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Professional Development

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NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Shobo, Shady, Polka, Dot, and the rest of Kapo's Gang begin their monthly meeting at a Cherry Hill church with a prayer. Then the fun starts. "Ho-ho, ha-ha-ha," the 20 or so professional clowns chant in a circle, practicing Laughter Yoga with a visiting instructor (and civilian), Melanie Galioto. The mostly middle-aged men and women are not in costume or in character, but soon enough everybody is laughing spontaneously, including me. Especially me. "You're like a big cartoon character," observes Mark St. Marie, 50, a Philadelphia firefighter who lives in the city's Bridesburg section and performs as Buster T. Clown.
NEWS
November 6, 2004 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Education yesterday released regulations for veteran teachers who need to be designated "highly qualified" under federal law but either can't pass or won't take subject-matter tests. The regulations for the "bridge certificate" will require most teachers to take professional-development or college courses in the subject they teach. However, the rules are unclear as to how teachers will be assessed. The No Child Left Behind law requires all students to have a "highly qualified" teacher by the 2005-06 school year and specifies that all teachers of seventh grade and above demonstrate content knowledge.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
DURING ASHNA Blackston's sophomore year at Martin Luther King High in East Germantown, she got out of school later than her peers at other schools. For many teenagers, it would've been a nuisance, but the extra time allowed Blackston to get tutoring, dig into her studies and develop a closer relationship with her teachers. "You could learn more in the classes. We had more time for the teachers to work with us one-on-one," recalled Blackston, now a senior. "It was helpful. " King was part of the second set of Promise Academies - the district's turnaround model ushered in under the late Arlene Ackerman's Renaissance Schools Initiative to turn around failing schools.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Christopher B. Daly, Washington Post Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A man who burned himself to death on the Amherst town common in an apparent protest against the Persian Gulf war was identified yesterday as Gregory D. Levey, 30, a substitute teacher. Authorities said Levey acted alone when he doused himself with two gallons of paint thinner and set himself ablaze Monday afternoon in a protest that horrified onlookers in the center of Amherst, a university town of about 35,000 residents about 75 miles west of Boston. Levey was the son of Robert Levey, Boston Globe restaurant critic, and the stepson of Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Globe.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Middleton family, which made its fortune in tobacco and owns part of the Phillies, will give $16 million over four years to the School District of Philadelphia and to other educational institutions for training in workforce and professional development. When Mayor Nutter and John Middleton announced the donation Tuesday at a City Hall news conference, most of the 200 people attending stood up and cheered. "This is a game-changer for Philadelphia and one more sign of the commitment people are willing to make to the city's greatest asset, our children," Nutter said.
NEWS
September 25, 1988 | By Karen K. Gress, Special to The Inquirer
The Coatesville Area school board has approved a plan requiring new teachers to further their education. The school board approved the Continuing Professional Development Plan at Thursday's meeting to comply with the state Department of Education's ruling that each school district must assist "new-era teachers" - those who received their initial Pennsylvania certification after July 1, 1987 - further their education through in-service credits, workshops,...
NEWS
June 28, 2004 | By William Kashatus
The Pennsylvania Board of Education is making a serious mistake in its effort to eliminate content tests as a requirement for teaching middle school students ("Pa. moves to waive some teacher tests," June 19). If implemented, the regulations would affect veteran seventh- and eighth-grade teachers with elementary, or general, certifications who teach math, science, English and social studies. Not only will the action result in a decline in teaching standards across the commonwealth, but they will dilute the knowledge base of the current generation of students.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | by Yvette Ousley and Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writers
A nasty fight over Schools Superintendent David Hornbeck's pick for third-in-command ended last night after the school board by one vote appointed the Detroit educator Hornbeck wanted. Residents, mostly from the Northeast, voiced strong opposition to the new hire, telling Hornbeck that the district couldn't afford Kay A. Lovelace at a salary of $100,637. Seemingly unmoved, Hornbeck said he looked forward to Lovelace's joining his staff. "I think everyone who comes into contact with Kay after she gets here will recognize the really strong talent that she brings to the job, and all those who care about kids will end up being enthusiastic about her leadership," Hornbeck said.
NEWS
April 10, 2001 | by Mark Angeles Daily News Staff Writer
Some of the better writing to come out of Stoddart-Fleisher Middle School is being done by teachers - and for money. Several teachers at Stoddart-Fleisher in North Philadelphia are putting pen to paper as members of a committee that specializes in writing grant applications. Philadelphia public schools commonly seek grants for funding and training and seek partnerships for professional development and student programming. Why? Simple math. The vast majority of a school's budget, according to Stoddart-Fleisher's principal, Bernard McGee, goes toward teacher and staff salaries, leaving less than 10 percent for books, supplies, professional development, school trips and extracurricular activities.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District is borrowing a top executive from SmithKline Beckman Corp. to design a staff-development program for middle- level management. The Board of Education voted unanimously Tuesday to accept the services for one-year of Laurence H. Kahn, director of human services development at SmithKline. The executive-on-loan arrangement will cost the school district nothing; SmithKline will pay Kahn's salary while he is working for the district. The plan calls for Kahn to design, prepare, implement and evaluate the professional development program.
