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Princess Cruises

NEWS
July 7, 1996 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Transatlantic air travel - including new USAir service between Philadelphia and three European capitals - is booming this summer, say airline officials and travel agents, so much so that finding a seat on a particular date may be a challenge for anyone who hasn't booked well ahead of time. While summer is traditionally the busiest time for U.S.-European travel, the forthcoming Atlanta Olympics, new service, and some fare promotions are helping to fill many flights. "Mid-July to mid-August, it's tough finding transatlantic seats," said Jane Appenbrink, an agent with Travel One in Ardmore.
NEWS
May 5, 1996 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Seven big cruise lines have been named in lawsuits alleging that the port charges they assess passengers are misleading and inflated beyond the actual fees levied by the port authorities on their itineraries. In the Caribbean, for instance, islands charge fees ranging from a few dollars per person to $20. A cruise usually stops at several ports, and a recent issue of Cruise Observer newsletter estimates that "on a typical seven-day cruise, the cruise lines charge passengers about $100 more than the islands charge the cruise lines.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | By Judi Dash, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thirty minutes into my morning jog on a high-tech treadmill overlooking an indigo Caribbean 12 decks below, the ship's intercom boomed the commencement of a vegetable-carving demonstration to be followed by the daily Jackpot Bingo game. The muscular guy sweating blissfully on the stair-climber next to me shot me a they-must-be-kidding smirk and I returned a smug snicker. We were "now" cruisers - youngish, active, doers not spectators. Cucumber bunnies and bingo seemed so old-fashioned for a spiffy new ship like the Sun Princess, where the programmable treadmills took your pulse from the warmth of your hand and a "virtual" golf center let you "play" some of the world's best courses via 12-foot video screens.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | By Frances Shemanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
The cruise offerings for this year's fall and winter season includes an increasing number of itineraries to increasingly exotic destinations. Antarctic sailings are among the most popular for adventure-seeking cruisers, while new routes to ports of call in southeast Asia and Africa are attracting experienced cruise passengers who've covered most of the traditional cruising grounds. The Caribbean, the Panama Canal, the Mexican Riviera and South America continue to draw the major share of ships and passengers during the fall and winter cruise season.
NEWS
June 12, 1994 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The clock runs out this week on the Colorado Tourist Board and its free vacation kits, which have become the victims of a statewide vote that eliminated funding. Beginning Wednesday, the tourist board's toll-free line is to be shut down, and kit stock will not be replenished. The demise of the board will make Colorado the only state not offering free official vacation kits - a dubious distinction for a state that relies heavily on tourism income. Nationwide, competition for tourists is hot among the states, and vacation kits are one of the prime ways that governments lure tourists.
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | By Frances Shemanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Caribbean, South America, the Panama Canal and the Mexican Riviera are the stars in this season's cruise offerings. There are even some late-date Mediterranean and European river cruises still available. In the Pacific, Asia (Vietnam featured), South Pacific and Far East voyages dominate the cruise scene. A seasonal favorite: The cruises from various ports that ply the waters of Antarctica (it will be summer down there). And world cruises remain popular among those with plenty of liquid assets and lots of time on their hands (although it is possible to buy segments of world-girdling voyages)
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Smokers will have to give up cigarettes while they're aboard Amtrak's shorter routes, beginning this month. The railroad has banned smoking on all train routes of 4 1/2 hours or less, including Metroliners. Up until last week, smoking was allowed in smoking cars and designated lounge areas. The new policy comes in response to comments and requests from passengers, according to an Amtrak spokeswoman. Amtrak also will experiment with a no-smoking policy in sleeping cars aboard two longer routes: the Capitol Limited, which travels between Washington and Chicago, and the Coast Starlight, which goes between Los Angeles and Seattle.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | By Frances Shemanski, FOR THE INQUIRER
The following list of fall, winter and early spring sailings is representative, not comprehensive, and is subject to change. To make bookings, call a travel agent. Costs are based on double occupancy of a cabin. The Caribbean continues to be a popular destination. On the increase this year are South American sailings from South American ports. Also this year, the Antarctic will be featured from both Australian and South American ports. In addition, there will be several African voyages as well as a large number of South Pacific and Asia cruises, with several stopping at Vietnamese ports of call.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | By Frances Shemanski, Special to The Inquirer
Following is a comprehensive guide to many cruises available during the coming season. The prices quoted are minimum to maximum rates per person, based on double occupancy of a cabin. Some cruise lines include air fare in the cruise prices, and this is indicated, where applicable and when available. Prices and itineraries are provided by the cruise companies and are subject to change. For information or bookings for any of the cruises listed, contact your travel agent. The list does not include Hawaiian or Pacific and Asia cruises, nor cruises to Africa and the Middle East.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1991 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Prices for Caribbean cruises are lower than ever. Thanks to the Persian Gulf War, you can save 25 percent to 50 percent on many cruises to the Caribbean and Bermuda. A typical deal is 2-for-1, which means 50 percent off the price of two tickets. Another is 50 percent off a second ticket, which means 25 percent off the price of two tickets. A couple could spend seven days cruising the eastern Caribbean aboard the S.S. Norway for half price: $1,440, instead of $2,880, excluding air fare to Miami, taxes and gratuities.
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