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Proceedings

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NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The judge overseeing the case of two teenage brothers charged with murder in the strangulation of 12-year-old Autumn Pasquale on Friday rejected a bid by the news media to gain access to the pair's Juvenile Court proceedings. Superior Court Judge Colleen A. Maier announced her decision from the bench at a closed hearing attended by two lawyers representing news organizations. Officials have not released the suspects' names, but residents of Clayton, where the brothers and their alleged victim lived, have identified them as Justin Robinson, 15, and his 17-year-old brother, Dante.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1988 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some people go to criminal court because they want to. To watch. A quiet courtroom at the Police Administration Building is open 24 hours a day - everyday - for preliminary arraignments, and spectators can sit on the well-worn benches and watch the proceedings. It's not always uplifting, but it can be very interesting. It provides a chance to view a human panorama and get a firsthand look at the justice system in action. It's 6:40 p.m. on a Thursday. The woman has been sitting on a bench for five hours.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
Is it time for more courts to televise their proceedings, or will that lead to lawyers playing to the cameras?
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By FRANK JACKMAN, New York Daily News
The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that the Constitution's Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination does not apply to civil proceedings concerning treatment, not punishment, for sex offenders. In a 5-4 decision , the court decided that an Illinois man faced with psychiatric commitment as a "sexually dangerous person" was not entitled to certain protections afforded to criminal defendants. The court rejected the appeal of Terry B. Allen, who was committed in civil - rather than criminal - proceedings to the maximum-security psychiatric ward at the Menard, Ill., State Prison, mostly on the basis of testimony from two court-appointed psychiatrists.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Main Line lawyer will stay in jail until he pays $3 million cash bail or turns over $2.5 million in assets as part of divorce proceedings, despite courtroom attempts by his attorney to have him freed yesterday. H. Beatty Chadwick, 58, spent his 16th day in Delaware County Prison, jailed on a contempt charge after being arrested at a Center City dentist's office April 5 after authorities were tipped that he had an appointment there. In court yesterday, Chadwick's attorney, Matthew Taylor, told Judge Joseph T. Labrum Jr. that the judge had overstepped his authority in issuing a bench warrant for Chadwick's arrest, and in ordering him to turn over his money and passport so that he could not leave the country.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By REGINALD STUART, Daily News Staff Writer
The unfolding judicial proceedings against former top aides to President Reagan in connection with the Iran-Contra scandal, along with Reagan's controversial decision last night to send troops to Honduras, may be doing more to change the chemistry of the 1988 race for president than any developments to date. The emerging plea bargains and indictments in the Iran-Contra scandal are giving Democrats fresh ammunition for their 1988 assault on the White House. And deeper involvement in the civil war involving the Nicaraguan Contras adds fuel to the Democrats' charges of mismanaged foreign policy.
NEWS
June 29, 2002 | By Jacqueline Soteropoulos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for The Inquirer and the Daily News filed an emergency appeal yesterday, asking Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices to open the secret trial proceedings of the troubled Lex Street massacre case. The newspapers want the state's highest court to order Common Pleas Court Judge Gregory E. Smith to conduct Monday's scheduled hearing in open court. If the Supreme Court declines to immediately open the proceedings, the attorneys for the newspapers have asked the justices to halt further closed hearings in the death-penalty case until the court can more fully weigh the issues at stake.
NEWS
February 11, 1987
About this Municipal Court Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen. I think he should be punished more than just being censured. He should be thrown off the bench for his disgraceful conduct. But according to the judge running the proceedings, that's all that can be done to Judge Kafrissen. Well, like they say, they protect their own. Birds of a feather flock together, so they say. I could write more but it wouldn't do any good. Edward J. Zebuski Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday refused to consider whether the Pennsylvania Supreme Court improperly barred former Common Pleas Court Judge Bernard Snyder from regaining office. The court, without comment, refused to consider Snyder's contention that the state high court acted improperly when it voted in March that he was unfit to serve on the bench, based on its finding that he had violated the Code of Judicial Conduct. When the state Supreme Court acted, Snyder had been off the court for more than a year, having been voted out of office in a 1985 retention election.
