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Princeton University

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NEWS
September 28, 1987 | By Cindy Lee Horowitz, Special to The Inquirer
Princeton University soon will begin to reap the benefits of its prestigious name in the marketplace. Manufacturers of items that bear the Princeton name and emblems - from sweat shirts to desk sets to boxer shorts - are now required to register their products with the school and to pay royalties. Officials say the trademark- licensing program was designed in response to an overwhelming demand for Princeton goods, as well as a defense against companies that falsely identify their products with the university.
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Always among the most-respected and best-endowed schools in the nation, Princeton University will become even richer today with "one of the largest gifts in the history of higher education," university officials said. Jacquelyn Savani, a Princeton spokeswoman, said the gift is "in the ballpark" with one provided by industrialist Henry Rowan, who gave Glassboro State College $100 million and a new name in 1992. But Savani declined yesterday to give the value of the gift or identify the donor.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul E. Sigmund and his brother Peter returned to the United States from Germany in 1933, the then-preschoolers could not speak English. "He and I both spent our first years in Germany," where their father worked as a civil engineer, Peter Sigmund said. Their American parents "considered it better to stick with one language. " So they were the only German-speaking children on their block of Hewitt Road in Wyncote, making them "an object of wonder," he said. On Monday, April 28, Paul Sigmund, 85, who retired in 2005 as a politics professor at Princeton University, died of complications from pneumonia at University Medical Center of Princeton.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Steve Kloehn, Special to The Inquirer
Wrapping up one of the most successful fund-raising campaigns of its kind, Princeton University announced yesterday that it had collected $410.1 million in contributions in the last five years. The "Campaign for Princeton," which began in July 1981 with a goal of $275 million, far surpassed its February 1984 revised goal of $330 million. "It has succeeded beyond what we ever thought it would do," said Van Zandt Williams, vice president for development. He said 39,100 people and 240 foundations and corporations had contributed.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Swarthmore College again beat out the University of Pennsylvania in a Forbes annual ranking of top U.S. colleges. In the magazine's 2016 ranking of the nation's top colleges and universities, Swarthmore came in at No. 10 and Penn at No. 11. The only other Pennsylvania school to come in the top 25 was Haverford College, at No. 23. Stanford University topped all at No. 1, Williams College came in at No. 2, Princeton University at No....
NEWS
April 23, 2013
From Princeton University, advice on what to do if you are on a wait list for college. See a video at: www.inquirer.com/wait
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Hauptfuhrer, 81, a Sun Oil executive whose entrepreneurial family came to the United States from Germany in the 1860s, died Sunday, Aug. 11, at Bryn Mawr Hospital from complications of a brain hemorrhage. His mother's father, Albert Schoenhut, immigrated from Wurttemberg in 1866 at age 17. He started making toy pianos out of a storefront on Frankford Avenue in 1872. The business later became the Schoenhut Toy & Piano Co., employing 400 workers. Mr. Hauptfuhrer's other grandfather, Henry, immigrated from Wollmar to Philadelphia in 1882 and founded Hauptfuhrer Dairies, which eventually became part of National Dairies.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this article
When the talking was over, the University of New South Wales, from way Down Under, was on top. The Australians argued that the death penalty was just desserts for such heinous offenders as cop killers, major drug dealers and war criminals - and edged Britain's Oxford Union Society to win the 15th annual World Universities Debating Championship on Sunday night. New South Wales won a 6-5 decision before about 700 spectators at Princeton University. Princeton hosted the largest and most international of college debate tournaments ever, a weeklong contest among 244 teams from about 30 nations.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ernest L. Ransome III, 86, of Okatie, S.C., and formerly of Camden County, a nationally ranked college athlete who earned the 1995 Ike Grainger Award from the U.S. Golf Association for more than 25 years of volunteer work, died Sunday, May 5, at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. A 16-year resident of Okatie, he previously resided at Pine Valley Golf Club in Pine Valley, Camden County, a daughter, Elizabeth Ransome, said Tuesday. Mr. Ransome since 1988 had been board chairman of his family firm, Giles & Ransome Inc., distributor of heavy construction equipment, with headquarters in Bensalem.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
Hillary Rodham Clinton greets participants in the Early Childhood Education Symposium at Princeton University. She was keynote speaker at the morning session yesterday. A panel discussion and workshops followed. The symposium was sponsored by Princeton and the New Jersey Legislature.
