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Prison Labor

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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | By Robert A. Rankin, R.A. Zaldivar and Owen Ullman, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A handful of misleading statements were made during the debate last night among President Bush, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and independent Ross Perot. Among them: TRADE. Perot said free-trade agreements with countries that pay low wages and do not impose environmental regulations on business lead to mass losses of U.S. jobs. Fact: He's wrong. Bush was right when he said such agreements stimulate net gains of new U.S. jobs. Rising U.S. exports have been responsible for more than half the growth of the U.S. economy in the last five years.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
BERLIN - Swedish furniture giant Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters is in Conshohocken, expressed regret Friday that it benefited from the use of forced prison labor by some of its suppliers in communist East Germany more than two decades ago. The company released an independent report showing that East German prisoners, among them many political dissidents, were involved in the manufacture of goods supplied to Ikea 25 to 30 years ago. The report concluded...
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fifty years ago, Harry Wu was a carefree Jesuit school student living in the wealthy suburbs of Shanghai. He cared more about baseball and girls than politics. This week, before an audience at the Hill School, the human-rights activist and Chinese dissident, 60, reflected on the harrowing experiences he has lived through since his comfortable childhood. Some Americans may remember Wu as the man who exposed prison labor in China by smuggling video cameras into prisons for a 60 Minutes expose.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | BY NANCY PELOSI
On May 2, 61 members of Congress joined me as original co-sponsors of a bill to condition renewal of China's most favored nation status on an improvement in human rights conditions there. MFN entitles a country to the lowest tariffs on its exports to the United States. By law, we are not allowed to extend MFN to a country with a centralized economy - a communist system. However, the president has the power to waive the law, as President Bush has done with China. In the 1980s, privatization was encouraged by China's government, special economic zones were established and central government control over microeconomic decision-making was relaxed.
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Juan O. Tamayo, McClatchy Newspapers
MIAMI - The Cuban government-owned enterprise Provari is known on the island for making everything from bricks and construction blocks to mattresses, tourist handicrafts, and the insecticide Lomate - "I Killed It. " What is less well known is that the vast majority of its workers are prison inmates - what dissidents denounce as "slave laborers" who work with few safety protections and receive meager wages or are not paid at all. Prison labor...
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | the Inquirer staff
PEP BOYS HIKES DIVIDEND Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack, the chain of auto stores based in Philadelphia, announced yesterday that it was raising the quarterly cash dividend on its common stock from 3.25 cents a share to 3.5 cents, payable July 27 to shareholders of record on July 13. The company will pay the old dividend rate of 3.25 cents a share on April 27 to holders of record on April 13. Pep Boys added Thomas G. Stemberg, chairman and...
NEWS
December 2, 1992
When a printing company offers to do a job for less than a city department that uses 50-cent-an-hour prison labor, it's little wonder the Rendell administration champs at the bit to move inefficiently produced government services into the hands of private businesses. Turning to the private sector, though, has proven to be a tough slog for a mayor who figures there's $30 million in potential savings from having private firms compete to perform city work. As Inquirer staff writer Vernon Loeb detailed last week, none of the 20 city services targeted for privatization has been handed over to private firms so far. Few comparisons are as stark as the one on printing with prison labor - cited by the city's Purchasing Department as proof that its own print shop is costly and antiquated.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Managers from 29 Eastern Montgomery County towns have expressed interest in a plan to put inmates from the county prison in Eagleville to work at seasonal jobs with local governments. Representatives of the Montgomery County Consortium, an organization of managers from the 29 towns, gave East Norriton officials the word to continue negotiating this week with a company that has proposed to put the plan into action. The Florida-based company, Labor World, opened an office in Norristown last year.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By John Monk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
China is secretly engaged in harvesting organs from executed prisoners to raise money for a cash-strapped society, human rights advocates and Chinese dissidents said yesterday. "Anybody in this world needing an organ transplant can catch a plane to mainland China, present $30,000 in cash - U.S. money - and receive a new organ within hours," said Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. Helms, who in recent years has criticized China's use of prison labor to produce exports, is waging an uphill battle against renewal of China's favorable trading status with the United States.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
China's use of prison labor As Mayor Nutter forges relations with Chinese industry, and as Philadelphians look to China for models of development, everyone should be aware that many Chinese factories are in fact forced labor camps ("Nutter gets to know sister city," Monday). These camps, called laogai , hold millions of people who have been arrested for petty crimes, political offenses, or no wrongdoing at all. Laborers work for no pay, often for years, without any means of communication with life outside the camp.
