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Pritzker Prize

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LIVING
April 19, 2000 | By James S. Russell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rem Koolhaas, an architect born and based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, has been named the winner of this year's Pritzker Prize, often referred to as architecture's Nobel. Koolhaas, practicing with his firm OMA, is considered one of the world's most influential architects. The Pritzker Prize, established by the late Jay A. Pritzker, a Chicago buisnessman, was first presented in 1979. It is intended to recognize the contributions of a living architect. Laureates receive a bronze medallion and $100,000.
NEWS
March 21, 2005 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Architecture's most coveted award, the Pritzker Prize, will go this year to Thom Mayne, an edgy Los Angeles designer whose work exemplifies the innovative, future-embracing spirit of Southern California, the prize committee announced. In choosing Mayne for its 2005 award, the Chicago-based Pritzker Prize committee seems to be certifying California and the West Coast as the most exciting region for American architecture at this moment. Although Mayne, 61, is less well-known than his fellow Angeleno Frank Gehry, he has just completed two high-profile, convention-busting California projects and has commissions for several more.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Twenty-two years later, the omission still rankles Philadelphia architect Denise Scott Brown. She and her husband, Robert Venturi, designed their projects together. They wrote several paradigm-shifting books together. They taught their influential studio classes together. But when the winner of architecture's most prestigious prize was announced in 1991, it was only Venturi who was honored. Scott Brown, now 82, has never been one to be silent about her treatment by the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury, but her pointed remarks last month at a conference in London have touched a nerve as never before.
NEWS
March 22, 2004 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Architecture, a profession whose stars are largely old men of Western European descent, is about to give its most prestigious award to a 53-year-old Iraqi-born woman. Zaha Hadid will receive the $100,000 Pritzker Architecture Prize on May 31 in St. Petersburg, Russia, according to the Chicago-based foundation that administers the awards. In choosing Hadid, a British citizen who has lived in London for 30 years, the Pritzker Prize jurors have held to their practice of choosing architects whose influence stems as much from their theories as from their buildings.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1950, a Princeton University student named Robert Venturi devoted his master's thesis to imagining a new chapel for his alma mater, Episcopal Academy. It was a beautiful building, with neutral stone walls highlighted by weathered metal - the modern equivalent of copper gargoyles. "Darn good," said Venturi. Pity it was never built. Now, nearly 60 years later, fate has come full circle: Venturi, a world-renowned architect in Philadelphia, has been chosen to design the chapel at Episcopal's new campus in Newtown Square.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This time, Denise Scott Brown's name is on the prize. After decades of being overlooked and even openly scorned by the architecture profession, Philadelphia's best-known female designer was singled out Wednesday by the American Institute of Architects as cowinner of its prestigious Gold Medal, together with her husband and partner, Robert Venturi. An author of the groundbreaking study Learning From Las Vegas , she is the first living woman to win the medal for career achievement since the AIA began handing out the prize in 1907.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1992 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Renowned Philadelphia architect Robert Venturi has landed a plum assignment to design a $30 million library for Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, the school announced yesterday. Besides being a sizable commission in a time of reduced construction activity, the Dartmouth library also is a chance for him and his firm, Venturi Scott Brown & Associates, to do another relatively high-profile project. "It's a very important site," said Gordon Dewitt, Dartmouth's director of facilities planning.
NEWS
October 2, 2004
A home in the suburbs has been found for the old Liberty Bell pavilion. That's good news, especially for architectural enthusiasts who feared demolition would be the fate of the glass and steel edifice designed in 1976 by Romaldo Giurgola. Some citizens, who have good reason to favor the more grandly designed Liberty Bell Center that opened last year, are just glad to see a plan to move the pavilion to the American College campus in Bryn Mawr. To them, the pavilion more resembled a bank branch, or drive-up fast-food venue.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Kenzo Tange, 73, the elder statesman of Japanese postwar architecture, was named the ninth winner of the Pritzker Prize - architecture's version of the Nobel Prize - at ceremonies yesterday at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Tange emerged during the 1950s as a prolific architectural practitioner and as an influential teacher and writer. He was preoccupied with the effort to incorporate the latest technology and ideas from Europe and America into Japanese tradition. He also was among the first architects to argue that society has become increasingly based on the generating, organizing, storing and retrieving of information and to attempt to reflect that view in buildings and cities.
NEWS
March 29, 2007 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
In a sign that environmental sustainability is more than a passing architectural fad, the Pritzker Prize jury yesterday announced that it will give this year's award to Richard Rogers, who has challenged the profession to help combat the world's ecological problems. Rogers, 73, is widely admired for turning architecture inside out with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and Lloyds of London, both of which proudly wear their major pipe systems on their exteriors.
