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Primary Colors

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NEWS
July 27, 1996
A newly hired reporter for the Bulletin (of sainted memory) was arrested for participating in a bank robbery in which someone was killed. The day of his arrest, he was fired. "Isn't a man innocent until proven guilty?" protested some staffers. "Nothing to do with it," snapped the editor. "He was fired for being on the scene of a story and not reporting it. " Lying about authorship of a novel isn't nearly so egregious, but it's surely a journalistic "crime" to contribute to publishing false information.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joe Klein, who covered the 1992 presidential campaign for Newsweek and then wrote the best-selling novel Primary Colors, will hold center stage at the community forum at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church at 7:30 p.m. May 1. Klein and his book, a roman a clef drawn on the campaign, stirred a beehive of controversy in 1996 when Klein was revealed as Anonymous, its author. Klein now is a political columnist for the New Yorker. His newest novel, The Running Mate, is due out any day, according to published reports.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | by Celia McGee, New York Daily News
When journalist Joe Klein was finally exposed as the "Anonymous" who wrote the best-selling tattle-tale "Primary Colors," in 1996, he promised he'd give the Republicans a dose of the same fictional medicine in his next book. Three and a half years, one job (he left a disgruntled Newsweek for The New Yorker) and a new publisher (he switched from Random House to Bertelsmann's Dial for more than $1 million) later, he's finished. Dial is rushing "The Running Mate" into print for an April 18 release.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Politics is a place where black and white blend into gray. Where principles blur into expediency. Where doing "what is right" melts into "doing what is necessary. " This terrain of moral ambiguity is never more treacherous than in an election campaign, the subject explored by the movie "Primary Colors," which opens today. We caught a sneak preview the other night with political consultant Neil Oxman of the Campaign Group. We dragooned Oxman for two reasons. First, we wanted to see how close the movie came to capturing the flavor of a political campaign from the inside.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anonymous is no more. Joe Klein, a Newsweek magazine columnist and CBS News commentator, told a news conference yesterday that he wrote the best-selling political novel Primary Colors - and lied about it for months. He added that he did not think his repeated, unqualified denials that he was the author would have any harmful effect on his career. "My credibility as a journalist stands," he said at a news conference at the office of his publisher, Random House, responding to a barrage of hostile questions about his deceptiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Mike Nichols, whose provocative film Primary Colors opens tomorrow, has a theory to explain why, no matter how many allegations of sexual misconduct are heaped on Bill Clinton, his approval rating remains high. "We're ambivalent," says the filmmaker, 66, over coffee in his office, across the street from Carnegie Hall. "As the President's ratings go up, so do the ratings for the sleazy tabloid shows. We want to satisfy our appetite for dish and our appetite for honor. " It can be reliably reported that Nichols' film - based on the 1996 Joe Klein roman a clef that might have been titled The Unmaking and Remaking of the President, 1992 - abundantly satisfies both.
FOOD
June 19, 1996 | By John Barry, KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE The Inquirer staff contributed to this article
"Anonymous" has a new book out. There soon may be even more books by "Anonymous. " In fact, there may one day be so many Anonymouses they'll need their own support group - Anonymouses Anonymous. On the coattails of the best-seller Primary Colors, by the Clinton administration insider known only as Anonymous, comes In the Kitchen with Bill: 50 Recipes for Chowing Down with the Chief (Cader Books, $8.95). It's also by "the best-selling Anonymous," the publishing house boasts. But not necessarily by THE Anonymous.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
How appropriate that director Mike Nichols gives us "Primary Colors" exactly 30 years after he won an Oscar for "The Graduate," the movie that captured the hope, promise and rebelliousness of young baby boomers. One of the most indelible scenes in American movies finds young Benjamin Braddock at a poolside cocktail party, staring incredulously at the drunken businessman advising him to devote his life to plastics. Benjamin is patronizing, but inwardly aghast: Who were those bitter, cynical strangers on the other side of the generation gap?
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey and Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITICS
Imagine Bill Clinton at the multiplex. He has a choice between Wag the Dog, about a president who fondles a Girl Scout and fakes a war to distract the electorate, and Deconstructing Harry, with a zippy one-liner about zipper problems in the White House. And if that's not enough, there's the titillating trailer for Primary Colors, opening March 20 and starring John Travolta as a progressive Southern governor whose presidential campaign is full of position papers and compromising positions.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | by Helen Kennedy, New York Daily News
Newsweek columnist Joe Klein confessed yesterday that, despite repeated denials, he is the $6 million mystery man behind "Primary Colors. " Klein said he didn't sign his name to the behind-the-scenes best-seller about the thinly disguised 1992 Clinton campaign because "I didn't want to be embarrassed if it was awful. " The book's titillating insider's portrait of a slick Southern governor and his tough, strident wife sparked frenzied speculation about the author. Even President Clinton got into the act, tweaking White House reporters for failing to learn the secret.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Hillary Clinton is a rock star. She is having her moment. But then, she has been having her moment for some time. Most politicians, battered by criticism, appear smaller with time. That has not happened with Hillary, who defied all the skeptics to become a superb secretary of state. By my count, Sigourney Weaver is the third terrific actress to play Hillary Clinton or a fictionalized version of her, this time in USA Network's Political Animals . Hillary has become a juicy part in movies and television, understandable given that her resumé is as impressive as it is improbable.
