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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
An Atlantic City man was indicted yesterday for the April slayings of a co- worker, her boyfriend and the couple's two-year-old daughter at a printing shop. Atlantic County Prosecutor Jeffrey Blitz said he will seek the death penalty against Clarence Reaves, 32, of Brigantine Boulevard. Reaves, a part-time printer at the shop, was charged with the April 23 murders of Julie Ann Storkson, 24, Ronald Massey, 33, and Gloria Massey, 2, of Atlantic City. He was also charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault against Alexis Storkson, 5, the daughter of Julie Ann Storkson.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
RESTAURANT owners, apple lovers and selfie-stick users can rest easy: The 2016 Democratic National Convention won't have any of the negative restrictions that were associated with the recent papal visit. That was one of the core messages that Mayor Nutter emphasized at a news conference with DNC officials inside a South Philadelphia printing shop yesterday afternoon. The other: Local businesses stand to make a lot of money off the convention next July. As many as 50,000 people are expected to attend the DNC - being held in Philly for the first time since 1948 - bringing an estimated $350 million economic impact to the city, said the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO. Daughtry said DNC officials would spend up to $50 million on convention-related necessities, including lighting and staging equipment.
NEWS
November 3, 2015
A BDOULAYE Coumbassa, 40, of West Philadelphia, is owner and CEO of Abbi Print in West Philadelphia. Coumbassa, who emigrated from Guinea in 1998, started the printing company in June 2010. It offers a wide array of printing services, including binding, screen printing, press printing, regular and digital printing, and graphic-art design. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: A friend's father owned a printing shop in Guinea, and while I was in college we'd go to the shop after classes.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Democratic National Convention Committee has settled in Philadelphia and is open for business. Jude Arijaje, owner of Minuteman Press on South Broad Street, stood next to Mayor Nutter and the Democratic National Convention Committee CEO on Thursday in his printing shop as proof that the DNC wants to partner with local businesses in advance of the party's national convention here next year. "Small businesses, large business, we want everyone to have a shot at the pie," the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO, said.
NEWS
November 3, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia has been a hub for at least two gangs of audio tape pirates whose sales of counterfeit cassettes, featuring top recording artists, may have caused $96 million in losses to the recording industry in the past seven years. Federal authorities announced that 17 people, including two local businessmen, have been charged with crimes ranging from conspiracy, trafficking in counterfeit labels and copyright infringement, to money laundering. One local businessman, Thomas McGovern, 35, owns a printing shop in Clifton Heights, Delaware County, where counterfeit labels were made for the cassettes.
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | By William H. Sokolic, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chris Perry came to Atlantic City yesterday on a long shot. He's hoping his role as the biological father will win him custody of 5- year-old Alexis Storkson, the daughter who until yesterday he hadn't seen for almost four years. The question of custody for Alexis Storkson arose after her mother, sister and mother's boyfriend were killed in the office of an Atlantic City printing shop in late April. Julie Ann Storkson, 24, and her boyfriend, Ronald Massey, 33, were beaten with a claw hammer.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer
IMAGINE IF the Philadelphia Eagles had rehired Buddy Ryan, their famously hard-nosed head coach, twice . That might give you a sense of the reaction inside Philadelphia Media Network's headquarters Wednesday when the company announced that two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Bill Marimow will become editor of the Inquirer May 1. It's a bit of deja vu for Marimow, who was the paper's editor from 2006 until the fall of 2010, when...
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
If you didn't know better, Trento Brizi and Aldo Brunacci might look like a couple of retired paisanos sitting on a park bench waiting for hungry pigeons to totter by for a handout. They're not. Brizi goes to work every day in his small, one-man printing shop that's been in the family for more than 60 years. Brunacci's still working, too. In fact, his job's good for a lifetime. He's a priest. No, Trento Brizi, 74, and Father Aldo Brunacci, 75, are not ready to feed the pigeons.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Daniel Rubin
Raymond the Amish Comic said to look for him outside the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville. A mop of shaggy hair. A long, graying beard that began at the jaw. And a Saab 900. "You weren't expecting a horse and buggy were you?" he asked. Raymond is 54, and in recovery after growing up Amish on a farm in Blue Ball, Lancaster County. His parents died when he was a boy. He was never baptized, "so I never signed the deal," he says. "I never took the oath. So I'm really not shunned.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Some folks tie a ribbon around a finger to remind themselves to do something; others jot down a note or two. But what if you have to remind a whole town that you exist? Business owners on a slowly revitalizing Merchant Street have a strategy: They're holding a block party on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. "It's kind of a forgotten area," said Charlotte Skeggs, who, with her husband, Joe, has owned a printing shop on Merchant Street for 12 years. "We just want people to come to the street and see that we're still here.
