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Primary Challenge

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NEWS
February 4, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Rep. Peter Vroon of Valley Forge is facing a Republican primary challenge for only the second time since his election in the 157th legislative district 14 years ago. Neither Vroon, who is seeking his eighth term in the state House of Representatives, nor his challenger, Tredyffrin Supervisor Tracy Massey, was able to muster the 60-percent plurality vote required to win the endorsement of the Chester County Republican organization at its...
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | By Geoff Mulvihill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two Democrats yesterday announced their candidacy for the two countywide seats in November's general election, seats held by Republicans for more than a decade. Michael Paston, 33, of Mount Laurel, says he will run for freeholder, and Ken Phillips, 52, of Pemberton Township, will run for sheriff. Freeholder Vincent Farias and Sheriff Gary Daniels, both Republicans, plan to seek re-election. John Hancock and James Lewis have announced they will challenge the GOP incumbents in the June 2 primary.
NEWS
August 4, 2009 | Associated Press
Republican-turned-Democrat U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter will likely face a formal challenge in Pennsylvania's Democratic primary. U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, from Delaware County, a former Navy vice admiral serving his second term in Congress, has scheduled five campaign stops throughout the state today. At the first, at a VFW hall in his district in Folsom, he's expected to announce his candidacy. The announcement would not be a surprise. Sestak, 57, has already heavily campaigned in the state.
SPORTS
May 7, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billy King, general manager of the 76ers, confirmed yesterday that he has been approached by Democrats in Washington about his interest in running for the U.S. Senate next year against Republican incumbent Arlen Specter. Speaking on WIP-AM (610), King said he had discussed the matter last week with officials of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, including its chairman, Sen. Jon Corzine of New Jersey. King, 37, who was named by Sports Illustrated last week as one of the most influential minority figures in American sports, called the attention "flattering" and said he wanted to run for political office at some point.
NEWS
March 3, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Club for Growth president Pat Toomey, a conservative former congressman who nearly unseated Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter in the 2004 Republican primary, says he is considering another shot. That is a reversal of sorts, as Toomey had said in late January that he was forgoing next year's Senate race to focus on a potential candidacy for governor. But yesterday morning, during an appearance on the Bobby Gunther Walsh show on Allentown talk-radio station WAEB 790 AM, Toomey said a possible Senate campaign was "back on the table.
NEWS
April 14, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pat Toomey resigned yesterday as president of the anti-tax Club for Growth, clearing the decks for his expected primary challenge to Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.). The advocacy group said in a statement that Toomey was leaving to "pursue other opportunities. " Former Rep. Chris Chocola (R., Ind.) will be the group's new president. A former congressman from the Lehigh Valley, Toomey has been acting like a Senate candidate for weeks, traveling the state and criticizing Specter's recent votes in favor of federal economic-stimulus and bailout spending.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - Freshly acquitted Atlantic City Councilman Marty Small is running for reelection. But he'll have to overcome a primary challenge in June. Last month, Small and five codefendants were acquitted of voter fraud involving his unsuccessful 2009 mayoral campaign. It was the second time in five years he was acquitted on those charges. His previous trial involved a mayoral election in which he was not a candidate. Small, 37, says people in Atlantic City know he is not corrupt and predicts the trial will not be a factor.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With three congressmen retiring and with pollsters predicting the ouster of other incumbents by angry voters, high drama could accompany New Jersey's congressional elections in November. But not yesterday. Not in South Jersey, at least, where the state's ho-hum primary offered no surprises in congressional races. The only incumbent who faced a primary challenge won an easy victory, while other expected winners also prevailed. A light turnout of voters chose candidates in 15 contested races in 11 of the state's congressional districts.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News staff writer Gar Joseph contributed to this report
Outgoing state Attorney General Thomas W. Corbett Jr. won't run for the state Supreme Court this year, but says he'll decide soon whether to challenge U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter in the 1998 Republican primary. Corbett, in an interview before leaving office Tuesday, said that an open seat on the state high court held no appeal for him but that fellow Republicans were encouraging him to challenge Specter. "In the course of the last year, people, particularly in the southeast, have been asking me to take a look at it and offering to back me," Corbett said.
NEWS
May 21, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
The district attorney's office received more than four times as many complaints of balloting irregularities yesterday as during last year's primary, some requiring further investigation, a spokesman said last night. "A lot of these complaints are polling-place bickering and that is supposed to be typical of committeeman elections," said the spokesman, Charles Cunningham. About 4,000 committee races also were on the primary ballot, along with major contests like governor. Cunningham said the complaints were "spread throughout the city, one here, two there," and Frederick L. Voigt, executive-secretary of the Committee of Seventy, a political watchdog group, said the alleged irregularities did not appear to be "part of a pattern or conspiracy.
