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NEWS
February 28, 2007 | DAVID MAIALETTI/Daily News
FABRICIO RODRIGUEZ (left) and Eduardo Soriano of Jobs with Justice rally with faculty and staff at Community College of Philadelphia in a two-hour display of frustration over contract issues, including health insurance.
SPORTS
November 26, 2001 | By Rich Fisher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Rowan football offense has become so good, it may have become a victim of its own success. Which is just fine with the Profs. During Saturday's 43-13 win over Western Connecticut in a second-round NCAA Division III playoff game, the Profs held a 26-0 halftime lead despite not looking overly impressive in the eyes of some observers. An unfair assessment? "Yeah, it is," coach K.C. Keeler said. "But even so, we were frustrated and it's something we really have to try and guard against.
SPORTS
November 24, 1990 | By Marc Narducci, Special to The Inquirer
At the beginning of the Division III national soccer tournament, Glassboro State College was considered a long shot at best. The Profs had been decimated by injuries and entered the tournament ranked 16th nationally in the Division III coaches poll. Glassboro closed out the regular season by dropping a 2-0 decision to 1989 national champion Elizabethtown, and most observers felt that the Blue Jays were a prohibitive choice to repeat. The Profs, however, picked the best time of the season to play their best soccer.
SPORTS
January 14, 1993 | By Rich Fisher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Adrian Matthew got his first start at Rowan, Keith Wood came off the bench for the first time this season, and both made a difference in the Profs' 85-58 victory over visiting Trenton State last night in a New Jersey Athletic Conference game. Rowan remained undefeated this season as Matthew, a junior transfer from Millersville, collected 19 points and six rebounds. Wood, Rowan's leading scorer at 21.5 points per game, added a game-high 23 points. According to Rowan coach John Giannini, Wood didn't start the game because he had missed practice, and Matthew got the call because Giannini went with a three-guard lineup.
SPORTS
December 5, 2004 | By Rich Fisher INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It took about an hour for Rowan to render the second half completely unnecessary while putting an end to some talk that it also felt was unnecessary. The top-seeded Profs rolled to a 42-0 halftime lead en route to a 56-7 victory over previously unbeaten Delaware Valley in yesterday's NCAA Division III playoff quarterfinal game. In breaking the 1999 school record of 55 points in a playoff game (against Ursinus), Rowan earned its ninth trip to the national semifinals. The Profs did it without leading rusher Pat Thompson, who suffered a season-ending knee injury last week.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Some of Cheyney University's 145 faculty members face dismissal as a result of economic findings in the just-completed review of the institution's academic status, university president LeVerne McCummings said today. McCummings noted that a report issued yesterday by the Middle States Association of Schools and Colleges, although continuing Cheyney's accreditation through October 1988, still mentioned several "concerns," one of which was a budget deficit. McCummings said the university's faculty-student ratio now stands at 1-11 although state regulations require only a 1-19 ratio.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | by Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
When Taman Bryant is introduced as the starting wide receiver for Rowan University in tomorrow's Division III national championship in Salem, Va., the 6-foot-2, 225-pound junior will be greeted with a warm and thunderous ovation. Probably more so than any of his teammates. Not because he's more popular than his fellow players, or more productive either, although he does lead the team with 1,135 receiving yards. It's just that he'll have quite an entourage that will be making the trip to see his Profs (10-2)
NEWS
September 16, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Temple University's faculty union, frustrated over what members term "difficult" contract talks, could vote this week to authorize a strike. Members of Temple's branch of the American Association of University Professors - representing about 1,100 faculty, librarians and other professional staff members - have been without a contract since June 30, when the previous two-year pact had expired. A membership meeting is scheduled for Thursday and a strike-authorization vote, while not on the agenda, "may come up," Temple AAUP president Phil Yannella said yesterday.
SPORTS
November 27, 1998 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Rowan (10-2) and Buffalo State (9-2) won't need any introductions when they meet at noon tomorrow in Glassboro, N.J., in an NCAA Division III quarterfinal. Rowan defeated Buffalo State, 28-21, on Oct. 10. Lifetime, the Profs are 5-0 vs. the Bengals. The Profs advanced in the playoffs by beating College of New Jersey, 26-2, in the first round. Buffalo State outlasted Springfield (Mass.), 38-35. "It's difficult to beat a good team twice [in one season]," Rowan coach K.C. Keeler said.
