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Privacy

NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Joshua Freed, Associated Press
Those airport scanners with their all-too-revealing body images will soon be going away. The Transportation Security Administration says the scanners that used a low-dose X-ray will be gone by June because the company that makes them can't fix the privacy issues. The other airport body scanners, which produce a generic outline instead of a naked image, are staying. The government rapidly stepped up its use of body scanners after a man slipped explosives onto a flight bound for Detroit on Christmas Day in 2009.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
While the courts have said police can't slap a tracking device on a suspect's car without a warrant, there's no law preventing advertisers and other businesses from logging every move made by someone with a smartphone. Far from fighting this privacy intrusion, millions of cellphone users actually help make it possible by enabling their phone's mobile tracking software with just the tap of a touchscreen. But the growing sophistication of the gadgets that Americans tote most places - including their bedsides each night - has triggered a welcome look by Washington policymakers at new privacy protections.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
How much privacy can anyone expect while surfing the Internet? How much special protection should be provided to children and their families? Those are key questions underlying a little-noticed proceeding in Washington that could have major reverberations for online commerce and the future of the Web: the first update in 12 years of rules enforcing the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). Industry and public-advocacy groups have been pushing hard - often at cross-purposes - over the update under way at the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012
Apps for smartphone privacy can hunt down malware, find a lost phone, hide files, and boost security for online accounts. All these are free, and most are for Android and Apple devices. Lookout by Lookout Inc. has useful, even entertaining functions that will check your phone for malicious software, tell you whether you're on a secure WiFi connection, and track down your device if it gets taken or misplaced. If your phone is lost or stolen, Lookout offers several options, though they require you to have GPS activated before the device goes missing.
SPORTS
December 4, 2012 | Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Breaking their silence for the first time, the family of the woman shot and killed by Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher said Monday their "hearts are truly broken" and asked for privacy while they grieve the loss of two loved ones. Belcher shot and killed his 22-year-old girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins, at their Kansas City home Saturday before driving to Arrowhead Stadium, where Belcher committed suicide in the practice facility's parking lot, police said.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
The Petraeus affair has helped Americans understand the sweeping power federal authorities have to snoop around in e-mail. Another way Americans may unknowingly expose their personal affairs to law-enforcement eyes is through their cellphones. In 2011, cellphone providers reported handing 1.3 million requests from law enforcement for data about customers, according to the New York Times. You might think that police would need a warrant to get at those records. Not so, at least as far as the U.S. Constitution is concerned.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like all tragedies, the Petraeus saga is a tale of how things get beyond your control. It began as a sexual affair that, if of questionable morality, was at least not illegal. But with the speed of e-mail, it shot out runners where no one could have predicted. The FBI investigated. A CIA head resigned. A big military nomination was frozen. Reputations and perhaps families were riven. E-mail was key. It's vulnerable to surveillance - even when you try to hide it, as Gen. David Petraeus and his biographer/paramour, Paula Broadwell, did. Petraeus and Broadwell used a clever ruse to hide their contact: They shared a Gmail account under a pseudonym.
NEWS
October 27, 2012 | By Jason Keyser, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The federal government is quietly removing full-body X-ray scanners from seven major airports and replacing them with a different type of machine that produces a cartoonlike outline instead of the naked images that have been compared to a virtual strip search. The Transportation Security Administration says it is making the switch in technology to speed up lines at crowded airports, not to ease passenger privacy concerns. But civil liberties groups hope the change signals that the equipment will eventually go to the scrap heap.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | Associated Press
PARIS - European regulators have asked Google to clarify its new privacy policy and make it easier for users to opt out of data collection because of concerns that the Web giant may be gathering too much data and holding it too long. France's data-protection agency led a European investigation into Google's new unified privacy policy, which replaces individual policies for its search, e-mail, and other services and regulates how it uses the personal data it collects. The policy allows Google to combine data collected from one person using its disparate services, from Gmail to YouTube.
NEWS
September 29, 2012 | By Joan Lowy, Associated Press
WASHINGTON — More than a third of Americans worry their privacy will suffer if drones like those used to spy on U.S. enemies overseas become the latest police tool for tracking suspected criminals at home, according to an Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll.   Congress has directed the Federal Aviation Administration to come up with safety regulations that will clear the way for routine domestic use of unmanned aircraft within the next three years. The government is under pressure from a wide range of interests to open U.S. skies to drones.
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