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NEWS
July 13, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
When Mt. Ephraim Baptist Church found itself without a minister after the 1987 death of the Rev. J. Earl Adkins, the congregation turned to Thomas Ellis for leadership. Ellis, a trustee chairman and financial secretary since the church was founded in 1956, chaired the Pulpit Committee's search for a new minister and generally helped keep the church on an even keel for five years until the Rev. W. Daniel Murray answered the call in 1992. "One of the things he's known for is his commitment and his focus," said his wife, Betty.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council President John F. Street yesterday promised to appoint a special Council committee this week to review all areas in which the Rendell administration is proposing to replace city workers with private firms. Street announced his intention as the administration squared off with unions representing non-uniformed city employees over plans to close the city printing shop and warehouse and replace them with private firms. "We intend to establish a broader process whereby the unions will have every opportunity to make a case," Street said as he chaired a hearing on Mayor Rendell's proposed $2.4 billion budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. "We have constantly heard that the union has ideas that are being ignored by the administration," Street said.
NEWS
November 8, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Argus Printing & Copying, founded 80 years ago as a commercial printer, recently completed its rejuvenation to serve a broader range of customers, from multimillion-dollar businesses to preschoolers not yet receiving allowances. The company has moved more than $100,000 worth of 21st-century technology onto its premises at 168 E. Lancaster Ave. "You have to keep up with the times and stay competitive," said owner Larry Smugar. "Now we can really give enhanced quality to our customers, who can walk in and use our computers to generate their own work.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | By Jodi Enda and Nancy Phillips, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Congressional candidate Lee A. Solomon turned up the heat yesterday in his bid to unseat U.S. Rep. Robert E. Andrews, asserting that Andrews broke the law by printing a congressional mailing at Camden County's expense. Andrews called the allegation "ridiculous," suggesting it was part of a nationwide Republican strategy to sling mud. Solomon, an assemblyman and former Camden County freeholder, called a morning news conference outside the county administration building to accuse Andrews of using the county print shop to generate a recent mailing.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some prisoners at Holmesburg started making money in the prison print shop. About 6,000 $20 bills. But after an offset printing plate of a $20 bill and sheets containing partly printed money were found by prison employees Wednesday, the money- making process was prematurely curtailed, said Ernest Kun, special agent in charge of the Secret Service office in Philadelphia. The office began investigating the counterfeiting attempt yesterday. As of late yesterday, no arrests had been made.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An Atlantic City man has avoided a possible death sentence by pleading guilty to the 1993 murders of three people in the print shop where he worked. Clarence Reaves, 34, has been held in Atlantic County Jail on $250,000 cash bail since the day after the April 23, 1993, killings of Julie Ann Storkson, 24; her 2-year-old daughter, Gloria Massey; and the child's father, Ronald Massey, 33. Storkson's older daughter, Alexis, who was 5 at the time, survived the attack and became the center of a bitter custody battle between her biological father and the Lower Township couple who had taken care of her after the killings and who owned the shop where the crimes took place.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Julie Storkson often stayed late on Fridays - kept company by her boyfriend and two daughters in the print shop where she worked. But last Friday, something went drastically wrong. All four were found beaten and set afire in the rear of Cape Atlantic Printing Emporium, less than two blocks from the Boardwalk. Only Storkson's 5-year-old daughter, Alexis, is still clinging to life at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. She was listed in critical condition yesterday.
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
What's new Mitch Prensky, the caterer behind the bistro of Supper on South Street, has a storefront for his Southern-style biscuit sandwiches. Scratch Biscuits opened this week at 1306 Chestnut St. The shop, which offers all sorts of varieties, is open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday to Saturday. It also opens from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays, selling $5 chicken sandwiches out of the shop's back door on Drury Street near 13th Street. Xfinity Live, the entertainment center in the heart of the sports complex in South Philadelphia, has embarked on a $6 million renovation and expansion.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Holmesburg Prison inmates Michael Striganivicz and Albert Johnson were assigned to work in the prison print shop, corrections officials apparently were hoping they would learn a trade that would help them when they finished paying their debts to society. But making bogus $20 bills was not what they had in mind. Yesterday, the two inmates and a former civilian employee at Holmesburg were indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that they printed $153,000 worth of one-sided $20 bills that were discovered by prison workers on Dec. 7. Striganivicz, 31, Johnson, 31, and Lenell Nesmith, 34, a former supervisor of inmates in the print shop, were charged with conspiracy to counterfeit U.S. currency, counterfeiting and making printing plates.