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NEWS
November 3, 2015
A BDOULAYE Coumbassa, 40, of West Philadelphia, is owner and CEO of Abbi Print in West Philadelphia. Coumbassa, who emigrated from Guinea in 1998, started the printing company in June 2010. It offers a wide array of printing services, including binding, screen printing, press printing, regular and digital printing, and graphic-art design. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: A friend's father owned a printing shop in Guinea, and while I was in college we'd go to the shop after classes.
NEWS
October 17, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Democratic National Convention Committee has settled in Philadelphia and is open for business. Jude Arijaje, owner of Minuteman Press on South Broad Street, stood next to Mayor Nutter and the Democratic National Convention Committee CEO on Thursday in his printing shop as proof that the DNC wants to partner with local businesses in advance of the party's national convention here next year. "Small businesses, large business, we want everyone to have a shot at the pie," the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO, said.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
RESTAURANT owners, apple lovers and selfie-stick users can rest easy: The 2016 Democratic National Convention won't have any of the negative restrictions that were associated with the recent papal visit. That was one of the core messages that Mayor Nutter emphasized at a news conference with DNC officials inside a South Philadelphia printing shop yesterday afternoon. The other: Local businesses stand to make a lot of money off the convention next July. As many as 50,000 people are expected to attend the DNC - being held in Philly for the first time since 1948 - bringing an estimated $350 million economic impact to the city, said the Rev. Leah Daughtry, the convention's CEO. Daughtry said DNC officials would spend up to $50 million on convention-related necessities, including lighting and staging equipment.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | Daniel Rubin
Raymond the Amish Comic said to look for him outside the Colonial Theatre in Phoenixville. A mop of shaggy hair. A long, graying beard that began at the jaw. And a Saab 900. "You weren't expecting a horse and buggy were you?" he asked. Raymond is 54, and in recovery after growing up Amish on a farm in Blue Ball, Lancaster County. His parents died when he was a boy. He was never baptized, "so I never signed the deal," he says. "I never took the oath. So I'm really not shunned.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer
IMAGINE IF the Philadelphia Eagles had rehired Buddy Ryan, their famously hard-nosed head coach, twice . That might give you a sense of the reaction inside Philadelphia Media Network's headquarters Wednesday when the company announced that two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Bill Marimow will become editor of the Inquirer May 1. It's a bit of deja vu for Marimow, who was the paper's editor from 2006 until the fall of 2010, when...
NEWS
July 20, 2006 | By Walter Fox
In a year of cascading events marking the 300th anniversary of Benjamin Franklin's birth, let's take note of a less-renowned Franklin: Ben's half-brother James. If James Franklin has become a footnote to the life of his illustrious sibling, it is not without some fault on James' part. When Ben at age 12 became an indentured apprentice in James' printing shop, the terms of the indenture were not exactly brotherly. Most indentures ran for seven years. Ben's was for nine, with journeyman's pay only in the final year.
NEWS
April 9, 2006 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Benjamin Franklin's wife, Deborah Read Rogers Franklin, might have benefited from a visit to iVillage, the online site dedicated to women's issues. She would, of course, have had to wade through all those practical tips for the modern wife and mother: how to evaluate anti-aging skin creams, how to encourage kids to eat well, how to be a sex goddess. And she would have had to find the link to Redbook magazine's primer on how to keep your marriage happy after age 45. There at the bottom, under the heading "Indulge each other's dreams," she would have discovered that seasoned couples like her and Ben must nurture the desires of each to continue to grow and explore.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In the age of video games, Hollywood wizardry and the dazzling computer animation of Finding Nemo, playwrights trying to reach children with the low-tech resources of the theater face a daunting challenge. So Laurie Brooks resorted to shock treatment. Franklin's Apprentice, her inventive play making its East Coast premiere on the stage of the Arden Theatre, takes its audience back to 18th-century Philadelphia. It begins with an electrical demonstration staged by a charlatan named Spencer who tries to impress gullible onlookers by sending charges first through a wire spider and then through his own apprentice.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2001 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before the World Wrestling Federation or the NBA opened a theme store here, Nate Freedman created a retail shrine to the men and women known as New York's Bravest. For the last decade, a store called New York Firefighter's Friend has served members of the department seeking caps, T-shirts, and black-and-yellow fire coats. There has been plenty of tourist traffic, as well. But before Sept. 11, the store was largely a quirky footnote in most travel guides. Today, people from all over the country stream into the cramped space at 263 Lafayette St. in SoHo.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
When Mt. Ephraim Baptist Church found itself without a minister after the 1987 death of the Rev. J. Earl Adkins, the congregation turned to Thomas Ellis for leadership. Ellis, a trustee chairman and financial secretary since the church was founded in 1956, chaired the Pulpit Committee's search for a new minister and generally helped keep the church on an even keel for five years until the Rev. W. Daniel Murray answered the call in 1992. "One of the things he's known for is his commitment and his focus," said his wife, Betty.
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