CollectionsPrivacy
IN THE NEWS

Privacy

NEWS
July 8, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
In some ways, the Supreme Court's 5-4 decision upholding Georgia's sodomy law defies analysis. As Oscar Hammerstein wrote: "Who can explain it? Who can tell you why? Fools give you reasons. Wise men never try. " Who can explain a Supreme Court that in one case finds a constitutional right to privacy which allows a woman to abort the product of a heterosexual act between herself and a man, yet finds no such right to privacy between members of the same sex performing acts of sodomy which do not result in such a product?
NEWS
February 16, 1987 | BY LOU CANNON
When Ronald Reagan began his political career in 1966 by running for governor of California, he insisted he was not really a politician. Career politicians with happy illusions about the high-mindedness of their profession were annoyed by his refusal to be one of them. Journalists tended to dismiss Reagan's assertion as a confession of ignorance or a ploy by his managers to make a virtue of his inexperience. Certainly, there was an element of calculation in Reagan's refusal to accept the "politician" label.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | By Richard A. Oppel Jr., Special to The Inquirer
Nearly two decades have passed since William C. Massinger, a prominent Chester County lawyer and former assistant district attorney, was accused of assaulting and raping his former girlfriend. No charges were ever filed. But a disciplinary board of the local bar association initiated an inquiry into Massinger's conduct, finding substance in most of the allegations. The panel recommended that he be censured publicly. Instead, five Common Pleas Court judges in West Chester issued a private reprimand, ordered the board's findings secret and stored them away in the basement of the county courthouse.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Supreme Court upheld a lower-court ruling Tuesday that the state constitution does not give people a right to privacy when it comes to their home addresses, clarifying a matter that has emerged as a major point of dispute under the Right-to-Know Law. The justices gave their approval to a January 2012 Commonwealth Court decision throwing out a lawsuit by Mel M. Marin, a prospective congressional candidate who would not...
SPORTS
December 4, 2012 | Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Breaking their silence for the first time, the family of the woman shot and killed by Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher said Monday their "hearts are truly broken" and asked for privacy while they grieve the loss of two loved ones. Belcher shot and killed his 22-year-old girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins, at their Kansas City home Saturday before driving to Arrowhead Stadium, where Belcher committed suicide in the practice facility's parking lot, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: How much privacy should a married couple, of 20-plus years, have from each other? Do you believe a spouse should have private passwords to computer, e-mail, phone, Facebook, etc., and private conversations on the phone? This is a very big bone of contention between my spouse and me, and I would really like your unbiased opinion. Answer: I think the details of passwords, etc., matter less than what you do with them and how trustworthy each of you thinks the other is. Four examples: 1. Couples can have private conversations and passwords they don't share, just because they believe in privacy and individuality, even if they have nothing to hide.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | BY LOU CANNON
The Supreme Court discovered the computer age last week, while delivering a body blow to the Freedom of Information Act, and demonstrating the growing conflict between an individual's "right to privacy" and the people's "right to know. " In a unanimous decision, the high court ruled that individual criminal histories maintained by the FBI are not subject to disclosure under the 1966 freedom-of-information law. The sweeping ruling surprised even the Justice Department, which had made the more limited argument that decisions on when to release such records should be made on a case-by-case basis.
NEWS
November 14, 2007
The editorial "Keep e?mail o-p-e-n" (Inquirer, Nov. 11) criticized my position excluding e-mail from the definition of public records in the Open Records legislation currently under consideration by the General Assembly. First, the headline implies that e-mail are considered public records in Pennsylvania - they are not. But they are subject to review in Pennsylvania pursuant to a court order. E-mail are a quick, efficient form of communication which have, to some degree, become a substitute for phone calls, and many people have an expectation of privacy in their e-mail correspondence.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | By Robin Palley
Privacy is dead. And as a nation, we're not sure what that means. Lives are on public display with or without our consent. Heck, even the President's sex life is on the air - though blessedly not on film yet. (We won't count the oft-rerun reception line hugs of Monica Lewinsky, magnified a thousand-fold by endless repetition on the airwaves.) Surveillance cameras record our comings and goings in the hallways of our workplaces, seats of government, halls of healing, day-care centers, our grand public spaces.
NEWS
September 22, 1987 | BY ADRIAN LEE
With talk of "emanations" and "penumbras" and "free-floating rights to privacy," the Robert Bork hearings sound like static from Cloud 9. Emanations and penumbras, we'll get to. But first that "free-floating privacy" of the bedroom; it's what the Senate free-for-all is all about. Is there really an all-sheltering niche in the Constitution for whatever goes on behind closed doors, in private? Or is the niche merely what Bork calls the product of a liberal high court's fevered imagination - unanchored rights floating free as a "cloud.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|