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Primates

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NEWS
December 27, 1995 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
To better understand the grief over the deaths of the 23 residents at the Philadelphia Zoo, you have to understand the very nature of great primates themselves. That's because they're more like us than the creatures elsewhere in the zoo. They have great emotional range, just like humans. They can show great affection, loving and caring, while minutes later they're subject to fits of jealously and can be mean-spirited. Yet they can be humorous and outright playful.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1986 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it a housewarming. Call it the great outdoors. Call it a call of the wild. By any definition, a whole new World of Primates opens tomorrow at the Philadelphia Zoo. The centerpiece of the $6 million exhibit is a 1.1-acre oasis of greenery that shows the gorillas, gibbons, drills, lemurs, orangutans, tamarins and marmosets in the kind of environments they inhabit in nature. The exhibit is located in the center of the zoo, between the Reptile House and the Bird Lake, and is distinguished by its outdoor setting - a series of islands on which primates will be able to roam, play and forage.
NEWS
January 2, 2005 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gigantic leatherback turtle shoveled black sand backward to cover her freshly deposited eggs, then paused to catch her breath before resuming the task, fulfilling the ancient imperative to produce a new generation. Epifanio Mualeri Biri gently approached the animal, which can weigh more than half a ton and whose powerful flippers can inflict a nasty blow. He extended a tape measure across the shell - 6 feet long and 3 1/2 feet wide. To Mualeri, handling this magnificent creature is all in a night's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1986 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
After years of fending off jokes about what's gnu at the Philadelphia Zoo, officials this season have a ready-made answer. It's the new World of Primates exhibit center, where gorillas and great apes will monkey around in natural settings to entertain visitors. "The World of Primates complex is a $6-million naturalistic habitat of unparalleled scope, a virtual Shangri La for primates, where family groupings will play, eat, sleep and breed among plantings and in privacy, just like they would in the wild," zoo president William Donaldson said.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
Architect James Bradberry said he got "a little choked up" when Samantha became the first of the Philadelphia Zoo's six gorillas to venture out onto the gorillas' island at the new World of Primates exhibit. "She was very tentative," said Bradberry, who was in charge of designing the $6 million exhibit that opens to the public Saturday, as he watched the gorilla earlier this week. He saw Samantha walk out to the top of the hill on the lushly planted, tree-shaded island and gaze around at the new landscape.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You had to wonder what the little guys were thinking. There they were, a crew of rare and exotic lemurs: ruffed lemurs and ring-tailed lemurs and the rare blue-eyed lemurs from Madagascar by way of Duke University - the only blue-eyed lemurs that will be displayed in all of North America. They'd spent the last few days in quarantine, being drugged and poked and prodded, having blood drawn and shots administered. They'd gotten acquainted with each other and with their new home - the "Lemur Lookout," a 1,500- square-foot, 21-foot-high black metal enclosure full of lush green grass, tree limbs and vines just off the North Gate entrance at the Philadelphia Zoo. And, finally, on a sparkling morning yesterday, the lemurs (say it LEE-murs)
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | By Frank Greve, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Politicians apparently are like monkeys, in at least one respect. Brain researchers are finding that when dominant monkeys appear before their followers, something goes off in their heads - literally. Experimenters say it's a gush of complex brain chemicals that stimulate elation, confidence and sensory arousal. Many experts think campaigning politicians get the same kind of rush when they appear before supporters. Some of the chemicals released, they add, are probably addictive.
NEWS
August 7, 1999
Do monkeys have consciousness? It appears they might. Who the heck cares? Lots of folks, including scientists, philosophers, animal-rights activists and people who happen to like monkeys. That's because the human mind is rapidly arriving at one of its uttermost frontiers - the mind itself. And the hand that guides us there might be a lot hairier than ours. Charles Darwin started a firestorm in The Origin of Species when he wrote that the difference between human and animal intelligence is one of degree, not of kind.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
The only thing worse than being in a hospital is being in a hospital without a television. Particularly when you're cooped up in a lonely isolation room with nothing to do but pluck your hair or pop your welds. The people at the Penrose Laboratory Annex know the feeling. That's why they make sure the patients in Room 8 have a TV to help them battle boredom and dodge drudgery on their road to recovery. In one corner of the room, on top of a couple of milk crates, they set up a television for patient viewing.
