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Private Lives

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NEWS
August 30, 1998
How has the fascination with the private lives of public officials affected you? How will it affect the way you vote in the future? What you look for in a candidate? How you judge the news and commentaries you read or listen to? Send essays of 300 words by Sept. 11 to Community Voices/Private Lives to the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
One night in a Tokyo hotel room in 1929, unable to sleep, Noel Coward had a vision of Gertrude Lawrence in a ravishing dress. She "refused to go again until 4 a.m.," Coward wrote in his memoirs, "by which time Private Lives, title and all, had constructed itself. " Shortly afterward, in Hong Kong, the actor-playwright wrote out the play in four days, and, within months, he and "Gertie" were performing it in London's West End. Thus, seemingly without effort, was born one of the most exquisitely fashioned comedies in the English-speaking theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Noel Coward's delectable 1930 comedy Private Lives , now at the Walnut Street Theatre, is what every romcom aspires to be: laugh-out-loud funny, sexy, rambunctious, and complete with a happy ending preceded by bad behavior. Here are characters whose dialogue is clever and naughty as opposed to their contemporary versions, who often seem dopey and vulgar. The play requires everyone to be veddy, veddy English, knowing all the while that it is all veddy veddy. Here's the setup: Amanda (Kathleen Wallace)
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out of the blue, Janice Bone was fired. Two officials at the Ford Meter Box Co. in Wabash, Ind., where Bone had recently been promoted to payroll clerk, pulled her aside and escorted her from the plant. She was told not to return. The apparent reason: A company drug test found nicotine in her urine. Bone, it seems, was a smoker. Granted, she did not smoke on the job, but that really didn't matter to the Ford Meter Box Co. Its policy barred her from smoking at all. "I was very shocked.
NEWS
August 13, 1992
We can think of only one happy consequence regarding the silly, petty, demeaning flap over whether President Bush once upon a time trysted in a Swiss chalet with a female aide. It may cause, finally, the sleaze merchants in the media - and in the Bush campaign, as well - to sit down and shut up. We said it when Bill Clinton was hit by his "bimbo eruption" in New Hampshire, and we say it again now: The most telling standard of character for a candidate for public office is the conduct of his or her public life.
NEWS
February 21, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It's a tribute to the everlasting wit and wisdom of Private Lives that the play survives the production that opened last night at the Broadhurst Theatre. That's not to say that the tone, the world view, or the characters at the Broadhurst bear much resemblance to what Noel Coward had in mind when he wrote the play back in 1930. It is to say that even as I totted up the deficiencies of this revival, which stars Joan Collins and Simon Jones, I found myself laughing a lot more than seemed appropriate under the circumstances.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By Richard Cohen
A story told on the diplomatic circuit involves a married French diplomat who had an affair in Moscow with a female KGB agent. One day, her dour boss appeared at the Frenchman's doorstep with the usual scandalous pictures - a prelude to a blackmail demand. The diplomat studied the photos for a moment and then said, "I will take two of zees, three of zees and one of zees" - and with a nonchalant shrug closed the door. Americans have no such blase attitude toward extramarital sex. Accusations of such shenanigans tumbled Gary Hart from his perch as the Democratic front- runner to just another guy peddling a book in New York.
NEWS
September 3, 1997 | By LINDA CHAVEZ
The response of the American media to the death of Princess Diana seems not only excessive but grotesque. What is it about this young woman's brief life that could possibly justify the virtually nonstop coverage the mainstream news media have devoted to her death? The Sunday morning news programs could talk of little else. From ABC's This Week to CBS' 60 Minutes to CNN's Crossfire, the networks treated Diana's passing as if a head of state had died. In the hours following her death, cable news outlets ran round-the-clock coverage, with one network giving 15-minute "news updates" throughout the day. Another ran video footage of her 1981 wedding, itself a voyeuristic media orgy.
