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September 28, 1987 | By Cindy Lee Horowitz, Special to The Inquirer
Princeton University soon will begin to reap the benefits of its prestigious name in the marketplace. Manufacturers of items that bear the Princeton name and emblems - from sweat shirts to desk sets to boxer shorts - are now required to register their products with the school and to pay royalties. Officials say the trademark- licensing program was designed in response to an overwhelming demand for Princeton goods, as well as a defense against companies that falsely identify their products with the university.
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Always among the most-respected and best-endowed schools in the nation, Princeton University will become even richer today with "one of the largest gifts in the history of higher education," university officials said. Jacquelyn Savani, a Princeton spokeswoman, said the gift is "in the ballpark" with one provided by industrialist Henry Rowan, who gave Glassboro State College $100 million and a new name in 1992. But Savani declined yesterday to give the value of the gift or identify the donor.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul E. Sigmund and his brother Peter returned to the United States from Germany in 1933, the then-preschoolers could not speak English. "He and I both spent our first years in Germany," where their father worked as a civil engineer, Peter Sigmund said. Their American parents "considered it better to stick with one language. " So they were the only German-speaking children on their block of Hewitt Road in Wyncote, making them "an object of wonder," he said. On Monday, April 28, Paul Sigmund, 85, who retired in 2005 as a politics professor at Princeton University, died of complications from pneumonia at University Medical Center of Princeton.
NEWS
July 3, 1986 | By Steve Kloehn, Special to The Inquirer
Wrapping up one of the most successful fund-raising campaigns of its kind, Princeton University announced yesterday that it had collected $410.1 million in contributions in the last five years. The "Campaign for Princeton," which began in July 1981 with a goal of $275 million, far surpassed its February 1984 revised goal of $330 million. "It has succeeded beyond what we ever thought it would do," said Van Zandt Williams, vice president for development. He said 39,100 people and 240 foundations and corporations had contributed.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Halfway through his studies at Camden's Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Jonathan Kanen is leaving, flying 3,500 miles away. Kanen has been named one of 40 U.S. recipients of the Gates Cambridge Scholarships program. An additional 55 students from outside the country each year receive grants to study at the University of Cambridge in any field. As Rowan University's first Gates Cambridge scholar, Kanen, 27, will wrap up his second year of medical school before taking off for three years to study for a Ph.D.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
From Princeton University, advice on what to do if you are on a wait list for college. See a video at: www.inquirer.com/wait
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Butterworth, 87, formerly of Wayne, a lawyer with a great love of the outdoors and a commitment to community service, died Wednesday, July 8, of an obstructed airway while eating in his apartment at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. He was alone at the time. He had lived for 13 years at the senior community. For 40 years ending in 1993, Mr. Butterworth practiced law with Townsend, Elliot & Munson in Philadelphia, which merged into Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay in 1977. His specialties were real estate, municipal finance, and hospital law. Born in 1927, Mr. Butterworth was the son of James Ebert Butterworth and Dorothy Caroline Gardner.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jeff Gelles contributed to this article
When the talking was over, the University of New South Wales, from way Down Under, was on top. The Australians argued that the death penalty was just desserts for such heinous offenders as cop killers, major drug dealers and war criminals - and edged Britain's Oxford Union Society to win the 15th annual World Universities Debating Championship on Sunday night. New South Wales won a 6-5 decision before about 700 spectators at Princeton University. Princeton hosted the largest and most international of college debate tournaments ever, a weeklong contest among 244 teams from about 30 nations.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
Hillary Rodham Clinton greets participants in the Early Childhood Education Symposium at Princeton University. She was keynote speaker at the morning session yesterday. A panel discussion and workshops followed. The symposium was sponsored by Princeton and the New Jersey Legislature.
