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Private Property

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NEWS
March 14, 2004 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Deputies to China's weak parliament are expected to enshrine protection of human rights and private property in the nation's constitution today, moves that scholars say may embolden citizens who feel their rights are being trampled. The two proposed amendments, put forth by the ruling Communist Party, are simple yet far-reaching, even if the party's will to enforce them remains in serious question. One amendment says: "The State respects and protects human rights. " The other says: "Citizens' legally obtained private property will not be encroached upon.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge has blocked a religious group from holding loud, racially charged demonstrations in front of the entrance to One Liberty Place at 16th and Chestnut Streets. Judge Ellen Ceisler, in a ruling issued Thursday, barred gatherings by a group that the owners of One Liberty Place said spewed hatred toward whites, women, and gays. They said the demonstrations disrupted the peace, disturbed passersby, and interferred with business at nearby shops. The group, which calls itself the Israelite School of Universal Practical Knowledge, gathered weekly, bullhorns in hand, and chanted offensive rants, according to a suit filed by the owners of One Liberty Place.
NEWS
December 8, 2006 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a decision highlighting the value of open space in the nation's most densely populated state, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled yesterday that Mount Laurel acted properly when it seized a developer's land to preserve open space. "We recognize . . . that the citizens of New Jersey have expressed a strong and sustained public interest in the acquisition and preservation of open space," the state's highest court said in the 6-1 decision. Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club, called the court's action an "important victory" for people and municipalities concerned about the impact of sprawl on the dwindling amount of undeveloped land in the state.
NEWS
November 23, 1994 | By Kristi Nelson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nancy Wasserman said she has found the bodies of three deer on her Berwyn property within the last month. Each had been shot, she said, though she does not know where it happened. "But they died on my property," she said, adding that she tended to one as it died. Wasserman was among the Easttown residents who packed the tiny township meeting room Monday night to oppose the idea of allowing baited hunts on private property. She and others said the concept is cruel and endangers township residents.
NEWS
June 24, 2005 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A narrowly divided Supreme Court said yesterday that the Constitution does not prohibit local governments from seizing private property for other private uses, as long as it is developed for the public benefit. The 5-4 ruling clears the way for New London, Conn., to condemn some private houses for a new office-and-retail complex. It gives other cities and towns more leeway to buy and raze homes, churches, and other properties that yield little tax revenue to make way for shopping malls or office buildings, even if they are not in blighted areas.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR SOME FOLKS, the wind's howl in the night makes them grateful to be safe under cozy covers. Joe and Janet Witkowski are not among these people. In their home - a sweet little rowhouse on Rhett Road in the Northeast - the roar of wind chases them out of their bedroom, in the rear of the house, and into the living room, up front. That's because their property backs up to the forested Walton's Run section of Pennypack Park. The Witkowskis fear that a gigantic limb from one of its ancient sassafras or maple trees will crack through their roof, crushing them in their bed. Branches have plummeted before; Hurricane Sandy blew a heavy limb on top of their backyard fence.
NEWS
September 14, 2010 | By Jennifer R. Clarke and David Hanyok
For most of the last century, people with disabilities were considered "defectives" and forced into state institutions such as the notorious Pennhurst State School and Hospital in Spring City, Chester County, where neglect and abuse ran rampant. That began to change in 1977, when a judge ruling on a lawsuit against Pennhurst led by the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia held that the forced institutionalization of people with disabilities was unconstitutional. That led to the facility's shuttering in 1987.
NEWS
July 16, 2004
WE NEED to clarify a point made in an editorial Wednesday. Drivers of a mini sport bike or motorized scooter don't need a driver's license if they are on private property. However, if they are caught operating one of these vehicles on Pennsylvania's streets or sidewalks - which is illegal - they must have a valid driver's license.
NEWS
December 8, 2010
THE Philadelphia Parking Authority is trying to take over the private towing industry - and when all private towers are out of business, watch out. The Parking Authority is going to get the right to come on your private property and take any vehicle that owes it money. It already has come on private property to give tickets to vehicles that have expired inspection stickers. People, as voters, you have the power: Stop the PPA! Your private property has always been a safe place to store your vehicle.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR SOME FOLKS, the wind's howl in the night makes them grateful to be safe under cozy covers. Joe and Janet Witkowski are not among these people. In their home - a sweet little rowhouse on Rhett Road in the Northeast - the roar of wind chases them out of their bedroom, in the rear of the house, and into the living room, up front. That's because their property backs up to the forested Walton's Run section of Pennypack Park. The Witkowskis fear that a gigantic limb from one of its ancient sassafras or maple trees will crack through their roof, crushing them in their bed. Branches have plummeted before; Hurricane Sandy blew a heavy limb on top of their backyard fence.
