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NEWS
November 28, 1986 | BY LARRY D. MISTICHELLI
In America the last two decades have brought with them a steady decline in our moral fiber and standard of values. The symptoms are everywhere. Our nation's youth is a generation in deep trouble. They seem, for the most part, incapable of sophisticated thinking. Millions border on illiteracy. They are succumbing to drugs at a frightening rate. They are a low motivation group that has developed a pattern of accepting minimal output from themselves. These symptoms, however, do not belong only to the young.
SPORTS
July 18, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It's not supposed to be this easy. It's supposed to take time, a lot of hard work and endless patience. Failure should precede success, and only those who can overcome it get to achieve greatness. At the moment, the expected timeline for a professional athlete's progression is being eaten alive by the ultra-talented young in a variety of sports. Start with baseball. Fox's theme for Tuesday night's All-Star Game telecast was baseball's youth movement and it was born of validity.
SPORTS
December 5, 1989 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
Johann Clytus considers himself a pretty serious basketball fan. A junior investments and securities major at Temple University, he goes to the Spectrum seven or eight times a year to watch the Sixers play. He also makes it to a few Knicks games when he goes home to Brooklyn. Clytus enjoys going to NBA games. But lately, he has been noticing something: the skin color of the people who go to the games. Clytus is black. Most of the people around him are white. "It's weird," Clytus said.
SPORTS
April 14, 2016 | By David Murphy, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
On an April night in 1973, a kid from Roxborough stood in front of the Spectrum and listened to a muffled roar explode through its walls. He did not go in. Could not go in, really. Hell, they couldn't even watch it on TV. They were Roxborough kids, the sons of machinists, of factory foremen, of Marine Corps vets who returned from Korea and spent the rest of their lives cobbling together a living on the ground floor of the industrial complex that enabled such entanglements. Funny how it works: You risk your life to protect the capital, you manufacture the material to construct the building, and then you stand outside and listen to the crowd.
NEWS
November 27, 1998 | by JEFFREY P. GRAHAM
Sam Donnellon (Going Deep, Nov. 11) suggests that the principal reason fans have stopped attending professional sports events and are not watching on television is because professional sports just needs some tweaking in their marketing. A look at these sports shows how he is really missing the mark. Baseball: The sport was lucky enough to get juiced by a wonderful tale of sportsmanship, true grit and the pursuit of excellence. But the Sosa-McGwire show was sabotaged by some of the most uneven and uninspired umpiring ever seen in baseball.
NEWS
July 25, 2003
AS BASKETBALL superstar Kobe Bryant becomes the latest figure from the world of professional sports to fall, now formally charged with rape, individuals across the nation are expressing shock and disbelief that such a "fine young man" could be accused of such a hideous act. Why is anyone surprised? Without making a judgment on Mr. Bryant's culpability, he joins the long list of sports figures who have brought disgrace on themselves and their game. When will we learn that the cream of society's crop is not found in professional sports?
NEWS
February 17, 2010
THE LOSS of a Georgian luge Olympian and two disastrous potholes at the NASCAR Daytona 500 raise the question as to whether professional sports has adopted the current business philosophy of cutting corners without regard to athletes and spectators alike. Professional sports can't be run like government, with its lobbying, kickbacks and tunnel vision politics. Those in charge are treating these gifted competitors like common citizens dealing with blatant budget cutbacks. Professional sports and the government must take care of the athletes and the citizens, not special interests.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The NCAA and the four major professional sports leagues are suing to prevent New Jersey from legalizing sports betting. The suit was filed Tuesday morning in U.S. District Court in Trenton, with Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League and the National Football League joining the National Collegiate Athletic Association as plaintiffs. The complaint argues the state has pursued a course of action that could, "within the next two months," allows casinos and racetracks to "commence gambling operations on amateur and professional sports.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The NCAA and four major professional sports leagues filed suit Tuesday to stop New Jersey from implementing sports betting at the dozen casinos here and the state's race tracks. The legal action by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the professional leagues was expected. It follows a referendum in favor of allowing sports betting in New Jersey, laws passed by the state Legislature, regulations drafted by Gov. Christie, and approval by the state's Division of Gaming Enforcement.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Veteran state Democratic lawmakers, including two seeking higher office, are calling for a go-slow, more-study approach to public financing of professional sports stadiums. "What good are government investments in world-class sports and entertainment facilities if a majority of the public does not benefit?" asked state Rep. Andrew Carn, D-Philadelphia. House Democratic Whip Ivan Itkin of Pittsburgh said fear of sports teams leaving cities creates "hysteria" and cited a need to "mold stadium financing plans that really benefit the community.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
We all have our ways of marking the seasons. I know it's spring when in early April I start my morning by skipping the Washington Post front page and going right to the sports section. It's not until I've fully savored the baseball box scores that I resignedly turn to politics. My non-baseball friends are forever puzzled by my devotion to the game. I agree entirely with them about the irrationality of fandom. Why should a grown man with a house, a family, two jobs, and a cat named Will Feral (brought in from the cold and now largely domesticated, like the Danish King Canute by the English)
SPORTS
April 14, 2016 | By David Murphy, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
On an April night in 1973, a kid from Roxborough stood in front of the Spectrum and listened to a muffled roar explode through its walls. He did not go in. Could not go in, really. Hell, they couldn't even watch it on TV. They were Roxborough kids, the sons of machinists, of factory foremen, of Marine Corps vets who returned from Korea and spent the rest of their lives cobbling together a living on the ground floor of the industrial complex that enabled such entanglements. Funny how it works: You risk your life to protect the capital, you manufacture the material to construct the building, and then you stand outside and listen to the crowd.