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NEWS
December 7, 2012
China's use of prison labor As Mayor Nutter forges relations with Chinese industry, and as Philadelphians look to China for models of development, everyone should be aware that many Chinese factories are in fact forced labor camps ("Nutter gets to know sister city," Monday). These camps, called laogai , hold millions of people who have been arrested for petty crimes, political offenses, or no wrongdoing at all. Laborers work for no pay, often for years, without any means of communication with life outside the camp.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012 | By Frank Jordans, Associated Press
BERLIN - Swedish furniture giant Ikea, whose U.S. headquarters is in Conshohocken, expressed regret Friday that it benefited from the use of forced prison labor by some of its suppliers in communist East Germany more than two decades ago. The company released an independent report showing that East German prisoners, among them many political dissidents, were involved in the manufacture of goods supplied to Ikea 25 to 30 years ago. The report concluded...
NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Juan O. Tamayo, McClatchy Newspapers
MIAMI - The Cuban government-owned enterprise Provari is known on the island for making everything from bricks and construction blocks to mattresses, tourist handicrafts, and the insecticide Lomate - "I Killed It. " What is less well known is that the vast majority of its workers are prison inmates - what dissidents denounce as "slave laborers" who work with few safety protections and receive meager wages or are not paid at all. Prison labor...
NEWS
February 9, 2005 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Facing a $4 billion budget shortfall, the Codey administration is looking for ways to save money, and nothing is too small to merit consideration. Does a state office need new upholstery for its furniture? asked a Codey aide in a memo yesterday to top officials across state government. The solution: inmate labor. "Have it reupholstered by the Corrections Department," wrote Diane Legreide, chief of management and operations for acting Gov. Richard J. Codey. The suggestion was among various cost-cutting measures listed in the memo, which was distributed to several news organizations on a day when Republicans blasted Democrats for the state's budget woes.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A nonprofit housing provider plans to break ground Wednesday for eight single-family homes in Mount Holly that will be built by state prison inmates. The project is unusual in several ways, officials said. Building and selling homes is a new method of doing business for Kent R. Pipes, who is executive director of the Salt & Light Co., a Christian nonprofit group based in Mount Holly. The one-story, freestanding homes will feature studs of recycled steel instead of wood, which Pipes said require less know-how to build and less long-term maintenance.
NEWS
April 12, 2000 | By Ken Moritsugu, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Seven years after losing its battle against the North American Free Trade Agreement, organized labor is back - with a new strategy and some new allies. At noon today, labor leaders expect 15,000 union members to rally on Capitol Hill against legislation that would expand U.S. trade with China. The bill's defeat would be a severe setback for President Clinton, who hopes to pave the way for China's entry into the World Trade Organization. The rally reflects a major shift in labor's trade tactics, one that grew out of the NAFTA debate, in which unions found allies among environmentalists and others opposed to the trade agreement with Mexico and Canada.
NEWS
November 13, 1997 | By Adrienne Lu, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fifty years ago, Harry Wu was a carefree Jesuit school student living in the wealthy suburbs of Shanghai. He cared more about baseball and girls than politics. This week, before an audience at the Hill School, the human-rights activist and Chinese dissident, 60, reflected on the harrowing experiences he has lived through since his comfortable childhood. Some Americans may remember Wu as the man who exposed prison labor in China by smuggling video cameras into prisons for a 60 Minutes expose.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | By Kathy Boccella, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hugo Boss, the German menswear giant renowned for its pricey tapered suits, acknowledged yesterday that the company probably used forced labor to manufacture the despised brown-and-black uniforms of Hitler's Nazi elite during World War II. Spokeswoman Monika Steilen said the company has no records from that time but it was "very likely" that Nazis were among the international fashion house's earliest customers. "It was a clothing factory then that manufactured work clothes, raincoats and uniforms.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | By Drew Weaver, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Managers from 29 Eastern Montgomery County towns have expressed interest in a plan to put inmates from the county prison in Eagleville to work at seasonal jobs with local governments. Representatives of the Montgomery County Consortium, an organization of managers from the 29 towns, gave East Norriton officials the word to continue negotiating this week with a company that has proposed to put the plan into action. The Florida-based company, Labor World, opened an office in Norristown last year.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By John Monk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
China is secretly engaged in harvesting organs from executed prisoners to raise money for a cash-strapped society, human rights advocates and Chinese dissidents said yesterday. "Anybody in this world needing an organ transplant can catch a plane to mainland China, present $30,000 in cash - U.S. money - and receive a new organ within hours," said Sen. Jesse Helms (R., N.C.), chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee. Helms, who in recent years has criticized China's use of prison labor to produce exports, is waging an uphill battle against renewal of China's favorable trading status with the United States.
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