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lenell Nesmith could have spent the next two years behind bars. But he won't, and it's all because of his 10-year-old son. Nesmith, a former Holmesburg Prison supervisor, had pleaded guilty to helping two inmates make $153,000 worth of counterfeit U.S. currency in the prison print shop. At a sentencing hearing yesterday, U.S. District Judge Raymond J. Broderick said he had decided not to lock Nesmith up because he wanted Nesmith's son, Maurice, to have a father. "There was only one thing I heard today while sitting here that has changed my mind that you should get a substantial prison sentence," Broderick said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
What's new Mitch Prensky, the caterer behind the bistro of Supper on South Street, has a storefront for his Southern-style biscuit sandwiches. Scratch Biscuits opened this week at 1306 Chestnut St. The shop, which offers all sorts of varieties, is open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday to Saturday. It also opens from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays, selling $5 chicken sandwiches out of the shop's back door on Drury Street near 13th Street. Xfinity Live, the entertainment center in the heart of the sports complex in South Philadelphia, has embarked on a $6 million renovation and expansion.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Olivier de St. Martin slept fitfully Wednesday. So he climbed out of bed in his Cherry Hill home at 4 a.m., turned to the website of the French daily newspaper Le Figaro, and was shocked by a predawn bulletin about the massacre of 12 people by Islamic extremists at Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper in Paris. "When I saw the pictures," he said Friday, "well, first of all, I was pissed off, infuriated. " Throughout Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, amid a countrywide manhunt and two hostage-takings, the French-born owner of the Center City restaurants Caribou Cafe, Zinc Bistro, and Petit Roti was glued to news reports and social media, darting among Facebook, Radio-Television Luxembourg, CNN, and French and English websites.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Peering through the plate-glass windows of the new retail space on Market Street in West Philadelphia, Jiaqi Wu thought she was looking at just another coffee shop in a town brimming with them. Then she reconsidered, thinking they must be serving something extraordinary, given the name on the door: The Creative Café @ Replica. "I was wondering if the coffee itself was creative," recalled Wu, a Californian pursuing a master's degree in applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 28, 2013
  K EITH LEAPHART, 38, of Overbrook Farms, is an osteopath-turned-entrepreneur. He owns Replica, a Center City graphic-design, digital-copying, printing and branding firm, acquired in 2009. Q: You're a trained osteopath. Why did you leave medicine? A: I'm a physician by training and entrepreneur by birth. The clinical setting was too limiting for me. I was on the staff of Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital in Malvern for about six years. I gave up my hospital privileges there in July 2011.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The treasured documents are rarely seen. They're tucked in acid-free Mylar, inside a dark safe, behind a thick door of a walk-in, climate-controlled vault at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Their soaring words - on handwritten and printed paper - are usually viewed by only a few staff members who have security clearance to exit an elevator to the second floor where the vault is located, within a locked room. They represent the thought processes of the nation's founders as they grappled with the language of the Constitution of the United States.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students with Burlington County Institute of Technology's culinary arts department have been cooking up delicacies for Friday night's International Food Festival to mark the high school's 50-year anniversary. Many of the school's career majors will be contributing to the event, from banners and tickets produced by the print shop to a student-produced DVD to show the variety of the school's offerings, which have grown from machine shop and office skills to choices like performing arts, entertainment technologies, and public safety and more.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blue Ivy Carter made her public debut Saturday when Beyoncé Knowles and Jay-Z took their 7-week-old daughter to lunch at Sant Ambroeus in Manhattan's West Village. The "Single Ladies (Put a Ring On It)" singer, 30, held her newborn close in a blue BabyBjorn. Moving on Mary Jo Buttafuoco , who was shot in the face by her husband's teenage lover nearly 20 years ago, remarried in Las Vegas on Saturday. TMZ.com reports she used her maiden name, Connery , when she exchanged vows with Stu Tendler , said to manage a Vegas print shop.
NEWS
May 2, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Monahan, 87, of Westmont, a World War II veteran who survived a plane crash and went on to a successful career in the printing industry, died of congestive heart failure Wednesday, April 28, at his home. Mr. Monahan loved the printing industry so much that after 20 years at Curtis Publishing Co. in Philadelphia, he decided to teach in the print shop at his alma mater, Camden County Technical Schools. He taught hundreds of students the art of printing, including diplomas and the school newspaper, said Shawn McKay, a teacher at the school.
NEWS
May 19, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even 282 years after he ran away, Benjamin Franklin is having a hard time coming home. Boston was to have been the first stop after Philadelphia for the international exhibition celebrating Franklin's 300th birthday next year. But the Museum of Science here decided to stage a Star Wars exhibit instead. That decision has left local Franklin boosters scrambling to arrange a proper party, and it set the touring show on a new path - to the West and South. "It really is kind of a public embarrassment not to have a role in the national celebration," said Jeffrey L. Sedgwick, associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts.
NEWS
March 5, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For printer Dave Kuncas, not being able to have a sign was the sign that he needed a change. His business, Dave's Swift Print, had been in Woodbury for three years, but sales had been steadily declining since he opened in 1993, he said. Part of the problem, he said, was city regulations that he felt were suffocating his business. He said there were not enough parking spaces, he was having trouble obtaining a permit to expand his shop, and he could not get the sign he wanted approved by the township's historical committee.
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