NEWS
January 28, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Dupree says city officials are trying to pave paradise and put up a supermarket. Dupree, a renowned Philadelphia artist, is embroiled in a bitter back-and-forth with the city over the fate of his art studio, an 8,600-square-foot building that takes up nearly a block along Haverford Avenue in the Mantua section of West Philadelphia. The property was seized in December 2012 by the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority. The authority condemned a two-block stretch through eminent domain, a legal process that allows government to take private property, pay the owner, and develop the land for public use. When the authority seized the Mantua property, it said the surrounding neighborhood was in desperate need of a supermarket.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
Hold the questions There must have been an intensive training program for local waitstaff that included a mandate to ask diners the question, "Is everything all right?" This questioning is probably proper, but I suggest that I should not always be quizzed only a moment after putting a morsel of food into my mouth. At that point, all I am able to do is nod my head - even though the broccoli may be cold and the mashed potatoes lumpy. Another possible training item is that, after requesting another cup of coffee, I more often than not hear a response of "No problem!"
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not unusual to hear gunshots on the tree-lined street in an otherwise tranquil neighborhood of southern Chester County near the Delaware border. Up and down South Fairville Road in Kennett Township, more than a few residents regularly practice target shooting in their backyards. At a large farm down the road, there's a couple who even fire off cannons on occasion. But some residents began hearing gunshots at night and worried about stray bullets that could hit houses in the area, so Kennett Township supervisors are poised to vote on an ordinance this week that would restrict when and where residents can fire guns on their properties.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY JOHN MORITZ, Daily News Staff Writer moritzj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
TOP NUTTER administration officials told City Council yesterday at the first public hearing on the Center City building collapse that the city isn't responsible for the work done by contractors on private property. Council members on the Special Investigatory Committee raised an array of concerns, including the minimal requirements needed to get a demolition permit; the lack of urgency that followed the citizen's complaint; and the ever-changing mix of contractors, subcontractors and day workers found on job sites, despite permits that name only a developer or "expediter," an industry term for someone who pushes through the work and approvals.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge has blocked a religious group from holding loud, racially charged demonstrations in front of the entrance to One Liberty Place at 16th and Chestnut Streets. Judge Ellen Ceisler, in a ruling issued Thursday, barred gatherings by a group that the owners of One Liberty Place said spewed hatred toward whites, women, and gays. They said the demonstrations disrupted the peace, disturbed passersby, and interferred with business at nearby shops. The group, which calls itself the Israelite School of Universal Practical Knowledge, gathered weekly, bullhorns in hand, and chanted offensive rants, according to a suit filed by the owners of One Liberty Place.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | BY FRANK KUMMER, Philly.com
A RELIGIOUS GROUP spewing what the owners of One Liberty Place called hate speech against women, whites and gays can no longer demonstrate immediately outside the building's entrance, a judge ruled yesterday. The owners of the Center City building filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the Israelite School of Universal Practical Knowledge. The group is frequently perched on street corners shouting at passers-by through bullhorns. Liberty Place Retail Associates, which owns the building, asked the state court to bar the group from gathering in front of the entrance to its 61-story tower at 16th and Chestnut streets.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Environmental officials are entitled to conduct searches of private property where they have grounds to suspect environmental laws have been violated, New Jersey's Supreme Court ruled Thursday. The court said in a unanimous opinion that homeowners and others who acquire permits under the state Freshwater Wetlands Protection Act agree as part of the process to allow such inspections, so long as they are conducted at reasonable times. In its 56-page opinion, the court said the government's right to search for wetlands violations carries restrictions.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Common Pleas Court jury today acquitted 12 Occupy Philadelphia demonstrators arrested in a 2011 sit-in in a Wells Fargo Bank branch in Center City. The jury of 10 women and two men deliberated a total of about 13 hours since Friday before it returned, shortly before noon, to announce the verdicts: not guilty of conspiracy and defiant trespass against each of the 12 protesters. The 12 - one woman and 11 men - were arrested Nov. 18, 2011 when they staged a sit-in inside the Wells Fargo branch at 17th and Market Streets.
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