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Privacy Policy

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BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
PARIS - European regulators have asked Google to clarify its new privacy policy and make it easier for users to opt out of data collection because of concerns that the Web giant may be gathering too much data and holding it too long. France's data-protection agency led a European investigation into Google's new unified privacy policy, which replaces individual policies for its search, e-mail, and other services and regulates how it uses the personal data it collects. The policy allows Google to combine data collected from one person using its disparate services, from Gmail to YouTube.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2000 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you assume your personal data are safe at a Web site with a fancy "privacy policy," then, privacy experts say, one thing about you is already exposed: You're gullible. "Privacy policies are not worth the pixels they're printed on," said Fred Davis, a privacy advocate whose California company, Lumeria Inc., is among many new firms offering services to shield computer users from online snoops. Many Web businesses have hoped that privacy policies, voluntary statements listing how their sites intend to use the information they collect about visitors, would prove that self-regulation, rather than government intervention, can ensure the safety of personal data online.
NEWS
June 20, 2002 | By Lou D'Ambrosio
You wouldn't walk around the King of Prussia Mall with your Social Security number tattooed on your forehead. But in the virtual world, where disclosure of personal information is often a prerequisite for shopping, consumers may feel they are being asked to do just that. Consumers have become increasingly savvy about how businesses are using information disclosed on the Web. In fact, a recent study showed 75 percent of consumers are now wary of shopping online because of such disclosure fears, which is costing business roughly $15 billion annually.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Privacy in the electronic age seems to be vanishing, with the introduction of Google's new privacy policy March 1, telling users that for their "convenience" all their Internet searches, data, and contacts will be shared across various platforms. Then came revelations about how electronic applications on your computer, smartphone, and tablet may copy your personal photo files without your permission. Staff writer Melissa Dribben spoke about the loss of control over personal information with Jeffrey Rosen, law professor at George Washington University and co-editor of "Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Thanks to increasing numbers of financial service Web sites, consumers have more options than ever when it comes to finding a loan through the Internet. But the downside to all that information can make the process of finding the right online lender feel like a daunting task. LendingTree.com offers the following guidelines to get buyers started: Use Web sites with a secure mode of data transfer. Check for sites that encrypt your information using Secure Sockets Layer, or SSL, technology.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Budget-computer-game maker eGames Inc., of Langhorne, said yesterday that it would stop using software that surreptitiously collects information about users' computers and the Web advertising they click on. The office of Michigan Attorney General Jennifer M. Granholm threatened legal action against eGames in September over the Pennsylvania company's use of a software utility called TimeSink, from Conducent Inc., Sterling, Va. Granholm said use...
BUSINESS
November 12, 2003 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The information that job seekers give to potential employers and job boards to help them find work can make them a target for unsolicited marketing, or, worse, identity theft. "Identity theft is alive and well in the job-search industry because the data is so rich," said Pam Dixon, principal investigator and author of the "2003 Job Search Privacy Study" released yesterday by World Privacy Forum, a foundation in California. "Resumes are the new chattle," said Dixon, an author who has been studying and writing about online job searches since the 1990s.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2002 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even after years of trial and error - and estimates of record-breaking online shopping this holiday season - too many business Web sites still don't get it right, Web-design guru Jakob Nielsen says. Nielsen, the author of multiple books on software interfaces and a principal at the Nielsen Norman Group in Fremont, Calif., has released his top 10 Web-design mistakes of 2002. Nielsen said a lot of errors of years past - such as bothersome animated introductions, and pages that don't contain a link back to a site's home page - are disappearing.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Robert Channick, Chicago Tribune
When Microsoft Corp. unveils a new version of its Web browser, users will be able to traverse sites as always, but with one significant difference: The company plans to make "do not track" the default setting. That means Internet Explorer 10, expected to launch in the fall, will automatically curtail the personal information garnered as users surf - data shared by third-party companies to serve up targeted advertising. The move puts Microsoft out in front of a process to set new Internet privacy standards - and puts it at odds with the $31 billion online advertising industry.
