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NEWS
May 17, 2000
What do you call a household with a computer and a teenager? An open book. While Mom and Dad are pushing bank statements and canceled checks through a paper shredder as a safeguard, chances are junior is in the next room shredding the family's privacy - online, bit by byte. A new study shows that teens say it's fine - cool, even - to hand over personal details in return for the prizes offered by online marketers. Nearly two out of three teens will name favorite stores. A third will reveal their allowances, and whether their parents talk politics at home.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Daniel S. Greenberg
Of the many forecasts for the next century, a safe one is that privacy will be a goner. The computer is already leading to that in medical recordkeeping, personal buying patterns and even in tracking our physical whereabouts. And we're only in the beginning stages of keeping tabs on everything about everyone. Every now and then, there's an outrageous assault on privacy, such as the recent surfacing of thousands of AIDS patients' names from a supposedly secure filing system.
NEWS
August 16, 2005 | CAROL TOWARNICKY
TELL ME again, what's wrong with "judicial activism"? In recent years, those have become dirty words, with even liberals attacking conservative judges for being too "activist. " But thank goodness that, 40 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court didn't shrink from what some people call activism when it overturned a Connecticut law that made it a crime for married couples to use contraception - or for others to help them get it. In Griswold v. Connecticut, the court said that guarantees inferred, although not precisely stated, in several constitutional amendments make up a "right to privacy," a right to be protected from government interference in intimate decisions.
NEWS
October 29, 2007 | By ANN ROSEN SPECTOR
DREW Barrymore makes out enthusiastically, vigorously, and in public with every new man in her life . . . those she marries and those she doesn't. J-Lo has trumpeted every detail of her life with numerous soul mates (three husbands and several assorted exes) but is keeping her apparent pregnancy private. Britney/Lindsey/Nicole/Paris (are they really separate people?) ensure that the paparazzi are there at (practically) every door opening to take photos of them with and without panties, but proclaim their desire for "privacy" as they enter/exit/re-enter rehab and jail.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
WORDS ARE powerful. Sometimes, they give us a glimpse into a person's soul, translate unexpressed thoughts into cogent principles or simply entertain us for a few hours. But sometimes words are insidious. Taken out of context, given a spin, they can assume a life of their own. Ask the Dixie Chicks. A few poorly chosen comments from their lead singer about her disaffection with the president, and the dazzling darlings of country drew the ire of patriots and music lovers across the nation.
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | By RICHARD COHEN
Not too long ago, I went to buy some speaker wire - a total purchase of less than $10, as I recall. The clerk took my cash and then did the usual fandango on the computer. Lots of keys were punched. "The last four digits of your telephone number, please," he asked. No way, said I. The clerk was insistent. The computer demanded it, he said. Here, in a single incident, was much that I consider evil in the world. Here, in other words, was someone taking orders from a machine and insisting I do the same.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two companies yesterday scrapped plans to sell a computer program that could reveal detailed information about the shopping and personal habits of 120 million Americans. A person or business using the program would have been able to identify couples, say, who might be interested in financial services. Or the names and addresses of affluent elderly widows. Or single women over 35 years old living in a particular city. But after a maelstrom of complaints - and 30,000 requests from consumers asking to be deleted from the database - Lotus Development Corp.
NEWS
February 11, 2010 | By Catherine Crump
If you own a cell phone, you should care about the outcome of a case scheduled to be argued in federal appeals court in Philadelphia tomorrow. It could well decide whether the government can use your cell phone to track you - even if it hasn't shown probable cause to believe it will turn up evidence of a crime. The American Civil Liberties Union, the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Center for Democracy and Technology will ask the court to require that the government at least show probable cause before it can track your whereabouts.
