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Profit

BUSINESS
September 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
House leaders in Washington on Thursday introduced legislation to allow Amtrak to reinvest Northeast Corridor profits on improvements to the corridor, rather than to use that money to subsidize money-losing, long-distance routes in other parts of the country. The bill proposes many changes in how the national railroad is funded and how it operates. It was sponsored by top Republican and Democratic members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, giving it instant bipartisan support.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. reported solid second-quarter earnings, with revenue climbing modestly at 3.5 percent to $16.8 billion and profit shooting ahead 14.8 percent to $2 billion. The company lost 144,000 TV subscribers - an improvement over the 162,000 lost a year ago - and added 203,000 high-speed Internet customers. Brian L. Roberts, the company's chief executive officer and chairman, said that it was the cable division's best second-quarter performance in six years. Comcast typically loses cable-TV subscribers in the second quarter because of college students' canceling service, and people going on summer vacations to second homes.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Independence Blue Cross' profits tumbled last year to their lowest level since the region's largest health insurer lost money in 2008 and 2009, according to IBC's annual report on its website. The Center City company reported net income of $142.6 million in 2013, down by a quarter from $191.5 million in 2012, despite a 5 percent increase in revenue, the annual report's bare-bones financial statement said. Total revenue was $11.05 billion, up from $10.48 billion, the company said.
SPORTS
June 2, 2014
TWO THINGS happened this past week that triggered an idea in my hyperactive mind. First came news that the ownership of the Chicago Cubs said that the team would move out of Wrigley Field if the state and local governments did not go along with the renovations the hallowed ballpark so desperately needs. Second, the estranged wife of Clippers owner Donald Sterling indicated that she might sell the team before the NBA owners meet next week, and former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer could pay $2 billion for the same team the Sterlings originally paid $12.5 million for. Wow!
BUSINESS
May 30, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
  More sales and increased prices boosted Toll Bros. Inc.'s second-quarter profits more than 21/2 times higher than in the same period in 2013, the Horsham luxury-home builder reported Wednesday. Net income for the three months ended April 30 rose to $65.2 million, or $0.35 per share, compared with $24.7 million, or $0.14 per share, in the 2013 second quarter, the company said. The builder delivered 1,218 houses in the quarter, compared with 894 in the 2013 period. Revenue of $860.4 million this year was 67 percent higher than second-quarter 2013's $516 million, reflecting not only more sales completed but higher sale prices - $706,000 versus $577,000.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Profit margins turned down last year at hospitals in Southeastern Pennsylvania after two years of improvement following the recession, data released Wednesday showed. The average operating margin at 19 hospitals in Philadelphia fell to 4.59 percent in the 12 months ended last June 30 from 4.68 percent the year before, the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council's report said. Strong performances at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - the two largest hospitals in the region by total revenue - buoyed overall results in the city.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although the severe winter led to thousands of flight cancellations, American Airlines and Southwest Airlines reported record first-quarter profits that beat analysts' expectations. JetBlue Airways eked out a profit in what is the seasonally weakest period for airlines. United Airlines posted a loss. All the airlines said the outlook for spring and summer was good. American and US Airways, whose merger created the world's largest airline, posted a net profit of $480 million. As separate companies, American, which was in Chapter 11 bankruptcy, and US Airways lost a combined total of $297 million a year ago. The profit was helped by the sale of takeoff and landing slots at Washington's Reagan National Airport, which the Justice Department required to settle an antitrust lawsuit against the merger.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia delivered some relatively positive financial news Friday. Catholic Health Care Services, for example, which operates six nursing homes and a retirement home, had an operating profit of $3.9 million in the year ended June 30. Results at the facilities, which have been for sale since the summer, improved significantly from a loss of $497,454 the previous year, according to an audited financial statement released Friday....
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's been a challenging couple of months for airlines: Winter storms caused American Airlines and US Airways to cancel a combined 28,000 flights, a 164 percent increase from a year ago. JetBlue Airways scrapped 3,900 flights, while United Airlines scrubbed 23,000 due to weather in January and February. Despite the harsh winter, major U.S. carriers expect healthy profits in 2014 - and a record volume of passengers this spring. Speaking at an investor conference in New York City on Monday, airline executives said the travel outlook was good, thanks to an improving economy and flat or lower fuel prices.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Farmers call them "flying rats" or "deer with wings. " They gather by the tens of thousands every year about this time to graze on sprouting winter wheat, rye, alfalfa, and barley. They're voracious, persistent, and dirty, leaving behind a trail of droppings. Canada geese. "You see a couple, then 10, 50, 100, 300," said farmer Ray Hlubik, 61, of Chesterfield, Burlington County. Soon, like a scene from Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, "they cover a whole field. "They decimated my alfalfa last year," Hlubik said.
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