NEWS
December 29, 1995 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
The $6 million primate house at the Philadelphia Zoo where 23 rare simians met a smoky death Christmas Eve was plagued by flaws when it opened in 1986 - problems so bad that the zoo filed a $300,000 lawsuit charging shoddy construction. The moat began leaking as soon as the ballyhooed exhibit opened in June 1986, forcing the zoo to confine the apes to their quarters for 11 days. Zoo officials later alleged other defects, including water line breaks and a failure by the contractor to fix a list of flaws detected before the opening.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
Honi and Kira spared no time exploring their new gorilla highway through the trees above the Philadelphia Zoo. Motuba, the zoo's male silverback, was the shy one: He climbed the stairs and then retreated to a more familiar field in the gorilla enclosure. The overhead path that opened Wednesday is the fourth in a series of trails that have been lauded as not only innovative but transformative for zoos, taking the experience - for the animals that live there as much as the Homo sapiens who visit - into new realms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WHILE MOST pop stars were rocking out at the iHeart Music Festival, in Las Vegas, the Music Midtown Festival, in Atlanta, or Farm Aid, in upstate New York, Rihanna spent a weekend at the beach in Thailand, leaving behind a trail of racy tweets and incriminating Instagram photographs that led police to arrest two men for allegedly peddling protected primates. On a break from her Diamonds World Tour, Rihanna stopped at the Thai island of Phuket, where she posted a link on Twitter to an Instagram photo that showed her snuggling up to a furry primate called the slow loris, and tweeted Friday: "Look who was talkin dirty to me!"
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - New fossil evidence of the earliest complete skeleton of an ancient primate suggests it was a hyperactive, wide-eyed creature so small you could hold a couple of them in your hand - if only they would stay still long enough. The 55 million-year-old fossil dug up in central China is one of our first primate relatives and gives scientists a better understanding of the complex evolution that eventually led to us. The monkeylike creature weighed an ounce or less and wasn't a direct ancestor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do animals have a sense of fairness? Do they empathize with another's pain? A few decades ago, such questions would have been dismissed as nonsense. Even today, they'd be rejected by many ethicists who argue that moral reasoning is unique to humans. Frans de Waal begs to differ. He holds that morality springs from our instincts as social animals, not from God, Society, Reason or any other capitalized Higher Being. The Dutch-born primatologist, who will speak at the Free Library of Philadelphia on Thursday at 7:30 p.m., has spent three decades upending our assumptions about the origin of morality.
NEWS
March 31, 2013 | By Pamela Sampson, Associated Press
BANGKOK, Thailand - The multibillion-dollar trade in illegal wildlife - clandestine trafficking that has driven iconic creatures like the tiger to near-extinction - is also threatening the survival of great apes, a new U.N. report says. Endangered chimpanzees, orangutans, gorillas, and bonobos are disappearing from the wild in frightening numbers, as private owners pay top dollar for exotic pets, while disreputable zoos, amusement parks, and traveling circuses clamor for smuggled primates to entertain audiences.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Cardinal Jozef Glemp, 83, the head of Poland's influential Roman Catholic Church from 1981 to 2004 - a time when it played a historic role in the fight against communism - died Wednesday, Jan. 23, in Warsaw after a long illness, a church spokesman said. Cardinal Glemp was the primate for most of the papacy of the Polish-born Pope John Paul II, who was elected in 1979. The church then enjoyed huge influence in Poland, with John Paul inspiring the Solidarity movement of Lech Walesa that helped topple communism in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
While it may be that some Americans doubt we're related to chimps and other primates, viruses recognize the similarities in our cells. The more closely two species are related, the more easily infections jump between them, said biologist Edward Holmes, who just moved from Penn State to the University of Sydney. For us humans, that means we're particularly vulnerable to catching diseases from other primates. HIV, for example, in various strains has jumped from primates to humans in at least 12 separate incidents.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Robert M. Sapolsky
With Michele Bachmann out of the race for the Republican presidential nomination, we are left with an array of the usual suspects in American politics - namely, a bunch of men who seem to spend much of their lives bragging about how tough they are. Until Thursday, we had Rick Perry waxing macho about the number of executions he had overseen in Texas. We have Rick Santorum threatening to bomb Iran. There's Newt Gingrich proclaiming that the race is going to boil down to being between "Newt and not Newt.
NEWS
December 28, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police are investigating a case of possible animal cruelty after the remains of 75 animals and a large altar composed of primate skulls were found yesterday inside a house in the city's Feltonville section. The animals are believed to have been sacrificed as part of satanic worship and Santeria rituals, investigators said. Pentagrams were also seen in the house. The remains included bones of a variety of animals, including sheep, goats, and chickens, police said. Authorities also removed the decomposing remains of what appeared to be two small primates, probably monkeys.
NEWS
March 22, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Zari is a stunner but not a star. The 7-year-old father of a small colony of golden lion tamarins, he scrambles over a tangle of vines in his exhibit at the Philadelphia Zoo. He and his two offspring, members of an endangered species of primate native to Brazil, weigh about 1 1/2 pounds. Exotic, almost otherworldly, they look like miniature, blond incarnations of Chewbacca the Wookiee from Star Wars. When children visit, the tamarins approach to check them out, but then quickly lose interest and retreat to a corner to groom each other in peace.
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