on Thursday, would let pregnant women in federally regulated health plans go directly to obstetricians without first getting permission slips from their primary-care doctors. But women could not go directly to gynecologists except for "routine" care - which could be limited to one annual visit.
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | By Cathleen Egan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the search committee for West Jersey Health System hunted last year to fill the hospital's vacant spot of president and chief executive officer, it looked for someone who could meet three major criteria: work with less funding, diversify into other lines of business such as nursing homes, and find ways to work with the managed-care industry. Rich Miller, who has spent the last nine years at West Jersey - most recently as interim president and CEO - said he could do the job. And the search committee, ruling out three other highly considered applicants from across the country, said the same.
NEWS
March 31, 2010 | By Richard G. Stefanacci
Much of the discussion about the health-care reform legislation just signed into law has focused on the uninsured and the problems of private insurance. But what about a large group of Americans who face none of these issues - namely, those covered by Medicare? While much of the reform will not impact them, there are three areas in which older adults definitely will be affected: prescription drug coverage, managed care, and access to primary-care providers. The impact on those facets of their health care is likely to be good, bad, and potentially ugly.
NEWS
January 29, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
A week ago I received an education concerning a part of the medical care system known as the Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) of New Jersey that proved to be quite an eye opener. What made the whole thing important is that others must also be frustrated by the same inadequate and ineffective treatment. I related the details of my experience in last Saturday's column, explaining how the system failed, first because I happened to be faced with a serious eye problem on the previous Wednesday, the traditional day off for most doctors.
NEWS
July 21, 2009 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A local congresswoman, six hospital executives, and another dozen area health professionals rallied at City Hall yesterday to push hard for health-care reform, reaching a critical stage now in Washington. "We're at a moment that is potentially transformative," said Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, a Democrat representing parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery Counties in Congress. "I think there are real challenges ahead. It's not about being pessimistic or optimistic. It's about getting this done.
NEWS
May 16, 2009 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a year, the first 32 medical practices to sign up for the Rendell administration's chronic-care initiative reported that their diabetic patients were doing better. Forty-four percent of the 15,000 diabetic patients in the program gained ideal control of their blood sugar, up from 33 percent a year ago. Participants say the program works because it gives incentives for caregivers to track patients better and to hire more staff. Over time, proponents hope to see broad health improvements and big savings from fewer hospitalizations and ER visits.
NEWS
September 28, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emily Duffy, a licensed social worker, was walking down the hall of her North Philadelphia clinic last month when she heard crying in Exam Room 3. She opened the door and met Patricia Stone, 26, and her children ages 5, 3, and 2. What happened next illustrates a paradigm shift in mental health care - seamlessly integrating what is known as behavioral health into a primary practice - that is gaining traction nationwide. While the children underwent routine physicals, Duffy learned that the 3-year-old's father had died violently three weeks earlier.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Cindy Schmeltz, medical director of La Comunidad Hispana, recalled the day a homeless woman with diabetes walked into the Kennett Square agency, desperate for help. "She was sleeping on somebody's floor. She was out of insulin, so her diabetes was out of control," Schmeltz said. The woman also was depressed, not only over her chronic illness but also the transience of her life. At that moment, Schmeltz said, she realized that "it didn't matter that I was giving her insulin if she didn't have anywhere to store it, if she didn't have food in her belly, if she didn't know where to sleep that night.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine has been training health-care practitioners. This month, the college formally installed its eighth president, Jay S. Feldstein, an alumnus of the college and a Philadelphia native. He has been in office for more than a year, during which he has developed a five-year strategic plan to help the college grow academically and physically. More than 1,000 students are seeking a doctor of osteopathic medicine degree at the college, where tuition is $45,036 a year.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Independence Blue Cross Foundation will spend $1.5 million over the next three years to improve access to primary care at safety-net health centers in Southeastern Pennsylvania, the organization said Wednesday. The 42 non-profit, privately-funded health centers in the foundation's Blue Safety Net will be eligible for grants to expand access to care through telemedicine and to explore new care models, such as the including behavioral-health services in primary care, the foundation said.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Doctor-patient first Rewarding doctors for the quality - not the quantity - of care they provide is now a national trend, with the growth of accountable care and innovative new models of care, some being nurtured right here in our region ("U.S. health care ailing, but Pa.'s is even sicker," July 26). In Southeastern Pennsylvania, at Tandigm Health, our groundbreaking model is built on a sterling tradition: the trusting relationships between patients and their primary-care doctors.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children had been talking for quite a while about better coordinating medical care and the social-service help so many of their patients in North Philadelphia need. CEO Carolyn Jackson got behind the idea in January 2012 after a young stepfather shot four teens who were involved in a dispute with his children. One of the wounded teens drove with the other three to St. Christopher's. Three of the victims died. "All four of those boys had been cared for at St. Christopher's since birth," Jackson said.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Experts thought if people bought health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, they would find a private doctor and stop using hospital emergency rooms for their primary care. Well, more people have health insurance. But they are still crowding into emergency departments across the nation. An online study by the American College of Emergency Room Physicians found that nearly half of its members have seen a rise in visits since Jan. 1 when ACA coverage began. A resounding 86 percent of the physicians said they expect that number to continue growing.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.) introduced legislation Monday intended to boost the number of primary care physicians, to meet the future needs of veterans and baby boomers. In a news conference at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, he unveiled the Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act, which would remove the cap on the number of federally funded resident training positions at teaching hospitals in the country. Casey cosponsored the bill with 11 other Democrats, including Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.)
NEWS
January 10, 2014
M ASON REINER, 36, and Dr. Randy Robinson, 41, both of Elkins Park, are co-founders and CEO and chief medical officer, respectively, of R-Health. The Center City startup, launched in October, charges a monthly membership fee that enables individuals, employers, unions and small businesses to see primary-care doctors without co-pays or deductibles administered through a health insurer. I spoke with Reiner, who is a Wharton School graduate and serial entrepreneur. Q: Where did you get the money to start the business?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013
BAR and restaurant employees, easily one of the most underinsured groups in the American workforce, have been dealt a holistic hand by a small group of physicians who have made industry health care their priority. Founded in New York City in 2007, by Dr. David Ores - and in Philly since last fall, thanks to South Philly M.D. Bruce Hopper - the Restaurant Worker Referral Program is aggressively focused on the needs of workers "in the biz. " You can gather as much from the nonprofit's logo - serpents intertwined around a fistful of cutlery instead of a staff.
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