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NEWS
June 26, 2011
Tim Chapman is chief operating officer of Heritage Action for America (heritageaction.com), a conservative grassroots advocacy group based in Washington Ford Motor Co. is on to something. This year, hundreds of taxis, powered by compressed natural gas, will pop up around the country: 120 Ford Transit Connects in the Los Angeles area, 70 in Connecticut. Las Vegas, St. Louis, and Philadelphia will also see their own fleet of Transit Connects soon. America's abundant supply of cheap, accessible natural gas and the stubbornly high cost of gasoline and diesel are making natural gas vehicles more attractive and economical.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Ken Thomas and Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama made Mitt Romney's day by declaring "the private sector is doing fine" and opening himself to the accusation that he - not the rich Republican - is the one who is out of touch with reality. Obama quickly clarified his remark Friday, but Republicans already had their teeth in it and weren't letting go. "Is he really that out of touch?" Romney, the GOP presidential candidate, asked as Obama's initial comments ricocheted through the campaign. Seeking to head off any damage, Obama backpedaled and declared it is "absolutely clear that the economy is not doing fine.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1998 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
In an impassioned speech, Jesse Jackson yesterday told National Urban League delegates that if blacks are to bridge the wealth gap, they must transcend racial issues and convince business people that it is beneficial to invest in all of the nation's poor as they have in those in foreign countries. "Until we engage the people with the power to change the structures that create the gaps, we will never be able to close the gaps," Jackson told the standing-room-only crowd. "And fundamentally those people are not elected officials, but rather business people in the private sector.
NEWS
December 18, 1992 | by Mark K. Shriver, From the New York Times
The Los Angeles riots, the chaos in Crown Heights and the urban turmoil of the past year have made it abundantly clear that America needs a new approach to its urban problems. Bill Clinton was elected largely because his campaign focused so resolutely on new solutions. But to deliver on his promise of change, Clinton must not play the "either-or" game. We can't spend four more years debating whether social services should be delivered by the public sector or the private sector.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Atlantic City continues to suffer an economic free fall, state officials are contemplating turning to the private sector to jump-start development there. One proposal being reviewed by Gov. Christie and legislative leaders is the creation of a nonprofit development corporation that would help decide what projects to build. That could involve demolishing the shuttered Trump Plaza to create walkable retail and restaurant space and open sight lines, officials said. The nonprofit Atlantic City Development Corp.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By Ralph R. Reiland
THERE'S A POLITICAL ad that's hard to miss: It shows President Obama at a recent news conference saying "the private sector is doing fine. " With unemployment high and the economy stuck on slow, it's a good bet that the Romney campaign and the so-called super PACs will be playing those six words nonstop on TV and radio from now until November. The Obama campaign says the comment is taken out of context. Here's the context. In his opening remarks at the news conference, Obama focused on job growth in the private sector.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Most employers recognize but do not observe Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday. In other words: no day off for employees. A recent Bloomberg BNA survey of employers' holiday practices found just three in 10 organizations would be closed for business. It's a level that has been largely unchanged in similar surveys since 2004. There were clues everywhere Monday that this was far from a normal day in Philadelphia in January. The lack of a morning rush hour. Schools were closed, as were U.S. financial markets.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Dan Meuser and Brian Duke
When it comes to creating a more secure financial future, there's just no substitute for planning ahead. That's exactly what Pennsylvania aims to do through Gov. Corbett's initiative to ensure Pennsylvania Lottery-funded programs for older adults can keep up with the huge wave of baby boomers nearing eligibility age. To be better prepared to serve those citizens, we're exploring establishing a private management agreement for the lottery....
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 10, orange-clad prisoners showed up an hour early (not that they had much choice) for the groundbreaking for eight homes they are scheduled to build for a local nonprofit organization. They were obviously as excited about the gig as they were about the television cameras pointed at them yesterday, and the fact they were temporarily breathing the air outside the grounds of the Garden State Correctional Facility in Bordentown. The prisoners are part of a state Department of Corrections pilot project that officials hope will become a useful tool in the struggle to reduce the number of repeat offenders.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
Mayor Goode is justifiably proud of the new center-city skyline. The twin towers of Liberty Place may not be outstanding architecture, but the new Bell Atlantic tower takes care of the esthetics. Other new buildings, like Mellon Bank and Logan Two, complete the skyline picture and add immeasurably to the new life on the streets. And since it all happened on Mayor Goode's watch, he deserves to bask in some of the glory. Meanwhile, of course, there are some gaping holes in the city.