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NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
This time, Denise Scott Brown's name is on the prize. After decades of being overlooked and even openly scorned by the architecture profession, Philadelphia's best-known female designer was singled out Wednesday by the American Institute of Architects as cowinner of its prestigious Gold Medal, together with her husband and partner, Robert Venturi. An author of the groundbreaking study Learning From Las Vegas , she is the first living woman to win the medal for career achievement since the AIA began handing out the prize in 1907.
NEWS
April 3, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Twenty-two years later, the omission still rankles Philadelphia architect Denise Scott Brown. She and her husband, Robert Venturi, designed their projects together. They wrote several paradigm-shifting books together. They taught their influential studio classes together. But when the winner of architecture's most prestigious prize was announced in 1991, it was only Venturi who was honored. Scott Brown, now 82, has never been one to be silent about her treatment by the Pritzker Architecture Prize jury, but her pointed remarks last month at a conference in London have touched a nerve as never before.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popkin, For The Inquirer
In the late 1990s, when Cincinnati's Contemporary Arts Center was seeking an architect to design its new, high-visibility museum, it considered a proposal from Zaha Hadid, the Baghdad-born, London-based architect who is being honored Saturday night with the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Collab Design Excellence Award. Hadid had completed only a few commissions at the time and her potent, generative architecture, which appears at once prehistoric and space age, was relatively unknown in the United States.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1950, a Princeton University student named Robert Venturi devoted his master's thesis to imagining a new chapel for his alma mater, Episcopal Academy. It was a beautiful building, with neutral stone walls highlighted by weathered metal - the modern equivalent of copper gargoyles. "Darn good," said Venturi. Pity it was never built. Now, nearly 60 years later, fate has come full circle: Venturi, a world-renowned architect in Philadelphia, has been chosen to design the chapel at Episcopal's new campus in Newtown Square.
NEWS
March 29, 2007 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
In a sign that environmental sustainability is more than a passing architectural fad, the Pritzker Prize jury yesterday announced that it will give this year's award to Richard Rogers, who has challenged the profession to help combat the world's ecological problems. Rogers, 73, is widely admired for turning architecture inside out with buildings such as the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and Lloyds of London, both of which proudly wear their major pipe systems on their exteriors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Your brain had better be firing on all cylinders when you descend the cloverleaf ramps of the new Mercedes-Benz Museum here. It's not just that the building's Dutch architects, UN Studio, have devised a wickedly complex circulation system inspired by the interlocking spirals of DNA's double helix. You're repeatedly forced to make choices about your route as you progress through the exhibits, spanning 123 years of Mercedes design. One museum ramp follows the path of world history and technological development.
LIVING
August 4, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
It's hard not to get carried away by the Zaha Hadid story: The Iraqi-born architect spends two decades laboring in obscurity - painting, developing her complex theories, and building almost nothing. Then one day, the call comes from a small Cincinnati art museum. Her tiny gallery design is lavishly praised. Hadid becomes the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize, architecture's highest honor. A natural-born diva, she is transformed overnight into a jet-setting, Issey Miyake-wearing celebrity designer and showered with commissions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2006 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
American sports arenas have gotten themselves in a rut over the last two decades. Most have been designed by big stadium specialists, and the architecture tends to come in two flavors: If it's a baseball park, the building relies on red brick and nostalgia. The obligatory style of football stadiums is edgier, but their strutting, steel-boned exteriors render them virtually indistinguishable from an airport terminal. So when Germany and Costa Rica face off Friday in the opening game of the World Cup, American fans may have trouble recognizing Munich's Allianz Arena as a sporting venue.
NEWS
August 23, 2005 | Harris Steinberg
Harris Steinberg is a member of the Philadelphia Historical Commission With the last hurdle now cleared by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, the Barnes Foundation is poised to begin picking up stakes in Merion and moving much of its collection to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. Attention now turns to the design of the new building. And what a glorious opportunity to create a world-class design that will further a vision of the Parkway as a dynamic 21st-century urban boulevard.
NEWS
March 21, 2005 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Architecture's most coveted award, the Pritzker Prize, will go this year to Thom Mayne, an edgy Los Angeles designer whose work exemplifies the innovative, future-embracing spirit of Southern California, the prize committee announced. In choosing Mayne for its 2005 award, the Chicago-based Pritzker Prize committee seems to be certifying California and the West Coast as the most exciting region for American architecture at this moment. Although Mayne, 61, is less well-known than his fellow Angeleno Frank Gehry, he has just completed two high-profile, convention-busting California projects and has commissions for several more.
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