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Primary Care Physicians

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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross and DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. on Tuesday announced a new company that would provide services to primary-care physicians in Southeastern Pennsylvania, in another of IBC's efforts to improve care and cut costs. Terms of the deal were not released. The goal of the 50-50 joint venture, called Tandigm Health and based in Philadelphia, is to sign up 300 doctors by the time it starts operating Jan. 1, said Anthony Coletta, an IBC executive who was named president and chief executive of Tandigm.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
We read with interest the two recent articles regarding Philadelphia's plan for a pandemic flu health crisis ("Phila. keeps its flu plan out of sight," May 9, and "Phila. reveals pandemic flu action plan," May 10). The American College of Physicians, an organization that represents 119,000 doctors of internal medicine and is headquartered in Philadelphia, recently addressed the threat of pandemic flu at our annual meeting held in Philadelphia in April. The threat of pandemic flu is very real.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of an advisory health board warned yesterday of impending conflict and confusion as state officials, who are already two months behind schedule, move to provide expanded services for low-income pregnant women. "Potentially this is going to be very chaotic," said Dorothy Mann of the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Mann and other members of the advisory committee for the HealthPass program made the comments during a discussion of Healthy Beginnings Plus, a program designed to provide a wide array of new services to pregnant women.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Temple University Health System said it established an Institute for Population Health to put under one umbrella numerous existing efforts to move health care into the community. Among the programs being moved to the institute is the training of community health workers, who work to reduce readmissions and unnecessary visits to the emergency room, said Paula Stillman, Temple vice president of health care services and director of the institute. A second class of 30 community health workers is scheduled to start training in May. Another program is a Transition Center, which ensures that primary care physicians are notified when one of their patients comes to the ER or is admitted to the hospital, among other things, Stillman said.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By MICHAEL P. ROSENTHAL and JAMES J. DIAMOND
Virtually all experts say successful health-care reform should include a coordinated system with a balanced physician mix. And that means at least half of the doctors should be primary-care physicians - family physicians, general medicine internists, general pediatricians. This estimate is based on data from countries with less expensive and better organized systems than ours (Canada, Great Britain, Germany) and on successful Health Maintenance Organization models in the United States.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
The state will run out of money for the HealthPass program in a little more than a month and state officials say they are trying to find ways to stretch the few remaining dollars as long as possible. Deputy Welfare Secretary Gerald F. Radke said this week that the latest estimates show funding for HealthPass and similar prepaid medical programs for low-income people will run out in March, about four months before the end of the fiscal year. According to department estimates, an additional $60 million in state funds - coupled with $40 million in federal matching funds - will be needed to carry the program till June 30. HealthPass is a demonstration program providing health care to 82,000 low- income residents of South and West Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state has created a "two-tier segregated health system" by setting up an insurance program primarily for nonwhite welfare recipients in South and West Philadelphia, according to the findings of a legislative report released yesterday . State Rep. Vincent Hughes, the Philadelphia Democrat who wrote the report, concluded that the HealthPASS program serving 87,000 poor Philadelphians must either be overhauled or eliminated. Hughes and Rep. David P. Richardson Jr. (D., Phila.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
In his speech to the Democratic convention last week, Bill Clinton eventually turned to President Obama's signature domestic achievement, the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which expands Medicaid coverage to millions of newly eligible patients. That's the good news, if you are poor and lack health care. The bad news is this: If you're a Pennsylvanian who is newly enrolled in the state's Medicaid health-insurance program for the poor, only 2 out of 3 physicians in the state are willing to see you, new research shows.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 750 Philadelphia-area children who came to have their heights, weights, and blood pressures taken on Saturday morning were treated to much more entertainment than a routine visit to a doctor's office might include - face paint, basketball drills with professional coaches, a game show, and a surprise appearance by actor Will Smith. Smith drew cheers from the children who crowded around him at the Healthy Hoops event by reciting the first line of the theme song of his 1990s television show "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" - "In West Philadelphia born and raised.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 1, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
On his first day on the job, David Carrozzino found a note on his desk to make a house call on his way home. More than two decades and thousands of visits later, Carrozzino, a podiatrist, still makes house calls to homebound patients in South Jersey. Carrozzino is among a rare breed in health care these days. A prevalent practice decades ago, home visits by physicians have declined drastically and are more often made today in rural areas. By his count, Carrozzino has made more than 15,700 house calls since that first visit in 1991.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Equip doctors, then get out of the way The experience of Philadelphia physician Andrew Quint is unfortunate ("Getting sick of corporate medicine," July 13). Losing talented, compassionate, experienced doctors is bad for medicine and patients. As a practicing physician for 25 years, I too wanted what's best for my patients but felt constrained by the system as it is today. Yet it doesn't have to be that way. We can preserve independent physician practices and provide doctors with the resources to focus on keeping people well.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Sen. Robert P. Casey (D., Pa.) introduced legislation Monday intended to boost the number of primary care physicians, to meet the future needs of veterans and baby boomers. In a news conference at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, he unveiled the Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act, which would remove the cap on the number of federally funded resident training positions at teaching hospitals in the country. Casey cosponsored the bill with 11 other Democrats, including Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.)