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NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Butterworth, 87, formerly of Wayne, a lawyer with a great love of the outdoors and a commitment to community service, died Wednesday, July 8, of an obstructed airway while eating in his apartment at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr. He was alone at the time. He had lived for 13 years at the senior community. For 40 years ending in 1993, Mr. Butterworth practiced law with Townsend, Elliot & Munson in Philadelphia, which merged into Reed, Smith, Shaw & McClay in 1977. His specialties were real estate, municipal finance, and hospital law. Born in 1927, Mr. Butterworth was the son of James Ebert Butterworth and Dorothy Caroline Gardner.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
June 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A 2012 Princeton University graduate hopes to add a burst of youth to Congress, launching a campaign to represent Delaware County and other Philadelphia suburbs. Lindy Li, who grew up in Malvern and has a home in Radnor, is running for the Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania's Seventh District, which also sprawls through Montgomery, Chester, Berks, and Lancaster Counties. Li, 24, said she was "ready to unleash the power of my generation. " She will turn 25, the minimum age to serve in Congress, in December.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  When George S. Weber and his group completed their climb to the summit of the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps in the 1950s, "he felt extremely blessed," a daughter, Ann Weber-Ammar, said. During such outdoor adventures, he told her later, "he had a sense of tremendous freedom and communion with God. " He certainly felt blessed, she said, when learning later about another party climbing at the same time, a group in which "someone did not make it to the top and fell to their death.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Michael Graves, 80, the Princeton architect as famous for the whimsical housewares he designed for Target as for his supersized, classically inspired postmodern buildings, died Thursday at his home, his firm announced. Graves, who taught at Princeton University for 39 years, became a popular success in the 1980s after he renounced theoretical modernism in favor of a brash postmodernist style. Starting with the Portland, Ore., municipal building in 1982, he began turning out a series of ornate, highly colored, and often cartoonish designs that employed simplified classical forms such as columns and pediments on a gigantic scale.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Princeton University on Monday announced its largest gift in history: a rare book and manuscript collection - including the first six printed editions of the Bible - valued at nearly $300 million. The 2,500-volume collection, which includes an original printing of the Declaration of Independence and Beethoven's autographed music sketchbook, has been housed at Princeton's Firestone Library since 1959. That's when alum and Philadelphia native William H. Scheide moved it there from Titusville in Western Pennsylvania, the town where he was reared.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Halfway through his studies at Camden's Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Jonathan Kanen is leaving, flying 3,500 miles away. Kanen has been named one of 40 U.S. recipients of the Gates Cambridge Scholarships program. An additional 55 students from outside the country each year receive grants to study at the University of Cambridge in any field. As Rowan University's first Gates Cambridge scholar, Kanen, 27, will wrap up his second year of medical school before taking off for three years to study for a Ph.D.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
WALL, N.J. - The five-story satellite dish made history nearly six decades ago, early in America's space race with the Soviet Union. It tracked the first U.S. space launch, Explorer 1, that year, and received the first hurricane data from the TIROS 1 satellite in 1960. Then the dish was mothballed in the late 1970s as more modern equipment came into use, and eventually was relegated to the status of science relic, part of the museum collection of the InfoAge Science Center at Camp Evans, a historic former Army Signal Corps center in Monmouth County.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William W. McDowell Jr., 85, an architect from Chestnut Hill, died Monday, Jan. 19, of complications from dementia at Springfield Residence in Wyndmoor, where he had lived for seven years. Mr. McDowell was born in Chestnut Hill and attended Chestnut Hill Academy until ninth grade, when the school closed during World War II. He transferred and graduated from St. Andrews School in Middletown, Del. He was a member of the Class of 1951 at Princeton University, where he played rugby. Mr. McDowell went on to study architecture at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1954 with high honors.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Muscoe Burnett Martin Jr., 59, an architect who designed environmentally responsible buildings long before the term build green became widely accepted, died Sunday, Dec. 28, of cancer at his home in Philadelphia. Mr. Martin used sustainable design to create the Environmental Education Center at the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Tinicum, the Horticulture Center for the University of Pennsylvania's Morris Arboretum in Chestnut Hill, and the Stroud Water Research Center in Chester County.
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