CollectionsProfit
IN THE NEWS

Profit

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What makes a company valuable? In the stock markets, where software writers, oil refiners, toy-makers and bomb builders compete for the same investor dollars, it doesn't matter what you make, or even how much you sell; it's how much profit investors expect you're going to keep that determines share prices. Thirteen Philadelphia-area companies rank on the Standard & Poor's list of 500 big publicly traded corporations. The most valuable is Comcast Corp. , the Philadelphia-based cable TV, Internet and phone company, which earned $2.5 billion on gross sales of $25 billion last year, and was worth $64 billion - based on the price Wall Street assigns to its shares - on the Nasdaq Stock Market at the start of November.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vishay Intertechnology Inc. of Malvern said yesterday that its second-quarter profit fell to $9.7 million, or 5 cents a share, from $41.1 million, or 22 cents a share, in the year-earlier period, because of lower sales and special expenses. Second-quarter sales dropped to $581.6 million from $646.7 million in the 2004 quarter. Gerald Paul, Vishay's president and chief executive officer, said in a conference call that the company expected third-quarter sales of $560 million to $580 million and profit to be flat or slightly lower than in the 2004 third quarter.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Trans World Airlines chairman Carl C. Icahn yesterday predicted that the carrier would post a third-quarter profit, its first in more than a year, because of increased overseas bookings and lower labor costs. He also told shareholders at their annual meeting that he plans to have $1 billion in cash by the end of the year and hopes to use it to acquire another carrier. "With our cost structure so low, we believe we'll be in a good position to consolidate," he said, although he declined to be more specific about when or with what airline such a merger might occur.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Strawbridge & Clothier, the Philadelphia department-store operator, yesterday said that despite lower sales, continued cost control allowed it to earn a profit in the second quarter. Last year, it reported a loss for the quarter. The company said sales were down slightly because of less advertising this year than in 1993. But the cost of sales dropped from 77.2 percent of sales to 76.1 percent this year because of lower occupancy and buying costs and fewer markdowns, the company said.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Executives of the local research and development company Biosonics told shareholders yesterday that the company is pinning its immediate hopes to the success of an electronic device that can help people who have bowel control problems. Food and Drug Administration approval of the Biosonics Anotron incontinence system paves the way for the company - which has spent more than $5 million developing new applications for electronics in medicine - to make the transition to manufacturing and marketing, according to chairman Jack Paller.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
Westmoreland Coal Co. yesterday said it earned $5.8 million or 71 cents a share in the second quarter, in contrast with a $732,000 or 9-cent-per-share loss a year earlier. The turnaround for the Philadelphia-based company came as coal sales rose 5.9 percent, to $146.5 million compared with $138.4 million sold in the second quarter of 1985. Total revenue, which includes non-coal subsidiaries, was $157.8 million, compared with $150.2 million in 1985. The company also kept its costs down, according to chairman E.B. Leisenring Jr. Earnings for the first half of 1986 were $10.4 million or $1.28 per share, compared with a loss of $3.3 million or 40 cents per share in the first half of 1985, the company said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
When The 1986 Miss Teen USA Pageant begins tonight on CBS (9 p.m., Channel 10), the screen will be filled with attractive scenery: 51 young women and the sands and surf of Florida's Daytona Beach. In business terms, the location is no less important than the competition. "Look at the sheer economics of it, at the simplest facts of what a pageant is," says George B. Honchar, president of Miss Universe Inc. "Nowadays, city governments are big business. . . . Everyone is very, very sensitive and alert to promotion.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Profits at Charter Power Systems Inc. jumped 85 percent in the second quarter, the Plymouth Meeting maker of batteries said yesterday. "Although slow economic activity is affecting the industries we serve, technical manufacturing improvements, production and purchasing efficiencies, targeted marketing and sales successes and changes in late 1989 to a new debt structure . . . have helped produce the improved results for Charter Power," said Robert...