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross and DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. on Tuesday announced a new company that would provide services to primary-care physicians in Southeastern Pennsylvania, in another of IBC's efforts to improve care and cut costs. Terms of the deal were not released. The goal of the 50-50 joint venture, called Tandigm Health and based in Philadelphia, is to sign up 300 doctors by the time it starts operating Jan. 1, said Anthony Coletta, an IBC executive who was named president and chief executive of Tandigm.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot has changed since 1971, when David K. Wagner - trained as a pediatric surgeon and earning $12,000 a year on faculty plus $5.63 an hour moonlighting in the emergency room - started the nation's second training program in emergency medicine at the old Medical College of Pennsylvania. You no longer need to ring a bell for service. Or ride a hearse to the ER, as was common in rural areas. But overcrowding in what are now more professionalized emergency departments is again rampant - and growing - and health care is changing so rapidly that policies can't keep up. Emergency care in Pennsylvania is "in a near-continuous state of crisis," said Charles Barbera, an emergency doctor in Reading and president of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System said it established an Institute for Population Health to put under one umbrella numerous existing efforts to move health care into the community.   Among the programs being moved to the institute is the training of community health workers, who work to reduce readmissions and unnecessary visits to the emergency room, said Paula Stillman, Temple vice president of health care services and director of the institute.   A second class of 30 community health workers is scheduled to start training in May. Another program is a Transition Center, which ensures that primary care physicians are notified when one of their patients comes to the ER or is admitted to the hospital, among other things, Stillman said.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
In his speech to the Democratic convention last week, Bill Clinton eventually turned to President Obama's signature domestic achievement, the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which expands Medicaid coverage to millions of newly eligible patients. That's the good news, if you are poor and lack health care. The bad news is this: If you're a Pennsylvanian who is newly enrolled in the state's Medicaid health-insurance program for the poor, only 2 out of 3 physicians in the state are willing to see you, new research shows.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 750 Philadelphia-area children who came to have their height, weight, and blood pressure taken Saturday morning were treated to much more entertainment than a routine visit to a doctor's office might include - face paint, basketball drills, a game show, and a surprise appearance by Will Smith. Smith drew cheers from the children who crowded around him at the Healthy Hoops event by reciting a line of the theme song of his 1990s television show The Fresh Prince of Bel Air - "In West Philadelphia born and raised.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 750 Philadelphia-area children who came to have their heights, weights, and blood pressures taken on Saturday morning were treated to much more entertainment than a routine visit to a doctor's office might include - face paint, basketball drills with professional coaches, a game show, and a surprise appearance by actor Will Smith. Smith drew cheers from the children who crowded around him at the Healthy Hoops event by reciting the first line of the theme song of his 1990s television show "The Fresh Prince of Bel Air" - "In West Philadelphia born and raised.
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