NEWS
May 11, 2007 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
THERE WE WERE, patting ourselves on the back and feeling smug and self-satisfied. The race isn't about "race," we said, marveling at the maturity of the Philadelphia voter. The candidates had focused on real issues like crime, poverty, education and economic development. Sure, there were some annoying little detours like the preoccupation with who was playing Monopoly with his own money and who couldn't remember how to fill out a financial disclosure form and who was afraid of letting us find out that his wife was a millionaire (as if we didn't know)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Shainee Gabel made her documentary debut with Anthem (1997), a carol about Americans across the political spectrum united by the love of liberty and mobility. This theme echoes through A Love Song for Bobby Long, an accomplished feature debut with stunning cinematography (by Elliot Davis), a jambalaya story line and yet another heart-stopping performance by Scarlett Johansson. John Travolta and Johansson costar as raggedy nomads who find common threads - and common ground - as default roommates in a shabby frame house on the sagging edge of New Orleans.
NEWS
May 11, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Kaethe Zemach's discomfort in describing her art underscores her struggles as daughter of Margot Zemach, the award-winning children's book illustrator. With eight children's books of her own, Kaethe Zemach (pronounced KAY-the) hesitantly depicted the transformations that her work had undergone from the unencumbered strokes of youth to the controlled, confident images of today. In that span of about 25 years, Zemach - who illustrated her first book as a teenager - dealt with the confusion and doubt that helped her mature artistically.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Remember that brief, shining moment in spring 2003 when journalists once again made us proud? Bravely hunting down war news in Iraq? Covering life and death decisions on the front lines? Doing what they're supposed to do - report crucial facts? Thank you, 60 Minutes and Simon & Schuster, for quickly bringing that epoch to a close. By the sound of this week's buzz, it's back to business as usual - the notion that the business of journalism (let alone America) is business, and often snarky business.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
I've been trying to work myself into a state of high dudgeon over the decision by the Jewish Museum in New York to host a display of controversial Holocaust art. So far, I haven't had much luck. I look at the controversy over the exhibits - a death camp made of Legos, a photograph of a man holding up a Diet Coke can amid a group of emaciated Jews - and what emerges is not as much anger as, well, I was going to say ambivalence, but that's not quite the right word. It's more a sense of recognition, a sense that we've been to this crossroads of art and indignation before, and it's no accident we keep coming back.
LIVING
December 6, 2000 | By Peter Mucha, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don Foster is a literary detective. He discovered that an unimpressive elegy may have been an overlooked work by Shakespeare. He tried his hand at guessing the identity of "Anonymous," who wrote the best-seller Primary Colors - and correctly concluded the author was Newsweek columnist Joe Klein. He backed the FBI in the Unabomber case and analyzed a suspicious memo supposedly written by Monica Lewinsky. Last year he turned his attention to questions about one of America's most cherished Christmas poems: "The Night Before Christmas.
LIVING
September 24, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Klein had a revelation during the Olympics. "I had always planned to use Charlie Martin, who had been a peripheral character in Primary Colors, but I didn't know exactly who Charlie was," Klein said during a recent interview. "I think I began really finding out when I decided his dad was going to be a musician, which came to me one night watching the Olympics in '96. All of a sudden I realized, his dad's a musician, and he began to come alive. " Thus the genesis of Klein's new book, The Running Mate (Dial Press, $26.95)
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joe Klein, who covered the 1992 presidential campaign for Newsweek and then wrote the best-selling novel Primary Colors, will hold center stage at the community forum at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church at 7:30 p.m. May 1. Klein and his book, a roman a clef drawn on the campaign, stirred a beehive of controversy in 1996 when Klein was revealed as Anonymous, its author. Klein now is a political columnist for the New Yorker. His newest novel, The Running Mate, is due out any day, according to published reports.
NEWS
February 2, 2000 | by Celia McGee, New York Daily News
When journalist Joe Klein was finally exposed as the "Anonymous" who wrote the best-selling tattle-tale "Primary Colors," in 1996, he promised he'd give the Republicans a dose of the same fictional medicine in his next book. Three and a half years, one job (he left a disgruntled Newsweek for The New Yorker) and a new publisher (he switched from Random House to Bertelsmann's Dial for more than $1 million) later, he's finished. Dial is rushing "The Running Mate" into print for an April 18 release.
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