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Printing Press

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NEWS
May 13, 1993 | For The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
The way things used to be was the theme of the Mercer Folk Fest during the weekend at the Mercer Museum in Doylestown Borough. More than 100 artisans in period dress demonstrated crafts that included pipe-boring, basketry, blacksmithing, glass-blowing and stone-cutting. Melissa Mausolf, 8, makes a Mother's Day card on an old printing press in the children's craft tent. Her sister, Sarah, 11, is at right.
NEWS
February 2, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With 36 spikes protruding from his head, a Bucks County teenager appeared before a federal judge yesterday seeking readmission to the Bucks County Technical School. The judge couldn't hide a big grin on his face. Raymond Mitchell 3d, with gold and brown spiked hair shooting eight inches into the air, told the judge he was denied admission to the school's printing program because of his hairstyle. Mitchell's attorney, Philip Berg, is asking for a temporary injunction preventing the school from discriminating against him because of his hair.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary E. Nace Till, 66, a former columnist and reviewer for the Suburban and Wayne Times, died of a brain hemorrhage Saturday at Paoli Memorial Hospital. She lived in Malvern. Mrs. Till worked for the Suburban for about 10 years beginning in the mid-1980s. She started as a typesetter and later moved from the composing room to the newsroom, reviewing the theater and the Philadelphia Folk Festival. She also developed a following with her column called footnotes, which appeared regularly in the Suburban.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | by Signe Wilkinson, Daily News Editorial Cartoonist
PUBLIC ART IN PHILADELPHIA By Penny Balkin Bach Temple University Press / $29.95 For anyone who has walked by the Municipal Services Building and wondered who dropped the pile of plaster that's labeled "Government of the People," Penny Balkin Bach's Public Art in Philadelphia will be an indispensable traveling companion. Without taking sides on the artistic merits of the pieces, Bach gives a brief and lively account of how more than 200 works of sculpture, ironwork, mosaic and other art forms were woven into the rich fabric of Philadelphia's public landscape.
SPORTS
November 4, 2011
Owning an NFL franchise is a license to print money. Usually gobs of money. But, according to Forbes Magazine, one of the 32 NFL teams couldn't figure out how to run the printing press. Besides being the worst team of the 21st century in terms of record, the Detroit Lions also managed the neat trick of losing money in 2010, the magazine said.   Amazing stat In his two starts, a win over the Dolphins and a loss to the Lions, Denver quarterback Tim Tebow has been in the shotgun formation an average of 40 times a game.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | By Gabriel Escobar, Daily News Staff Writer
They had all the ingredients: paper, green ink and a printing press just outside Philadelphia. Fast money? You got it. In one month, authorities said, the operation "made" at least $300,000 in bogus $20 bills. At least $60,000 were then sold to someone in Northeast Philadelphia last December. Unfortunately for the operation, the government was watching. Two months later, when things started getting hot, the three men got rid of the money faster than they had printed it. They dumped about $3.6 million in fake $20 bills in Maple Beach Pond in Bristol, authorities said.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maurice Robbins, 77, of Wallingford, who founded Robbins Motor Transportation Inc. in Eddystone, died Friday at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Under Mr. Robbins' leadership, the company became a well-known heavy- hauling firm that does about $25 million a year in business. Mr. Robbins had turned over operation of the company to five family members, but still worked daily as an adviser and managed the repair shop. Mr. Robbins, who was known as "Murph," started the company when he was 16 - before he even had a driver's license.
NEWS
March 27, 2005 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Art has always evolved with technology, and technology with art. Printmaking is a good example. Originating first as stone rubbings and then as a process done with woodcuts, printmaking blossomed more widely after the invention of the printing press. As newer materials became available, artists began to use them in innovative ways, creating still newer techniques. Today, printmaking thrives as an art form. "It has gone way beyond the simple foundations of the craft," says Pat McGrady, curator of the Palmer Museum of Art in State College.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three sales next week will feature three categories of collectibles, each linked with history - one of local chronicles, one of nautical memorabilia, and one of an entertainer's mementos. The chronicles comprise two dozen books from two estates in Bucks County whose titles themselves sketch in a history of the area. They will be featured at tomorrow's regular Sunday Clinton Gallery Auction beginning at 10 a.m. at the Warwick Township fire company on Route 263 in the Bucks County community of Jamison.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By Charles Krauthammer
Pharmaceutical companies live on patent protection. They make their profits in the few years they enjoy a monopoly on the drugs they have discovered. They fight fiercely to protect their turf, and give generously to politicians to make sure they protect that turf too. Who, then, do you think has just issued a report showing that changes in law and regulation have effectively doubled the drug companies' patent protection time? Some tiny, Naderite public interest group? Some other representative of the little guy?