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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
DURING ASHNA Blackston's sophomore year at Martin Luther King High in East Germantown, she got out of school later than her peers at other schools. For many teenagers, it would've been a nuisance, but the extra time allowed Blackston to get tutoring, dig into her studies and develop a closer relationship with her teachers. "You could learn more in the classes. We had more time for the teachers to work with us one-on-one," recalled Blackston, now a senior. "It was helpful. " King was part of the second set of Promise Academies - the district's turnaround model ushered in under the late Arlene Ackerman's Renaissance Schools Initiative to turn around failing schools.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By Jan Ransom and Daily News Staff Writer
THE MAYOR'S Reception Room at City Hall filled with cheers Tuesday when Mayor Nutter announced that Phillies co-owner John Middleton and his wife, Leigh, will donate more than $16.2 million over the next four years toward educational, workforce-training and professional-development programming.   The Middleton family picked eight educational efforts to support, providing money to the cash-strapped school district, Philadelphia Academies Inc., Philadelphia Youth Network and Drexel University through the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Middleton family, which made its fortune in tobacco and owns part of the Phillies, will give $16 million over four years to the School District of Philadelphia and to other educational institutions for training in workforce and professional development. When Mayor Nutter and John Middleton announced the donation Tuesday at a City Hall news conference, most of the 200 people attending stood up and cheered. "This is a game-changer for Philadelphia and one more sign of the commitment people are willing to make to the city's greatest asset, our children," Nutter said.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
William R. Hite Jr. is the new Philadelphia schools chief. Hite, a former teacher and principal, has been superintendent in Prince George's County, Md., since 2009. Announcing the selection Friday night, School Reform Commission Chairman Pedro Ramos called Hite "an eminent educator and a proven transformative leader. " Hite's salary and start date have yet to be finalized. He makes $250,000 annually in Prince George's County, but his contract there requires that he give 120 days' notice in order to receive severance.
NEWS
June 30, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William R. Hite Jr. is the new Philadelphia schools chief. Hite, a former teacher and principal, has been superintendent in Prince George's County, Md., since 2009. Announcing the selection Friday night, School Reform Commission Chairman Pedro Ramos called Hite "an eminent educator and a proven transformative leader. " Hite's salary and start date have yet to be finalized. He makes $250,000 annually in Prince George's County, but his contract there requires that he give 120 days' notice in order to receive severance.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Shobo, Shady, Polka, Dot, and the rest of Kapo's Gang begin their monthly meeting at a Cherry Hill church with a prayer. Then the fun starts. "Ho-ho, ha-ha-ha," the 20 or so professional clowns chant in a circle, practicing Laughter Yoga with a visiting instructor (and civilian), Melanie Galioto. The mostly middle-aged men and women are not in costume or in character, but soon enough everybody is laughing spontaneously, including me. Especially me. "You're like a big cartoon character," observes Mark St. Marie, 50, a Philadelphia firefighter who lives in the city's Bridesburg section and performs as Buster T. Clown.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Almost all of Camden's public schools could be made to undergo new state-required intervention efforts under proposals in New Jersey's application for a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act. According to the state's recently submitted exemption application, 23 of the district's 26 schools ranked among the state's lowest performers, making them "priority schools," a new designation. Of the 74 priority schools tentatively identified, Camden had the highest concentration, according to a state Education Department spokesman.
NEWS
August 19, 2011 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Making a defiant and emotional stand Thursday, embattled Philadelphia School Superintendent Arlene C. Ackerman dared her bosses to make a decision on her future - now. "Sentence me. I dare you. Or set me free. But I admit to you today that I am guilty. Guilty of just being me," she told hundreds of School District principals who gathered for the close of a three-day professional-development meeting. Ackerman pointedly entered the Lincoln High School auditorium to the Sade song "Is It a Crime" and made the title the theme of her speech.
NEWS
October 28, 2008 | By Christopher Paslay
When I was growing up, my father would top off the oil and antifreeze in the family car whenever it had any trouble. It didn't matter if the battery was dead or the transmission was lying on the garage floor - my dad always went through the ritual of refilling the car's fluids. Philadelphia School District officials seem to follow a similar logic. No matter what issues face our city's public schools, the bosses seem to believe that lengthening the school day and providing more professional development for teachers is the cure-all.
NEWS
November 6, 2004 | By Dale Mezzacappa INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Department of Education yesterday released regulations for veteran teachers who need to be designated "highly qualified" under federal law but either can't pass or won't take subject-matter tests. The regulations for the "bridge certificate" will require most teachers to take professional-development or college courses in the subject they teach. However, the rules are unclear as to how teachers will be assessed. The No Child Left Behind law requires all students to have a "highly qualified" teacher by the 2005-06 school year and specifies that all teachers of seventh grade and above demonstrate content knowledge.
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