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NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Swarthmore College again beat out the University of Pennsylvania in a Forbes annual ranking of top U.S. colleges. In the magazine's 2016 ranking of the nation's top colleges and universities, Swarthmore came in at No. 10 and Penn at No. 11. The only other Pennsylvania school to come in the top 25 was Haverford College, at No. 23. Stanford University topped all at No. 1, Williams College came in at No. 2, Princeton University at No....
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Morris Cheston Jr., 78, of Spring House, a lawyer as renowned for his civic work as for his legal skills, died Sunday, June 5, of a heart attack at home. Mr. Cheston joined the Philadelphia law firm of Ballard Spahr L.L.P. in 1964. He became a partner in 1971 and senior counsel in 2009. His specialties were securities and corporate law, and legal matters involving the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Perhaps his signature achievement in Philadelphia came in 1997 when, as board chairman of Pennsylvania Hospital, he campaigned for and implemented the merger of Pennsylvania Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania Health System into Penn Medicine.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
At Interboro High School in 1966, John C. Hess was a starter on an All-Delaware County football team and in 1970 a starting tailback on the Princeton University team. "He was an incredible athlete," said Keith Lambie, owner of a surgical distribution firm who met Mr. Hess in Cape May in 1981. He often served as a crew member on Lambie's 30-foot sailboat, he said, once making it from Chesapeake Bay to Martha's Vineyard. After Mr. Hess - at 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds - was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2006, "he lived to come to Cape May," where Lambie and his family resided.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Joseph Neff Ewing Jr., 90, of Newtown Square, an attorney in Philadelphia and a Willistown Township leader for 22 years, died Friday, April 8, at home after a three-year battle with leukemia. The son of Joseph Neff and Anne Ashton Ewing, he was born in Valley Forge. He was a graduate of Haverford School, Princeton University, and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Mr. Ewing served in the Marine Corps at the end of World War II in Okinawa, Japan. In 1951, he married Margaret Converse Howe, and they had three daughters.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
ISSUE | PRINCETON Wilson's legacy Princeton University exercised good sense in retaining President Woodrow Wilson's name on its school of public and international affairs and an undergraduate residential college ("Princeton will retain Wilson's name," April 5). Medieval popes had armies and concubines, and George Washington and Thomas Jefferson owned slaves. Should we rob them of their transcendent contributions to a better world? Who among us can rise above our times and be judged out of historical context?
NEWS
April 6, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Princeton University will keep Woodrow Wilson's name on its school of public and international affairs and its undergraduate residential college despite the former president's racist past, the university announced Monday. The university had been under pressure from student protesters to remove the name of its former president because of Wilson's racist views and policies, including keeping black students from enrolling at Princeton when he headed it. But a board of trustees committee at Princeton decided to maintain Wilson's name, while committing to work on diversity and inclusion issues, and more fully educate people about Wilson's legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016
Literary Calendar Barnes & Noble - Rittenhouse Square 1805 Walnut St.; 215-665-0716. www.barnesandnoble.com . Simone Miller & Jennifer Robins: The New Yiddish Kitchen. 4/2. 2 pm. Free Library of Philadelphia - Central Branch 1901 Vine St.; 215-686-5322. www.freelibrary.org . Edna O'Brien: The Little Red Chairs. $15; $7 students. 4/4. 7:30 pm. James McBride: Kill 'Em & Leave - Searching for the Real James Brown. 4/5. 7:30 pm. Main Point Books 1041 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-525-1480.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2016
Repertory Films Abington Free Library 1030 Old York Rd., Abington; 215-885-5180. abg.mclinc.org/. Ruth & Robert Abel Memorial Book & Film Discussion Group. 4/6. Colonial Theatre 227 Bridge St., Phoenixville; 610-917-1228. www.thecolonialtheatre.com . The Burning (1981) $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $5 children 12 and under. 4/1. 9:45 pm. Gunga Din (1939) $9; $7 seniors and students with ID; $5 children 12 and under. 4/3. 2 pm. The Franklin Institute 222 N. 20th St.; 215-448-1200.
NEWS
March 5, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Former New Jersey Attorney General Robert J. Del Tufo, 82, of Princeton, who fought organized crime but was a prominent dissenting voice in the conduct of the Abscam political corruption investigation, died Wednesday of lung cancer, his family said. Mr. Del Tufo was the son of Italian immigrants and grew up in Newark, where his father ran a parking garage. He was the younger brother of Raymond Del Tufo, who served as U.S. attorney for New Jersey, a role Robert Del Tufo also filled as he rose through New Jersey's legal system.
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