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NEWS
December 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NO ONE COULD get Irv Borowsky to admit that he had any regrets over losing $3 billion. In fact, knowing what kind of a guy Irv Borowsky was, it wouldn't have been surprising to discover that he actually got a rueful chuckle when he learned that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. paid that price for the company that owned TV Guide in 1988. After all, Irv started a publication in Philadelphia that ultimately morphed into TV Guide, one of the world's richest magazines. Irv's publication, TV Digest, started in 1948 to list local TV programs, was sold to Walter Annenberg in 1952 for $300,000, half for him and half for his brother Arthur, plus $300 a week for 15 years.
NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louis W. Yellin, an enterprising businessman who started in the 1960s with a used press in the basement of his parents' Philadelphia grocery and built a busy South Jersey printing and graphics firm, died Wednesday, April 3, at his Mount Laurel home. He was 71 and had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With his wife, Annette, Mr. Yellin took A.E. Litho Group from its subterranean beginnings in the city's Tacony section, over the Delaware and into a roomier facility in Riverside.
NEWS
February 28, 2012
By James Carroll 'I extend to you and the Afghan people my sincere apologies. " President Obama sent this message to Afghan President Hamid Karzai last week in the thick of mass protests after U.S. personnel burned copies of the Quran. NATO commander Gen. John R. Allen had earlier offered "sincere apologies ... to the noble people of Afghanistan," but the demonstrations raged on. Members of Afghanistan's parliament called for jihad against Western forces, at least two coalition soldiers were shot dead, and multiple civilians were killed in the violence that accompanied the protests.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
By Cullen Murphy Inside the gates of the Vatican, just south of St. Peter's Basilica, stands a Renaissance palazzo that was once the headquarters of the Inquisition. It's still the repository of Inquisition archives dating back nearly 500 years. The archives have been open to researchers since 1998, and I visited them on several occasions while working on a book. One day, among the stacks, I came across two polished wooden boxes resembling drawers from an old library card catalog, with hinged tops.
SPORTS
November 4, 2011
Owning an NFL franchise is a license to print money. Usually gobs of money. But, according to Forbes Magazine, one of the 32 NFL teams couldn't figure out how to run the printing press. Besides being the worst team of the 21st century in terms of record, the Detroit Lions also managed the neat trick of losing money in 2010, the magazine said.   Amazing stat In his two starts, a win over the Dolphins and a loss to the Lions, Denver quarterback Tim Tebow has been in the shotgun formation an average of 40 times a game.
NEWS
December 10, 2010
Heed Pa. report on death sentence The editorial on Texas' execution of a demonstrably innocent man, Claude Howard Jones, should be required reading for every Pennsylvania legislator ("Kill the death penalty," Monday). So should the report of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Committee on Racial and Gender Bias in the Justice System, which called for a moratorium on executions in a capital-justice system so fundamentally flawed as to fail the elementary requirements of due process. This report has gathered dust since it was issued in 2003.
NEWS
August 23, 2009 | By Courtland Milloy
I recently visited the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing to watch money being made. Call it a cheap thrill while waiting for some real economic stimulation. "We print between 700 and 750 million dollars a day," said P.J., a tour guide. At that rate, it would take less than five minutes to stimulate my bank account, boost my consumer confidence, and get me spending again. Ooo la la. Through windows along the tour route, I saw sheets of $100 bills coming out of a 52-foot-long, 12-foot-high monster of a printing press.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2009 | By Katie Haegele FOR THE INQUIRER
Last year I wrote a batch of poems, one for every letter of the alphabet and each inspired by an obsolete word of English. I didn't "send them out," as many poets would, to literary journals for their consideration. Instead, I made a little book. I asked a friend to design and typeset it, which he did, beautifully, and another friend to print it. This friend, Taylor Ball, is from Virginia but lives in Philadelphia now. He runs Parcell Press (www.parcellpress.com), a company that distributes zines and other independent media.
LIVING
September 28, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Freeman's sale Thursday of fine books and ephemera concentrates on what we might once have called a faraway place, but which now has become all too pertinent: the Middle East. Several items reflect how enigmatic that area has been. One of the top lots among the more than 500 to be sold, beginning at 10 a.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St., is a 22-volume summary of the observations and research done in Egypt during Napoleon's expedition there. Expected sale price is $40,000 to $70,000, according to presale estimates.
NEWS
July 20, 2006 | By Walter Fox
In a year of cascading events marking the 300th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth, let's take note of a less-renowned Franklin: Ben's half-brother James. If James Franklin has become a footnote to the life of his illustrious sibling, it is not without some fault on James' part. When Ben at age 12 became an indentured apprentice in James' printing shop, the terms of the indenture were not exactly brotherly. Most indentures ran for seven years. Ben's was for nine, with journeyman's pay only in the final year.
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