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Proclamation

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NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The U.S. Supreme Court may say that flag burning is protected by the Constitution, but the Hatboro Borough Council has different ideas. The council unanimously endorsed a proclamation by Mayor Joseph Solano urging that last month's ruling by the high court be circumvented. The court ruled that a protester was exercising his First Amendment right to free speech when he burned a flag outside the 1984 Republican Convention in Dallas. "This is something that is very, very serious, and that's the flag," Solano said before reading the proclamation to the council during Monday's meeting at Borough Hall.
NEWS
April 19, 2010
History will be kind to me for I intend to write it. That Winston Churchill quote comes to mind in considering the recent controversy over Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell's declaration of April as Confederate History Month. As the 150th anniversary of the Civil War approaches, descendants of Johnny Reb are still trying to gain command of America's recollection of their ancestors' treasonous acts. They found a willing accomplice in McDonnell, whose first proclamation failed to even mention slavery, the very institution the Southern states went to war to preserve.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
Aides to Texas Gov. George W. Bush, the GOP presidential nominee, removed a controversial proclamation, declaring a recent statewide "Jesus Day" from the governor's official Web site last week. The removal was discovered by the Daily News right in the middle of Bush's Philadelphia nominating convention, which focused heavily on acceptance of racial and ethnic diversity. Linda Edwards, Bush's governmental spokeswoman in Austin, Texas, said the proclamation that June 10 would be "Jesus Day" - honoring a nationwide event created by an Austin-based religious group - had been removed from the governor's Web site for no other reason than space concerns.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
To her friends at Cliveden Convalescent Center, Louise Kennedy is "a quiet, serene little baby," but she's also one of Philadelphia's remarkable little treasures. So yesterday, for the second consecutive year, Mayor Rendell honored Kennedy for accomplishing something that few people can ever hope to achieve - living well beyond a century. A fifth-generation Philadelphian, Kennedy celebrated her 108th birthday with a limousine ride from the Germantown nursing home to City Hall, where she was honored with a proclamation and what Rendell called "our best wishes and the best wishes of 1.6 million people.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PAUL HU
A proclamation of protest, accusing Mayor Rendell of "disdain and lack of leadership for the communities affected by AIDS," was delivered to the mayor's office yesterday. Assembled outside City Hall with the proclamation were (from left) Julie Davids, Judith Tannenbaum and Lisa Weinberger.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
The Bucks County commissioners last week issued a proclamation honoring Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat credited with saving an estimated 90,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II. At the presenting of the proclamation were (from left) Andrew Warren, chairman of the commissioners; Melanie Kaneff of Churchville; Kathy Goodkin of Lawrenceville, whose mother was saved by Wallenberg, and Ilene Munetz-Pachman of Richboro, who headed the drive to honor the diplomat. Wallenberg is believed to have died while under arrest in the Soviet Union.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Washington must have loved Thanksgiving, because he proclaimed at least three of them. President John Adams declared two, Thomas Jefferson avoided the holiday entirely, and James Madison so adored Thanksgiving that one year he pronounced it twice. On Tuesday, an essential, early, and expensive document - a Thanksgiving proclamation signed by Washington on Oct. 3, 1789 - visits the National Constitution Center before going up for auction, where it is expected to bring at least $8 million.
NEWS
March 26, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware, which calls itself The First State, on Monday became the last state to have sites designated as federal parkland, to be known as the First State National Monument. In a noontime Oval Office ceremony, President Obama signed a proclamation to form the National Monument out of three sites, two in Delaware and a third along the Brandywine Creek, reaching into Pennsylvania. The sites are Dover Green, the New Castle Courthouse complex and the Woodlawn property in the Brandywine Valley.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Joann Loviglio, Associated Press
A document signed by President Abraham Lincoln ordering Union blockades of Confederate ports, marking the official start of the Civil War, is for sale. The Raab Collection in Philadelphia said Tuesday it was selling the document, which it calls one of the most important in American history. The asking price is $900,000. Lincoln's proclamation is dated April 19, 1861 - a week after the first shots of the conflict were fired at South Carolina's Fort Sumter. After the Civil War ended in 1865, the U.S. Supreme Court in an opinion called Lincoln's April 19 blockade order the official beginning of the war. Lincoln's order "was bold and with great risk," said Nathan Raab, vice president of the Raab Collection.
SPORTS
November 2, 2012 | By Rich Hofmann, Daily News Staff Writer
NEWS THAT the Eagles held a players-only meeting in the aftermath of their three-game losing streak comes as no surprise. It is a familiar dynamic, right out of The Standard NFL Locker Room Manual. If form holds, what will follow is the ritual circling of the wagons, followed by the blaming of the media, followed by - in the event they beat the New Orleans Saints on Monday night - the proclamation that "nobody believed in us except for the 53 people in this room. " And, et cetera. Far more interesting was quarterback Michael Vick's proclamation that he was going to throw off whatever mental constraints have been holding him back and just be himself again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The National Park Service, in partnership with the National Park Foundation's African American Experience Fund, has launched Expressions of Freedom, a nationwide artistic competition to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, signed in 1863. The contest, open to students 13 to 18 years old, will be juried by professional artists in three categories — photography, poetry, and digital short films. The first-place winner in each category will receive a $2,500 academic scholarship; the second-place winner will receive a $1,000 academic scholarship.
NEWS
June 14, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
On this date in 1777, the Second Continental Congress, sitting in Philadelphia, adopted the Stars and Stripes as the flag of the new United States of America. The date went unobserved until the 19th Century, and even then it was spotty. In Philadelphia, at the urging of the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution, then-Schools Superintendent Edward Brooks organized an observance at Independence Square in 1893. "School children were assembled, each carrying a small Flag, and patriotic songs were sung and addresses delivered," according to usflag.org In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation declaring June 14 National Flag Day and Congress made it official in 1949 with an act that President Harry Truman signed into law.
NEWS
November 28, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
With so much already on his mind, the repetitious signing of 48 identical printed documents must have seemed tedious. But the souvenir copies of the Emancipation Proclamation awaiting Abraham Lincoln's signature at the White House were going for a good cause. The president dutifully scribbled his name across the bottom of each one in 1864, then traveled to Philadelphia's Great Central Fair, where the iconic documents were sold for the benefit of wounded Union soldiers during the Civil War. They went for $10 apiece.
NEWS
April 19, 2010
History will be kind to me for I intend to write it. That Winston Churchill quote comes to mind in considering the recent controversy over Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell's declaration of April as Confederate History Month. As the 150th anniversary of the Civil War approaches, descendants of Johnny Reb are still trying to gain command of America's recollection of their ancestors' treasonous acts. They found a willing accomplice in McDonnell, whose first proclamation failed to even mention slavery, the very institution the Southern states went to war to preserve.
NEWS
June 22, 2007
Recently, Philadelphia City Council voted to rescind a proclamation that Philadelphia is a pro-choice city, which was initially proposed by Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown ("Council repeals 'pro-choice city' resolution," June 15). If the proclamation had passed and was signed, the title would merely be a declaration about Philadelphia's position, and would not affect any public-policy decisions. The issue is not whether Philadelphia supports pro-choice, pro-life or any other stance on abortion.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the sounds of a brass band and escorted by a squad of black soldiers in 19th-century uniforms, an icon of American history rolled through Center City in a horse-drawn carriage yesterday. A rare copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, bearing authentic signatures of Abraham Lincoln and William Seward, his secretary of state, arrived at the African American Museum in Philadelphia at Seventh and Arch Streets, in honor of the museum's 30th anniversary and the African American celebration of Juneteenth.
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