NEWS
June 12, 2000 | By John Timpane
'Couples" has been going for a little more than a year and a half now. We've met 75 pairs so far, introduced by 38 different writers. Quite a chronicle. With about 25 couples left, it's time for a midcourse report. I've got a secret: The whole series is one big argument about human nature and what happened to it in the 20th century. That's why it's on the Commentary Page. Something did happen, something decisive, most visible in the way one person collaborates with another. Let's build it, theme by theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Noel Coward wrote Private Lives in 1929 in four days in Shanghai while recovering from a bout of flu. When it opened in London the following year, with Gertrude Lawrence starring as Amanda and Coward himself as Elyot, it was considered daring as well as funny, with one critic scoring what he called its "disgusting exhibition of moral and social decadence. " By now, the shock element is long gone. The social and religious agnosticism at the heart of the comedy, including the conceit of a divorced couple reuniting and "living in sin," seems tame, even unexceptional.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
For many LGBT people of my generation, the dance floor was the place we realized we were far from alone and in fact belonged to a tribe. That sort of awakening is unlike any other, and I bet the young men and women dancing at Pulse in Orlando last weekend knew that feeling too. What they felt as their place of sanctuary and celebration became a killing field I prefer not to imagine. I'd rather look at their faces in the photos. The youthfulness is heartbreaking, but the exuberant, unabashed gay fabulousness makes me smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Noel Coward's delectable 1930 comedy Private Lives , now at the Walnut Street Theatre, is what every romcom aspires to be: laugh-out-loud funny, sexy, rambunctious, and complete with a happy ending preceded by bad behavior. Here are characters whose dialogue is clever and naughty as opposed to their contemporary versions, who often seem dopey and vulgar. The play requires everyone to be veddy, veddy English, knowing all the while that it is all veddy veddy. Here's the setup: Amanda (Kathleen Wallace)
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
There might be more at stake in the race for comptroller of New York City than the future of former Gov. Eliot Spitzer. This could be a final referendum on the sex scandal as we know it, and a reboot on the level of intrusion into the private lives of public servants. Though Spitzer himself didn't necessarily see it that way when I told him so last week. "Look, I'm not sure I'm the right person to ask, because I have a perspective that is so tailored to what I have been through. And I might separate those questions," he told me during an interview on MSNBC's Hardball . "Have we become too intrusive?
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - A leaked document lays bare the monumental scope of the government's surveillance of Americans' phone records - hundreds of millions of calls - in the first hard evidence of a massive data-collection program aimed at combating terrorism under powers granted by Congress after the 9/11 attacks. Civil-liberties advocates and some critics in Congress declared that the sweeping nature of the National Security Agency program, disclosed yesterday, represented an unwarranted intrusion into Americans' private lives.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Jean H. Lee, Associated Press
From Mickey Mouse and a mysterious female companion, to the whiff of economic reform and the surprising ouster of his military mentor, evidence is mounting that North Korea's Kim Jong Un will lead very differently than his secretive father. Seven months after inheriting the country from Kim Jong Il, the 20-something leader suddenly began appearing in public with a beautiful young woman. Dressed in a chic suit with a modern cut, her hair stylishly cropped, she carried herself with the poise of a first lady as she sat by his side for an unforgettable performance: Mickey Mouse grooving with women in little black dresses jamming on electric violins.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the current Broadway revival of Noël Coward's Private Lives wouldn't be ending so quickly if it had the same tone and pizzazz as the Private Lives that opened Wednesday in a production by Lantern Theater Company. Lantern's associate artistic director Kathryn MacMillan stages the play, which first came to Broadway 80 years ago, to target the laughs and not to capture the era, its prime focus in its current seventh Broadway revival. There, it comes off as a look at the style of the British elite of the 1930s that's also a bickerfest meant for fun; at Lantern, it's the other way around.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Edward Wasserman
All along, the Herman Cain campaign - which Politico called "one of the most hapless and bumbling operations in modern presidential politics" - was riveting but improbable. Yet whatever the ex-restaurant executive's other misdeeds and missteps, his bid seems finally to have crumbled because of extensive coverage of a woman's allegations that she had a 13-year extramarital romance with him. Some Cain supporters have cried foul: "Private alleged consensual conduct between adults," said his lawyer, Lin Wood, is "not a proper subject of inquiry by the media or the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011 | BY CARY DARLING, McClatchy Newspapers
"THE BRADY Bunch" was never quite like this. In the likable and enlightening documentary "The Other F Word," aging California punk-rockers wrestle with the pressures of fatherhood while trying to maintain their image as heavily tattooed, foulmouthed nihilists. It makes for an amusing slice of life that deepens as these guys open up about how they yearn to have a better relationship with their kids than the often dysfunctional one they had with their dads. At the center of the film is Jim Lindberg, lead singer for the band Pennywise, who finds himself torn between the pressures of the band (the single guys in the group want to tour all the time)
REAL_ESTATE
July 31, 2011 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Entering the red-and-black contemporary rowhouse in Fishtown where Stacy Sanseverino and Maresa Burleson live is like walking onto a stage set - all action and activity. The housemates, both single, have lived in the 1,900-square-foot house on Tulip Street about a year, and they say it is a good base of operations for their careers, their private lives, and their community outreach. Sanseverino arrived home one recent evening on her scooter and introduced a visitor to Burleson, who had driven in from Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in New Jersey in the fatigues she wears as an officer in the Air Force Reserve.
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