NEWS
March 15, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
If someone raps on your door or rings your bell, the sensible response is to ask: "Who's there?" There's nothing impolite about the question. You have a right to know who is standing outside your door, and why, before you open it. Or if you have a peephole, you can look out. If a Girl Scout is standing there with boxes of cookies, you can safely slide the bolt. On the other hand, if you see a man with a ski mask over his face, it would be wise to grab the phone and call the cops.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Alan Westin, 83, one of the first and most widely respected scholars to explore the issues of privacy in the information age, died Monday at a hospice in Saddle River, N.J. He had cancer, his son, Jeremy Westin, said. A professor of public law and government, Mr. Westin taught at Columbia University for nearly four decades. Through his prolific academic writing and frequent media appearances, he became nationally known as one of the most knowledgeable, prescient, and reasonable voices on privacy questions in modern society.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do we have a "right to be forgotten"? Nope. They do now in Europe. But will this "right" cross the Atlantic? Not likely. That doesn't mean people aren't pretzeled with indignation about it. The question is whether we have a right to get search services like Google and Yahoo to delete or suppress information - to "forget" us. On May 13, the European Court of Justice ruled yes. It's been a hot issue for years over there. In 2010, a Spanish lawyer sued to get Google to take down pages showing a 1998 auction notice on his home.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Frank Diamond, For The Inquirer
For Nina McDaniel, one of the worst moments of her seven-year struggle to get her son Michael committed to a mental institution for a sustained time was Valentine's Day 2011. The McDaniel family, who live in Reading, had gone bowling. "He couldn't handle being out in the community and I volunteered to bring him back home," McDaniel said. "As I was driving, he took my right hand off the steering wheel and he said, 'Mom, please,' and he put my hand on his heart and said, 'Take a gun and shoot me, because I can't take it. I don't know what's real and what's not real anymore.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
After a litany of startling revelations about the National Security Agency's bulk collection of e-mail and more, most Americans will be surprised that their electronic communications are in some ways more vulnerable to snooping by garden-variety government officials. A woefully outdated law allows agencies ranging from local district attorneys' offices to the IRS to pore over the contents of e-mails without seeking court approval. The law governing e-mail access dates back to the primordial age of the technology, in 1986, when the few who used it had to download messages onto their gigantic home or office computers.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
How strange and yet fitting that, as the World Wide Web clicked past the quarter-century mark last week, the technology world fixated on a virtual appearance by expatriate digital-privacy vigilante Edward Snowden - the National Security Agency leaker's face looming like Big Brother from huge screens at the annual Austin, Texas, tech-arts extravaganza South by Southwest. Snowden rightly decried the pervasive government snooping that's driving proposed reforms at the massive spy agency.
NEWS
January 1, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System revealed Monday that some patients' privacy was accidentally breached because of misprinted bills. One of Penn's billing vendors, RevSpring of Wixom, Mich., had a malfunction in its printing operation. As a result, some patients received bills containing both their own correct information and an unrelated patient's information on the reverse side of the statement. The inadvertent information included the unrelated patient's name, physician, types of services and tests, and amount owed.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Sometimes, it hits you after you've openly posted comments about a product or a politician. Other times, it strikes you after an online transaction, such as buying an airline or concert ticket, or a Web search about a disease or a dance step. Twerking fans, you know who you are. Every day, those of us who live increasingly online are adding to a digital footprint others can access. And a study due out Thursday from the Pew Research Center suggests that many of us are increasingly wary of that prospect and are trying to regain a measure of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | BY HOWARD GENSLER, Daily News Staff Writer gensleh@phillynews.com, 215-854-5678
FOR A MOVIE STAR, Eric Bana is largely a private person, living away from the Hollywood spotlight with his wife and two children in his native Australia. So, although he works frequently ("Black Hawk Down," "Hulk," "Munich," "Star Trek," etc.), he does not choose his projects lightly. A simple studio meeting means a 19-hour flight each way. Finding the right projects, therefore, often depends on timing and luck as much as talent, and that's how Bana ended up starring in "Closed Circuit," a movie about, among many things, privacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
REGULAR READERS of this column know that Tattle is no fan of the "faux reality" TV empire built on the breasts and buttocks of Kim Kardashian and her whiny, overindulged family. But no matter how much attention she craves, no one except her doctors should have access to her medical records. So it's encouraging that hospital-to-the-stars Cedars-Sinai has reportedly fired half-a-dozen employees, according to the Los Angeles Times , for hacking patient records, including those of North 's mama.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
LONDON - Outside the private Lindo Wing of St. Mary's Hospital, the global media hordes on Royal Baby Watch have marked their turf with duct tape and stepladders. But starved for material in a world where Mother Nature and Buckingham Palace are the last two holdouts from the 24-hour news cycle, loitering reporters trying to set a tone of breathless anticipation have resorted to interviewing each other. Perhaps nothing could be more appropriate. As Prince William and his wife, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, prepare to carve out a new life for their budding family in the glare of the spotlight, the press is poised to be a major part of the story.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
D EAR ABBY: When we married, we both drank and smoked. My husband quit smoking five years ago, and I have continued to smoke off and on. If he catches me with a cigarette it becomes an argument, and it's either I quit or we're done! I love my husband, but I don't see the big deal if I smoke a cigarette. He sometimes makes me feel like a teenager hiding it from my parents! Any advice? - Closet Smoker in Wisconsin DEAR SMOKER: Surely you know that smoking isn't good for you, and it upsets your husband because he loves you. This is less about a contest of wills than the fact that you are addicted to nicotine and can't stop using.
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