BUSINESS
August 10, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Cost-cutting efforts paid off in a big way in the second quarter at Vishay Intertechnology Inc., the Malvern maker of electronic resistors, sensors and other components. The company said its profits rose by nearly two-thirds on a modest increase in sales. "We are pleased that the effects of our planned cost-reduction programs are now starting to be seen in our results," said Felix Zandman, chairman and chief executive officer. "These programs will continue to be a high priority.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1993 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charming Shoppes Inc. (Nasdaq), the Bensalem women's-apparel retailer, yesterday reported that earnings were dampened in the third quarter by more promotional markdowns than planned. The company, which operates nearly 1,300 stores under the name Fashion Bug, also said its earnings for the year were below expectations. Bernard Brodsky, the company's treasurer, said that after strong holiday sales last year, Charming Shoppes brought in additional merchandise for this year. But continued economic weakness and bad weather hurt sales, forcing Charming Shoppes to mark prices down, he added.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a month now, spies have been slipping into a nondescript shop near Jewelers Row. Their mission, according to witnesses, was urgent. "Espionage," said Pam Bonfiglio, who has watched each glide down the long hall past her and her husband's jewelry shop, aiming for a tucked-away room with white walls. The spooks' target: an insurgent hoagie maker in baseball cap, shorts, and sneakers. A Vietnam War veteran, barely 5-foot-7. A Marine, 67, named Fink. According to eyewitness Joseph Bonfiglio, Pam Bonfiglio's husband, one pizza delivery guy infiltrated Fink's sandwich shop on 132 S. Eighth St. on orders from his boss.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines, Philadelphia's largest air carrier, said Friday that its second-quarter profit nearly doubled to $1.7 billion on cheaper jet fuel. The Dallas-based carrier, which transports 76 percent of air travelers in Philadelphia, said it would pass some of the gains on to investors by buying back stock. American said it repurchased more than $750 million of stock, and announced an additional $2 billion buyback plan. Second-quarter revenue fell 4.6 percent to $10.8 billion, slightly below analysts' estimates.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
AS A CITY, we've gotten pretty good at attracting and handling crowds, and with the number of visitors growing year after year, we get more and more practice. Thanks in part to the smart management of the city's "Visit Philadelphia" tourism office, the number of visitors has increased every year for the past 18 years, with 39 million domestic visitors in 2013. This provided more than $10 billion in economic impact in that year alone, creating jobs and activity in hospitality and beyond.
NEWS
June 19, 2015
DEAR HARRY: I guess I'm the kid everyone knows who came from the hood, never got into any real trouble, tried hard to get a good education, but couldn't get into college. I'm a two-time loser, because neither my grades nor my entrance exams were good enough. The result was that I let myself get swindled into a deal with a so-called for-profit college. They showed me all kinds of numbers, pictures, testimonials and beautiful facilities together with a generous loan program that looked like one step below heaven . . . no repayments until I got my first job. Almost nothing turned out to be what they said.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Vatican archbishop in charge of overseeing the World Meeting of Families is reportedly under investigation for possible embezzlement, according to several European news organizations. Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, president of the Pontifical Council for the Family, reported bought a 14th-century castle in Umbria at an artficially low price with the intention of reselling it for a profit a full market value. "The alleged scam would have netted a profit" of about $4.4 million, according to the British newspaper The Independent.
NEWS
May 12, 2015
WE AGAIN find ourselves contending with the aftermath of an attack fueled by abusive cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him. As an American Muslim, I am both saddened and confused by the frequency with which events like this are taking place around the world. To the Muslims engaging in these acts of violence, I say that we should respond to abusive cartoons by following the example set by the Prophet Muhammad, who repeatedly tolerated abuse and responded with love. To the groups who continue to perpetuate abusive depictions of the Prophet Muhammad, I ask what they intend to gain from their actions.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
American Airlines, Philadelphia's dominant air carrier, reported Friday a record $1.2 billion profit in the first three months of this year, mainly because of lower fuel prices. American earned $402 million in the same period last year. Jet-fuel costs dropped 42.2 percent in the three months ended March 31 compared to the same period last year. Management said that although passenger travel demand remained healthy, revenue was impacted by a stronger U.S. dollar, foreign currency fluctuations, competition on international routes, and economic softness in Latin America.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delta Air Lines said Wednesday that its Trainer refinery in Delaware County posted an $86 million profit in the first quarter of this year. Delta said the sharp drop in crude oil prices would translate into a $2.2 billion savings in jet-fuel costs in 2015. "Over the last four quarters, the refinery has produced a cumulative profit of over $220 million," chief financial officer Paul Jacobson said during a conference call on the company's earnings. Delta, whose report began airlines' earnings season, said it expected that the refinery would make about $80 million in the second quarter.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Jeff Davis took a gutsy step three years ago buying a rundown commercial property for $105,000 in East Germantown. The 41-year-old father of two did so based on one simple truth: You can't fashion a serving bowl from a digital track of the Beatles - or any other recording artists for that matter. But you can from vinyl. His company, Vinylux, uses predominantly 33s and 45s for its designs, although products involving 78s are coming. The outgrowth of a school project while Davis was pursuing a master's degree in industrial design at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD)
BUSINESS
February 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Horsham-based Toll Bros. saw profits climb 78 percent in its fiscal first quarter as the luxury-home builder sold more houses at higher prices. First-quarter net income was $81.3 million, or 44 cents a share, compared with $45.6 million, or 25 cents a share, in the same period in 2014, Toll reported Tuesday. Revenue in the fiscal first quarter, which ended Jan. 31, was $853.5 million, 33 percent higher than the $643.7 million of the year-ago quarter, the home builder said. Toll said it delivered 1,091 homes in the quarter, 18 percent more than the 928 of a year ago. The average price of those houses was $782,300, compared with $693,600 in the same quarter of 2014, Toll reported.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|