SPORTS
July 18, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
It's not supposed to be this easy. It's supposed to take time, a lot of hard work and endless patience. Failure should precede success, and only those who can overcome it get to achieve greatness. At the moment, the expected timeline for a professional athlete's progression is being eaten alive by the ultra-talented young in a variety of sports. Start with baseball. Fox's theme for Tuesday night's All-Star Game telecast was baseball's youth movement and it was born of validity.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dish Network, the nation's third-largest pay-TV company, may drop NBCUniversal's regional sports networks in the Chicago, Washington, Sacramento, and San Francisco areas on Dec. 1. The plan seems to be part of a strategy to slim down the bundle of cable channels offered to its TV subscribers, to control price increases. Dish axed the Boston-area regional sports network in August. Comcast Corp. owns NBCUniversal and the Comcast-branded regional sports networks. Regional sports networks can be the second-most-expensive networks in a cable bundle - exceeded only by ESPN - because of the billions of dollars the networks have committed in recent years to acquiring TV rights for professional sports.
SPORTS
May 19, 2014 | By Ed Rendell, For the Daily News
THE PRESIDENT of the United States is required once a year to report to Congress on the "State of the Union. " It is often more of a campaign speech for the policies the president wants to enact, but, in a tip of the hat to tradition, the president always ends with the reassuring words, "the state of the union is strong!" When thinking about this, I decided that mid-May might be a perfect time for my report on the "the state of professional sports in Philadelphia. " If we polled the sports fans of our city and gave them a choice of "strong," "fair" or "weak," my guess is that "weak" would come in a solid first, followed by "fair," with "strong" in dead last.
SPORTS
March 1, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
More than seven weeks elapsed last year between the time an inebriated Riley Cooper shouted a racial slur at a security guard keeping him from the backstage presence of Kenny Chesney and when the cellphone video of that incident was made public. In the interim, a lot of things happened. The video made its way from the phone of a young lady who was hanging on the periphery of the action that evening and into the hands of some high-quality friends who eventually thought they would like to make some money by messing up someone else's life.
SPORTS
March 9, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the Chicago Blackhawks try to surpass a record unbeaten streak set by the 1979-80 Flyers, Bob Clarke wishes them no ill will. "Not at all," Clarke, the onetime Flyers star who is now the organization's senior vice president, said the other day. "The way I feel, I hope the young people do more than what the athletes in my generation did. " Clarke, then 30 and in his first year as a playing assistant coach, was one of the leaders as the Flyers...
SPORTS
January 22, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he was growing up in Memphis, the city where the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 45 years ago, 76ers forward Thaddeus Young was assigned a job by his parents. Whenever friends and family visited, Young assumed the role of unofficial tour guide for trips to the National Civil Rights Museum, built around the former Lorraine Motel, where an assassin's bullet snuffed out King's life in 1968. "I've been there about 30 times," Young said. "We went there on school trips right through high school.
NEWS
December 23, 2012 | By David Porter and Bruce Shipkowski, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Four major professional sports leagues and the NCAA are poised to move forward with their legal fight over New Jersey's plans to allow sports gambling. That comes after a judge on Friday rejected arguments that the leagues could not prove they would be harmed if the state proceeded with the plans. In denying the state's request to dismiss the lawsuit by the NBA, NHL, NFL, Major League Baseball, and the NCAA, U.S. District Judge Michael Shipp agreed that they had standing to file the suit because expanding legal sports betting to New Jersey would harm perception of their games.
SPORTS
November 19, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
When quarterback Nick Foles takes the field for the Eagles on Sunday against the Redskins, his start will be a welcome novelty to fans longing for something different, an oasis of change in the stagnant desert of this 3-6 season. For the Eagles organization, however, Foles' first start is freighted with much more than that. The afternoon of work against the Redskins is a hold-your-breath game for everyone from owner Jeffrey Lurie down to the assistant dispenser of wristbands. The organization has to decide about Nick Foles.
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