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Prize

NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Graduating from the University of Pennsylvania with a strong desire to change the world and an excellent plan for how to do it? A new Penn program may fund you. Penn president Amy Gutmann has created "engagement prizes" of up to $150,000 - $50,000 for living expenses and $100,000 for project execution - for students with the most promising plans to improve local, national, or global conditions in the year after their graduation. "We want to maximize the encouragement we can give our students who do well by doing good in the world," Gutmann said Tuesday.
SPORTS
May 18, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO – Ending up with Julius Randle might not be bad for the 76ers if they drop below the top three spots in Tuesday's NBA Draft Lottery. The former Kentucky power forward is one of the headliners of the June 26 draft. The 6-foot-9, 250-pounder is being compared to Memphis Grizzlies power forward Zach Randolph. Randle finishes well around the rim and has a solid face-up game. Randle is also effective in pick-and-rolls and on pick-and-pops. The Texas native averaged 15 points and 10.4 rebounds and was an Associated Press all-American third-teamer as a freshman last season.
SPORTS
May 7, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
AS HAPPY As Sixers coach Brett Brown was yesterday when point guard Michael Carter-Williams was named NBA rookie of the year, he said he could not yet exhale. It's too early in the process for one moment of success to cloud the picture of how much more work there is to do in this remake of the Sixers' franchise from the bottom to the top. Brown knew exactly what he was getting into when he accepted the task of coaching the Sixers last August, but even though he has been transparent with himself and the fan base about the nature of the challenge, he needed a reason to breathe a tiny sigh of relief.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEWARK, N.J. - On one level, the race to succeed U.S. Sen. Cory Booker as mayor of New Jersey's largest city is a local political contest with the candidates debating issues familiar to urban America: intractable violent crime, a struggling school district challenged by charter schools, a perpetual battle to attract development and create jobs. Behind the scenes, though, the May 13 nonpartisan election is shaping up as a battleground for a bigger prize: control of Essex County and, in turn, an edge in a possible Democratic primary for the next gubernatorial election.
SPORTS
April 17, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
NOW THE proud owner of a sparkling national championship ring with little left to accomplish at the collegiate level, the lure of the NHL was just too big for Shayne Gostisbehere to ignore. Gostisbehere, the Flyers' 2012 third-round pick, agreed to terms yesterday on a 3-year, entry-level deal just 3 days removed from helping Union College win its first NCAA crown, on Wells Fargo Center ice. He was named the Frozen Four's most outstanding player after finishing with one goal, four assists over the two games.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
INGA SAFFRON had a plan, and it didn't involve winning the highest honor in American journalism. But the Inquirer's architecture writer took one for the team about 3 p.m. yesterday when she bagged the 20th Pulitzer Prize in the newspaper's history. "I was slipping out quietly to cook, when people started coming over to my desk," Saffron said of the foiled plan to slink away unnoticed to prepare a Passover seder for 10 people. Those dang Pulitzers. Get handed out at the most inconvenient times.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
VILLANOVA Judge Marc Carter is an Army veteran, and his father and brothers also served in the military. So it was no surprise that he was moved to act when a Marine veteran appeared in his Texas court in 2009. The Marine had recently served in Fallujah, Iraq, and came home to a "parade in his neighborhood," Carter said. But he ran into trouble after that, and appeared before Carter on a nonviolent felony charge. "That situation really, really took me," Carter said. "I was really emotional about that Marine's story.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fourth year in a row, a Cherry Hill girl is a winner in C-Span's national StudentCam competition. Madeline Bowne, a sophomore at Cherry Hill High School East, will be awarded $1,500 for her second-prize documentary, "Driving Under the Influence (of Cell Phones)," about cellphone use while driving. Bowne's piece will be shown on C-Span on April 14 at 6:50 a.m. and throughout the day. Bowne, the daughter of teachers, has become a regular in the highly competitive contest. As a seventh grader, she took a third prize.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A local scientist and two area doctors, whose pioneering work has helped thousands and could lead to helping millions, will receive a prestigious Philadelphia science prize Friday. The John Scott Award was created in 1822 as a legacy to Benjamin Franklin, intended to honor "ingenious men and women who make useful inventions" to benefit society. Recipients have included 15 Nobel Prize winners as well as the Wright brothers, Jonas Salk, and Thomas A. Edison. This year's recipients are P. Leslie Dutton, a biochemist and biophysicist at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, and two physicians who will share an award, N. Scott Adzick, surgeon-in-chief at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Robert L. Brent, former chairman of pediatrics at Thomas Jefferson University.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
HEATHER McMonnies-Fetter is a mother to a boy named Leif, a girl named Cymbeline and an army of pungent, sensitive children who demand her constant love and attention. "I've got two little human babies," she said, "and 2,000 mushroom babies to take care of eight days a week. " Three years ago, Heather, an art historian, and her husband, Norm, a woodworker, musician and painter, sold their house in Fishtown and hunkered down on a 5.5-acre wooded plot in Spring City, about an hour northwest of the city.
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