SPORTS
May 8, 2009
For rowing aficionados planning to partake in the 75th annual Dad Vail Regatta, president Jim Hanna wants you to know that the race is still on - with just a few minor alterations. Yesterday, practices were canceled due to a mixture of inclement weather and river conditions, leaving questions about today's proceedings. Officials decided to push the start time from 7 to 8 a.m. to accommodate the hundreds of teams and onlookers expected along Kelly Drive today. In addition, teams will race in a head-to-head format as opposed to the traditional side-by-side style that, according to Hanna, allows for a "safer way to row given the current conditions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a Voorhees man, seriously injured in 2010 while trying to surf on a wave machine at a water park, can proceed with a gross-negligence lawsuit. Roy Steinberg, 52, filed a civil lawsuit against Sahara Sam's Oasis in Berlin, Camden County, saying workers failed to instruct him properly about how to surf safely on the FlowRider, and that the park did not adequately warn him about the risk of serious injury on the machine, which simulates ocean waves.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
Last week, Russian bombers flew out of Iranian air bases to attack rebel positions in Syria. The State Department pretended not to be surprised. It should be. It should be alarmed. Iran's intensely nationalistic revolutionary regime had never permitted foreign forces to operate from its soil. Until now. The reordering of the Middle East is proceeding apace. Where for 40 years the U.S.-Egypt alliance anchored the region, a Russia-Iran condominium is now dictating events. That's what you get after eight years of U.S. retrenchment and withdrawal.
SPORTS
July 29, 2016 | By Les Bowen, Staff Writer
AS REPORTERS waited in an interview tent for Doug Pederson to speak to them Wednesday, the Eagles' first-year coach leaned into a practice-field huddle. No one in the huddle wore a uniform. The strategies being discussed weren't in Pederson's playbook. Pederson conferred with Eagles football operations vice president Howie Roseman, team security chief Dom DiSandro, player personnel vice president Joe Douglas and public relations director Derek Boyko. The subject was linebacker Nigel Bradham's arrest this week for aggravated battery in Miami, but there was a subtext.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
A judge Thursday shot down Bill Cosby's latest attempt to have his sexual-assault case dismissed, ruling the case could move forward without pretrial testimony from accuser Andrea Constand. In explaining his ruling from the bench, Montgomery County Court Judge Steven T. O'Neill described "as perfectly proper" the decision by prosecutors not to call Constand as a witness at the May hearing in which the 78-year-old entertainer was ordered to stand trial. Instead, they relied on the statement Constand gave to police when she first reported her alleged assault 11 years ago. "The commonwealth does not have to present live evidence at preliminary hearings," the judge said.
REAL_ESTATE
June 6, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. With all eyes focused on the rising real estate fortunes of Philadelphia, what's going on 25 miles away is sometimes ignored, except by the people who live in what many these days call "the reemerging boroughs. " One of these is Souderton, a Montgomery County community off Route 309 that during a couple of recent visits was a hub of activity, now that work has resumed around the train station at Broad and Main Streets.
NEWS
April 27, 2016
Civil rights claims against two Philadelphia police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Brandon Tate-Brown in 2014 were cleared to proceed Monday, despite a federal judge tossing several counts alleged in a lawsuit filed by his family. In a 20-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell denied a request from Tate-Brown's mother to turn her case into a class-action lawsuit - a move that would have opened the door for others who say they were subjected to excessive police force join in the civil action.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
A federal judge this week ruled that five women who claim they were harmed by Essure sterilization coils can go ahead with their lawsuit against coil-maker Bayer Healthcare. Bayer, which is facing a barrage of lawsuits across the country, had asked that the case be dismissed because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2002 gave premarketing approval to Essure, a status that shields devices from product liability litigation in state courts. While U.S. District Judge John R. Padova in Philadelphia rejected most of the women's claims against Bayer, he concluded that two were reasonable and should not be dismissed: that the company used misleading advertising and that it failed to warn about Essure's risks.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Mark Fazlollah and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
The judicial tribunal weighing the fate of former Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin abruptly froze his case Tuesday, a move that experts said suggested the case could end without a trial. Last week, the government lawyers who in December brought the misconduct case against Eakin over his exchange of offensive emails asked the Court of Judicial Discipline for permission to drop the most serious charge against him: bringing the Supreme Court "into disrepute. " The lawyers did so two days after Eakin, 67, a Republican who was first elected to the high court in 2001, resigned, becoming the second justice to quit the court because of the Porngate scandal.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
A federal judge has allowed Philadelphia taxi companies' unfair-competition lawsuit against Uber to move forward. U.S. District Judge Nitza I. QuiƱones Alejandro denied Uber's motion to dismiss the cab companies' false-representation claim filed by Checker Cab Philadelphia. The judge dismissed the plaintiffs' false-advertising claim and contention that Uber violated the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. She also dismissed a claim that Google, as an investor in Uber, conspired with the ride-sharing company.
NEWS
March 1, 2016 | By Terry Jarrett
The U.S. Supreme Court recently took the unprecedented step of issuing a stay of President Obama's massive Clean Power Plan. The court ruled that states should not be compelled to assume the exorbitant costs imposed by the plan until a federal court determines its legality. The ruling produced a huge sigh of relief from the 27 states currently suing to halt a large-scale transformation of their energy grid through one of the most far-reaching regulations ever imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency.
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