SPORTS
December 12, 2004 | By John Nolen FOR THE INQUIRER
Rowan was anything but the Beast of the East yesterday, as powerful Linfield turned the Profs inside out in a stunning 52-0 mismatch in the NCAA Division III football semifinals. The Profs (10-3), plagued by turnovers and dropped passes, were limited to 198 yards of offense while attempting to reach the national championship game for the sixth time. Instead, Linfield (12-0), the West Region champion and No. 2 in the coaches' poll, is headed for the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl, where the talented and impressive Wildcats will play Mary Hardin-Baylor of Texas for the championship Saturday in Salem, Va. "We played a tremendous football team in all three phases of the game: offense, defense and special teams," Rowan coach Jay Accorsi said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
Drexel professor André M. Carrington has been a longtime devotee of comic books, science fiction, and everything dorky. His first book, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction , is a thoughtful analysis of the genre's attempts to grapple with ethnicity. In it he ranges over delightfully vast tracts of fiction, from the Marvel comics empire to the fantasy world of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the representations of black women from the British imperial diaspora.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Here in the U.S., a product developer is politely shooed out the door by a major video game company after proposing a game that helps people recover from a stroke or deal with their cerebral palsy, said health games innovator Pam Kato. In Britain, by contrast, "Serious Games" is a category now being pursued by hospitals and universities, funded with national health grants, earning positive publicity and wide software distribution. "When I saw that Coventry University even had a building named Serious Health Institute, I knew I was home," said the U.S.-born Kato, who now directs that institute.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Mark Fazlollah, STAFF WRITERS
The Temple physics professor whose life was turned upside down when the U.S. government filed and later withdrew espionage charges against him has been notified that the government will not refile the charges. "The U.S. Attorney's Office has notified Professor [Xiaoxing] Xi's defense team that there will be no new charges and that the government will return his seized property," said Michael A. Schwartz, one of Xi's lawyers. Whether the government might recharge Xi had been an open question since September, when prosecutors withdrew the existing charges "without prejudice," meaning that they could be revived.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
When Temple University said it wanted to hire her, Sara Goldrick-Rab asked: "Are you sure you know who I am? Use Google. Read Twitter. Come back and talk to me. " Temple officials had already done that. They knew that the 39-year-old educational policy studies and sociology professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison had gained a national reputation as a social media firebrand. She had called Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker a "fascist" on Twitter for wanting to weaken tenure protections.
SPORTS
February 10, 2016 | BY MIKE KERN, Staff Writer
SO HOW many basketball teams ever have three post-graduate players? "I put the question out there, on a Division III message (site)," said Dan Drutz, Rowan's assistant athletic director for communications. "I didn't get a response. " So the Profs are unique. They're also 19-3 (13-2 in the New Jersey Athletic Conference), even with an overtime loss on Saturday at Kean. That's already the most wins for the program in just over a decade, which has put them in position to get into the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2000.
SPORTS
November 29, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The other day, Rowan University basketball coach Joe Cassidy sat on the team bus, crawling behind a school bus in Mullica Hill, his Profs headed for a game across the Commodore Barry Bridge. The coach talked on the phone about the play that changed everything. "Demetrius is two seats in front of me right now," Cassidy said over the phone. "Guess what we're talking about?" Cassidy shouted ahead to Poles, now a Rowan assistant. The play has everything to do with Saturday's big local hoop event, La Salle at Rowan.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
I'm sitting here trying to write the first paragraphs for this article, and the pressure is on. The story is about a Penn professor who teaches creativity, for God's sake, meaning I'd better come up with something creative or he will think I'm dull. Worse, my readers will quit this story and turn to a report about some sports team that wears green jerseys. Wouldn't it be great if there were a proven method I could use to alleviate my anxiety and devise something creative, other than the traditional techniques of lining my paper clips up by size, biting my nails, and drinking coffee?
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
His cell sat directly above the torture chamber in the East German prison, Frederic Pryor recalled, but he didn't know it at the time. He only knew that he could occasionally hear screams. Of the international Cold War drama that swirled outside the jailhouse walls, and the chance it could spark his freedom, he knew nothing, kept in the dark by his communist captors. Now, everyone knows. The new Steven Spielberg movie, Bridge of Spies , tells the tense, true story of how the United States and the Soviet Union traded spy for spy at a moment when each nation threatened the nuclear annihilation of the other.
NEWS
September 21, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FEDERAL JUDGE yesterday formally dismissed charges against a Temple University physics professor who had been accused of sharing sensitive technology with his native China. U.S. District Judge R. Barclay Surrick signed the one-page order without elaborating on the case. Xiaoxing Xi, 57, the former chairman of Temple's physics department, had been indicted on four counts of wire fraud in May. A week ago yesterday, prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia filed a motion to drop the charges against Xi. Xi's lead attorney, Peter Zeidenberg, of Arent Fox in Washington,has said "the government had made a significant mistake [in indicting Xi]
NEWS
September 16, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Temple University's Science Education and Research Center, home to the university's physics department, students trudged in and out of offices, mingled on couches, and toiled in labs. It was, seemingly, an ordinary Monday, a rarity for the research center in recent months. Since Xiaoxing Xi, the department chairman, was accused of selling sensitive U.S. defense technology to entities in China, the department has operated in a state of uncertainty. The highly regarded physics professor remained largely out of sight, his colleagues stunned and his students yearning for his guidance.
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