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NEWS
November 11, 2003
FROM THE beginning, even before the concocted stories of her exploits were spread, the saving of Pfc. Jessica Lynch was being used as propaganda. When, cameras running, Lynch was rescued on April 1, there were 11 bodies found with her. Other members of her platoon had been attacked with her; it was pretty likely that at least some of the bodies were American soldiers. Yet it was days before those soldiers were identified - plenty of time to turn Lynch into an action figure and provide an uplifting image to minimize the tragic ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The film opens with Howard Stern - suspended over the stage, his buttocks bare - wondering whether he's doing the right thing as he prepares for his infamous entrance at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards. It ends in a dream sequence, with Stern, in the same get-up, suspended over the stage at the Oscars, about to receive an Academy Award. "God . . . What a dream," Stern, now awake, says to wife Alison. "Good or bad?" "I don't know," says the exasperated jock who, in his dream, has just splattered onto the stage.
NEWS
February 15, 1999
Here's one true thing about sex: We want what we can't have. So, what becomes erotic is what we can't see. In Victorian times, when skirts brushed the floor, a woman's ankles were considered the height of sexiness because they were so little seen. When no proper woman went out without gloves, the bare hand would be rapturously contemplated; the height of come-hither was for a woman to drop her glove. More recently, we have eroticized shoulders, breasts, feet, breasts, earlobes, legs, navels, breasts by covering them, then - ah, release!
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1993 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Because (Howard) Stern learned to get along in a shaming family environment. . . he successfully re-creates this pattern on his show. He causes trouble on the air, where no one can talk back to him and he can control the microphone and telephone, but underneath he still fears the shame and humiliation of his childhood. - A psychotherapist's analysis of Howard Stern in "Private Parts" If a highly trained, mental-health professional wrote that about you, would you lock it away in a safe-deposit box or print it in a book for all your fans and enemies to read?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2011
FROM THE MOMENT Howard Stern signed on at WYSP-FM, he made then-WMMR-FM "Morning Zoo" host John DeBella Public Enemy No. 1. For years, Stern never missed a chance to insult DeBella, both professionally (his unmerciful lampooning of the "Morning Zoo" format) and personally (he frequently described DeBella as "ugly" and referred to him derisively as "Baldy"). All of this culminated with Stern's 1990 "funeral" for DeBella outside the latter's Rittenhouse Square studio once he had toppled DeBella from his long-held perch as the market's most popular morning-show host.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
VERONICA JOYNER was just trying to keep her students warm when she gave members of the school's basketball team hats, gloves and scarves. She never imagined the gesture would lead to one of her star students being arrested and suffering from a serious injury to his genitals. It was a record cold day on Jan. 7. The school, on Broad Street near Callowhill, doesn't have its own gym, so the winning Mighty Elephants were headed to Berean Institute to play Frankford High. Darrin Manning, 16, says his mind was on the game when he got off the subway at the corner of Broad Street and Girard Avenue with a dozen teammates in uniform and suddenly found himself in handcuffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Since we would rather listen to four hours of the Emergency Broadcast Network shriek than one minute of Howard Stern's radio show, it is with some surprise that we report that Stern, the man with a face made for radio, is a movie star. And that Private Parts, based on the self-promoting memoir by this crude-talk jock, is irresistibly funny. And curiously wholesome, if you don't mind a nekkid lady or three and the "Kielbasa Queen," who does things to a foot-long sausage that a sword-swallower doesn't dare with his saber.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | by Stu Bykofsky, Daily News Columnist
"Private Parts" is a tender, periodically funny, shallow-as-a-bed-pan story of a nerdy child his father calls a "moron" who evolves into a successful man his wife calls an "idiot. " Sandwiched between his loved ones are Howard Stern's repeated assessments of himself as "stupid. " It's hard to fault that kind of honesty. The honesty of the rest of the movie is questionable. Based on the best-selling autobiography authored by the self-anointed King of All Media, the movie (disappointingly for Philly fans)
NEWS
February 3, 2004
In light of the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show, it is no wonder the world derides American culture. . . . I was so proud of the beginning ceremonies commemorating the U.S. armed forces and memorializing the Columbia astronauts . . . but then Hollywood entered . . . at halftime. . . . [Performers] sang supposedly popular songs whose lyrics made no audible sense, while dancers and singers . . . gyrated onstage holding their private parts. . . . The finale was when Justin Timberlake tore off a portion of Janet Jackson's jacket, exposing her right breast, complete with a sequined pasty.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When most authors have a book signing, they set up a card table in the back of some bookstore and hope enough people show up so they're not embarrassed. But most authors aren't Howard Stern. Stern, the insanely popular radio and TV personality and author of the New York Times' current No. 1 bestseller Private Parts, held a signing on South Street yesterday, and thousands and thousands of people showed up. It was a line that snaked out of Tower Books at 425 South St., then headed down Passyunk Avenue, turned left onto Bainbridge Street, then went down to and along Fourth Street for blocks.