NEWS
March 26, 2008 | DEBORAH LEAVY
THE GOVERNOR of New York was caught patronizing a high-end hooker. Although she used a fake name, she was soon identified and the details of her MySpace profile were repeated in endless loops on television and the Internet. It also turns out that she'd bared her breasts for some "Girls Gone Wild" videos, which was going to save that operation the million dollars it was going to pay her for what she'd already done for free - until it turned out that she was underage (17) when she did it. Her father came forward and gave an interview.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
PARIS - European regulators have asked Google to clarify its new privacy policy and make it easier for users to opt out of data collection because of concerns that the Web giant may be gathering too much data and holding it too long. France's data-protection agency led a European investigation into Google's new unified privacy policy, which replaces individual policies for its search, e-mail, and other services and regulates how it uses the personal data it collects. The policy allows Google to combine data collected from one person using its disparate services, from Gmail to YouTube.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By Robert Channick, Chicago Tribune
When Microsoft Corp. unveils a new version of its Web browser, users will be able to traverse sites as always, but with one significant difference: The company plans to make "do not track" the default setting. That means Internet Explorer 10, expected to launch in the fall, will automatically curtail the personal information garnered as users surf - data shared by third-party companies to serve up targeted advertising. The move puts Microsoft out in front of a process to set new Internet privacy standards - and puts it at odds with the $31 billion online advertising industry.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
Privacy in the electronic age seems to be vanishing, with the introduction of Google's new privacy policy March 1, telling users that for their "convenience" all their Internet searches, data, and contacts will be shared across various platforms. Then came revelations about how electronic applications on your computer, smartphone, and tablet may copy your personal photo files without your permission. Staff writer Melissa Dribben spoke about the loss of control over personal information with Jeffrey Rosen, law professor at George Washington University and co-editor of "Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Gabriele Steinhauser, Associated Press
BRUSSELS - The European Union's data protection authorities have asked Google to delay the rollout of its new privacy policy until they have verified that it doesn't break the bloc's laws. Google publicized its new privacy rules - which regulate how the Web giant uses the enormous amounts of personal data it collects through its search engine, e-mail and other services - with much fanfare last week. Since then, it has launched a huge publicity campaign informing its users around the globe of the new policy, which is set to come into force on March 1. But that launch date may now be under threat.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Facebook knows your likes and dislikes, not to mention who your friends are. Amazon knows your taste in books and anything else you shop for at its online superstore. Google knows what you research or wonder about. And other websites - including this one, if you're reading at Philly.com - can track your browsing and clicking habits as you navigate from site to site in the same ad networks. But what does your wireless carrier or Internet provider know about you? Potentially, all those same things and much, much more - which is why changes in Verizon and Verizon Wireless' data policies are stirring concern among privacy advocates and members of Congress.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Shopping online recently for life insurance gave me a disturbing window into websites' "privacy policies," as they are quaintly called, and drove me back for now to a traditional, off-line agent. The widely touted website where I started seemed to have modest plans for any data I entered. Essentially, it promised to use my personal information only to provide quotes or other product pitches, send me surveys, answer my requests, or offer me information "on products and services offered by our select business partners.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Mike Swift, San Jose Mercury News (MCT)
SAN JOSE, Calif. - Facebook is rewriting its privacy policy in plainspoken English, and preparing new tools to show users how their personal data is used. "We're really an innovative, cutting-edge company on a lot of different fronts, and I think we feel like, 'Why can't we be innovators in privacy, as well?' " Michael Richter, Facebook's chief privacy counsel, said in an interview this week. "The company cares about privacy. " Nevertheless, some critics say Facebook is still not telling consumers enough about what it knows about them, and about how the social network and its business partners use that information.
NEWS
March 26, 2008 | DEBORAH LEAVY
THE GOVERNOR of New York was caught patronizing a high-end hooker. Although she used a fake name, she was soon identified and the details of her MySpace profile were repeated in endless loops on television and the Internet. It also turns out that she'd bared her breasts for some "Girls Gone Wild" videos, which was going to save that operation the million dollars it was going to pay her for what she'd already done for free - until it turned out that she was underage (17) when she did it. Her father came forward and gave an interview.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Thanks to increasing numbers of financial service Web sites, consumers have more options than ever when it comes to finding a loan through the Internet. But the downside to all that information can make the process of finding the right online lender feel like a daunting task. LendingTree.com offers the following guidelines to get buyers started: Use Web sites with a secure mode of data transfer. Check for sites that encrypt your information using Secure Sockets Layer, or SSL, technology.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2003 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The information that job seekers give to potential employers and job boards to help them find work can make them a target for unsolicited marketing, or, worse, identity theft. "Identity theft is alive and well in the job-search industry because the data is so rich," said Pam Dixon, principal investigator and author of the "2003 Job Search Privacy Study" released yesterday by World Privacy Forum, a foundation in California. "Resumes are the new chattle," said Dixon, an author who has been studying and writing about online job searches since the 1990s.
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