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NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania State Treasurer Rob McCord will plead guilty to federal charges that he used his office to strong-arm political contributors during his failed gubernatorial bid last year, his lawyers said Friday. McCord, in a video statement, apologized for what he called a mistake, saying he "stepped over the line" in dealing with two potential donors in spring 2014. "I essentially said the potential contributors should not risk making an enemy of the state treasurer," he said.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Jeremy Roebuck and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - State Treasurer Rob McCord said he was stepping down after six years in office, as signs emerged that he might be under scrutiny by federal authorities. Investigators have been asking questions about McCord's campaign-related actions in recent months, according to several sources close to the examination. The extent of their inquiry was unclear. McCord, who submitted his resignation letter to Gov. Wolf Thursday morning, could not immediately be reached for comment.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Atlantic City continues to suffer an economic free fall, state officials are contemplating turning to the private sector to jump-start development there. One proposal being reviewed by Gov. Christie and legislative leaders is the creation of a nonprofit development corporation that would help decide what projects to build. That could involve demolishing the shuttered Trump Plaza to create walkable retail and restaurant space and open sight lines, officials said. The nonprofit Atlantic City Development Corp.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chances are that few, if any, of the many people milling around Reading Terminal Market late Thursday afternoon recognized the dignitary seated at the Bassetts Ice Cream counter. He appeared not to have a care in the world as he worked his way through two scoops of green tea and then two more of pumpkin. "I had ice cream. How can I be stressed?" Fred Hochberg said with a laugh, though stress he surely has. As president of the Export-Import Bank, he leads a self-sustaining federal agency vital to enabling Bassetts and other businesses in the region, and throughout the United States, to export their products.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Chris Palmer and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG The General Assembly is losing one of its respected elder statesman, a conservative Republican who was a straight-talking and impassioned opponent of legalized gambling. Republican State Rep. Paul Clymer, in his 34th year representing upper Bucks County, said last week that he will retire after his term ends later this year. Clymer, 76, had also announced his retirement in 2010 but changed his mind. Now, he said, his tenure in office, combined with 16 years in the private sector and two in the military, made it time to move on. "That's 52 years in the workplace.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
CLOUT, HAVING just suffered through another "off-year" election season, looked hopefully with help to the future yesterday. We canvassed more than 20 politicians and asked them to ponder three political questions: 1. Who will win the 2014 Democratic primary for governor? 2. Who will win the 2015 Democratic primary for mayor? 3. What will Mayor Nutter do when his second term ends? Our top 10 answers were: * District Attorney Seth Williams (who won a second term yesterday)
NEWS
October 9, 2013
Redress old wrongs The recent death of Birdie Africa, the only child to survive the 1985 MOVE bombing, should prompt renewed condemnation of the city officials who bombed the Osage Avenue house and let the ensuing fire burn, causing the deaths of innocent people, including children, and destroying an entire neighborhood ("A life of struggle after living through attack on MOVE," Sept. 26). Even if it is too late to demand justice, the city should at least erect a memorial to convey the message that only eternal vigilance will guarantee that a MOVE-like confrontation never happens again.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Last week, Editorial Page Editor Sandra Shea wrote a separate, signed column ("Hey, teachers: Do the math") about the points that teachers are making in the current school-budget crisis, and questioning some of them. The response was heavy and rapid, from teachers and others, in support of teachers and not, via snail-mail, email and online. Here's a sampling.   I AM a 2011 graduate of Rutgers University and a certified history teacher in New Jersey. I am currently getting my cert in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
IF WHAT Sandra Shea is proposing ("Hey, teachers: Do the math") comes to fruition, I'll never grade a test or homework again, forget about assigning them. When 3:04 comes, I'm out the door. And, on Saturday and Sunday, when my wife and kids want to go on a trip but I'm busy preparing interesting lessons for the upcoming week and finding my own resources . . . forget that, too. Every day will be "Open your textbooks from 1990 to page 330, substitute 'Russia' wherever it says 'Soviet Union' and complete the questions on page 334 in your notebook, which I won't check anyway.
NEWS
August 30, 2013
DURING THIS unquiet summer, President Obama and his advocates have carried on a running argument with Republicans and their allies over the merits of the Affordable Care Act, which he must implement on Oct. 1. By far, the president has gotten the better part of this argument. Having failed to stop enactment, the anti-" ObamaCare" faction, relying on scare tactics and false cries that doom is about to descend, has been waging a nonstop crusade against the law ever since the president signed the bill and made it official.
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