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NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE THIN 11-year-old, who looked younger than his years, swiveled back and forth in the witness-stand chair and told a Common Pleas jury yesterday that he used to sleep over some weekends in his football coach's home bedroom. Other boys also would sleep on coach Leon Watson's bed, said the boy, who was dressed in a light-blue collared shirt and dark slacks. "We'd be on the bed sometimes and he'd touch us on our private parts, put his mouth on our private parts," the boy said.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
VERONICA JOYNER was just trying to keep her students warm when she gave members of the school's basketball team hats, gloves and scarves. She never imagined the gesture would lead to one of her star students being arrested and suffering from a serious injury to his genitals. It was a record cold day on Jan. 7. The school, on Broad Street near Callowhill, doesn't have its own gym, so the winning Mighty Elephants were headed to Berean Institute to play Frankford High. Darrin Manning, 16, says his mind was on the game when he got off the subway at the corner of Broad Street and Girard Avenue with a dozen teammates in uniform and suddenly found himself in handcuffs.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
WHEN the New York Times , the Guardian and ProPublica last week decided to publish a story on the National Security Agency's activities, despite the objections of security officials who said that the story would harm anti-terrorism efforts, there was very little backlash against the media outlets. That's good - there shouldn't have been. The story, which revealed that the NSA "has circumvented or cracked much of the encryption, or digital scrambling" that is supposed to keep sensitive data on the Internet safe, was an important one for the public to hear.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A chain restaurant in Wharton State Forest. A Ferris wheel at Liberty State Park. Weddings, flea markets, and corporate events taking over New Jersey's historic sites and scenic lands. That could be the future if the state goes forward with plans to privatize parts of its park system, some warn. "Next thing you know, you have to pay more for everything and the public's access is limited," said Jeff Tittel, director of the Sierra Club of New Jersey. "You'll be getting fee'd to death.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2011
FROM THE MOMENT Howard Stern signed on at WYSP-FM, he made then-WMMR-FM "Morning Zoo" host John DeBella Public Enemy No. 1. For years, Stern never missed a chance to insult DeBella, both professionally (his unmerciful lampooning of the "Morning Zoo" format) and personally (he frequently described DeBella as "ugly" and referred to him derisively as "Baldy"). All of this culminated with Stern's 1990 "funeral" for DeBella outside the latter's Rittenhouse Square studio once he had toppled DeBella from his long-held perch as the market's most popular morning-show host.
SPORTS
October 13, 2010
While we've been focused on the Phils, the rest of the country has yammered about Brett Favre's alleged indiscretion. Deadspin broke the original story, which accused Favre of sending lewd pictures and inappropriate voice mail messages to a female reporter who once worked for the Jets. A massage therapist and her husband also have said Favre was guilty of sexual harassment during his time in New York. The NFL says it's investigating the situation.  What do you think about this story and the way it's gone viral so quickly?
NEWS
March 22, 2004 | Leonard Pitts Jr. is a columnist for the Miami Herald
Let me set the scene. You're sitting in traffic with your 4-year-old. Suddenly you notice she's watching with rapt interest something in the next car. You glance over and realize that the other vehicle is equipped with one of those DVD screens that are available on certain late-model cars. The option is usually marketed as a way of keeping kids quiet on long road trips. But what the folks over there are watching is more loin king than The Lion King. Because there onscreen, before your daughter's steadily widening eyes, is a pair of exceedingly fit people using their private parts in ways the child never imagined they could be used.
NEWS
February 3, 2004
In light of the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show, it is no wonder the world derides American culture. . . . I was so proud of the beginning ceremonies commemorating the U.S. armed forces and memorializing the Columbia astronauts . . . but then Hollywood entered . . . at halftime. . . . [Performers] sang supposedly popular songs whose lyrics made no audible sense, while dancers and singers . . . gyrated onstage holding their private parts. . . . The finale was when Justin Timberlake tore off a portion of Janet Jackson's jacket, exposing her right breast, complete with a sequined pasty.
NEWS
November 11, 2003
FROM THE beginning, even before the concocted stories of her exploits were spread, the saving of Pfc. Jessica Lynch was being used as propaganda. When, cameras running, Lynch was rescued on April 1, there were 11 bodies found with her. Other members of her platoon had been attacked with her; it was pretty likely that at least some of the bodies were American soldiers. Yet it was days before those soldiers were identified - plenty of time to turn Lynch into an action figure and provide an uplifting image to minimize the tragic ones.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joe Ragsdale remembers the heat, the still air, the old men gathered on weathered porches more than a half-century ago trading stories about sharecropping, soldiers, masters and slaves. Ragsdale's Uncle Bub - an ancient black man who helped the Union cause in the Civil War - recalled hiding in the woods as armies from North and South swept the Carolina Piedmont. The boy listened, mesmerized, as Uncle Bub described Union troops foraging, killing pigs and chickens, and stealing food not far from that very porch where they sat in Rock Hill, S.C. Fearsome saviors, the boy thought.
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