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NEWS
May 21, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
STATE SEN. LeAnna Washington has plenty of challenges today. Two Democrats are seeking to derail Washington's bid for re-election to the 4th District seat while she fights felony corruption charges filed in March. Pile on another challenge. Washington's former chief of staff is suing her, claiming she wrongfully terminated and defamed him while violating the state's Whistleblower Law. Sean McCray, who also sued the Senate Democratic Caucus, was a grand jury witness in an investigation by the state Attorney General's Office that resulted in Washington being charged with two felonies on March 12. McCray repeats in his lawsuit, filed Friday in Montgomery County, the raging response he said Washington gave when he repeatedly told her to stop using state tax dollars to fund an annual political fundraiser that doubled as her lavish birthday party.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Ken Thomas and Erica Werner, Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Calif. - This is no 2008, when money seemed to fall from the sky for a young senator named Barack Obama. In theory, fund-raising should be even easier this time for the Democrat who shattered money records in his first White House campaign. He's the president now, with an unparalleled bullhorn and reach. But his title isn't all that's changed. The economy is sickly, and he's in charge. That's not only threatening his reelection; it's also making it more difficult to inspire people to open their checkbooks for his campaign.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - Freshly acquitted Atlantic City Councilman Marty Small is running for reelection. But he'll have to overcome a primary challenge in June. Last month, Small and five codefendants were acquitted of voter fraud involving his unsuccessful 2009 mayoral campaign. It was the second time in five years he was acquitted on those charges. His previous trial involved a mayoral election in which he was not a candidate. Small, 37, says people in Atlantic City know he is not corrupt and predicts the trial will not be a factor.
NEWS
October 18, 2010
Two years ago, The Inquirer endorsed Dale Glading for Congress, largely because Rep. Rob Andrews had broken his promise not to run for reelection if he lost a bid for U.S. Senate. Back then, Glading came across as a moderate Republican, though we didn't agree with him on all of the issues. He was the best GOP candidate to emerge in the heavily Democratic First Congressional District in years. Flash forward to 2010, and Glading and Andrews now face each other for a second round, with Andrews seeking a 12th term.
NEWS
June 4, 2010 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's White House found itself on the defensive Thursday over backroom efforts to intervene in the Colorado Senate primary even as fallout continued from its attempt to nudge Rep. Joe Sestak out of the Pennsylvania Senate race. White House officials confirmed they had explored the possibility of an administration job for Andrew Romanoff, the former speaker of the Colorado House, if he would abandon his challenge to Sen. Michael Bennet in the Democratic primary there. The move was essentially similar to unsuccessful overtures the White House made to persuade Sestak to drop out of the primary against Sen. Arlen Specter.
NEWS
January 4, 2010 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
PENNSYLVANIA'S race for the U.S. Senate already has attracted the national political microscope, and that attention is sure to spread to the primary and general elections for governor. As a result, the candidates seeking to replace Gov. Rendell may spend as much time talking about national issues like health-care reform, financial oversight for Wall Street and climate change as they will on statewide topics. Attorney General Tom Corbett, the front-runner in the GOP primary for governor, took the national plunge last week on health-care reform.
NEWS
August 5, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. Arlen Specter thought he was avoiding the primary from hell when he left the Republican Party three months ago, only to find a stiff challenge awaiting him in the Democratic contest from a former Navy admiral with a golden resume. U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, addressing cheering supporters in Folsom, made it official yesterday, vowing to bring "change and accountability" to the Washington insiders who he said had let down the nation. The announcement was long-anticipated after weeks of Sestak's attacks on Specter, a GOP senator for 28 years, as an unreliable Democrat who was about to be handed the party's nomination by the White House and Gov. Rendell for expediency's sake.
NEWS
August 4, 2009 | Associated Press
Republican-turned-Democrat U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter will likely face a formal challenge in Pennsylvania's Democratic primary. U.S. Rep. Joe Sestak, from Delaware County, a former Navy vice admiral serving his second term in Congress, has scheduled five campaign stops throughout the state today. At the first, at a VFW hall in his district in Folsom, he's expected to announce his candidacy. The announcement would not be a surprise. Sestak, 57, has already heavily campaigned in the state.
NEWS
April 14, 2009 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pat Toomey resigned yesterday as president of the anti-tax Club for Growth, clearing the decks for his expected primary challenge to Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.). The advocacy group said in a statement that Toomey was leaving to "pursue other opportunities. " Former Rep. Chris Chocola (R., Ind.) will be the group's new president. A former congressman from the Lehigh Valley, Toomey has been acting like a Senate candidate for weeks, traveling the state and criticizing Specter's recent votes in favor of federal economic-stimulus and bailout spending.
NEWS
April 7, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dana Redd, the New Jersey state senator and Camden councilwoman who has been endorsed by the Democratic Party in her bid to become the city's mayor, will face two challengers in the June 2 Democratic primary. Eulisis Delgado, a perennial City Council candidate, and Elton Custis also will seek the nomination, according to filings made at the city clerk's office by yesterday's deadline. There are no Republican primary candidates, though a number of independents have announced plans to run in November, including education activist Angel Cordero, former city official Roberto Feliz, and Mujiba Parker, who until recently was in charge of distributing state recovery money to Camden.
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