CollectionsProgram Notes
IN THE NEWS

Program Notes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | By Peter Dobrin, Special to The Inquirer
You've heard there are some particularly challenging works on tonight's concert, and have made a point of showing up 15 or 20 minutes early to take a look at the program notes. The titles of the pieces were enough to arouse your curiosity - Amplifier and Reflector I for open umbrella, glass baking dish and amplified clock; Bird and Person Dyning; and Solo Female Voice and Pure Wave Oscillators. Flipping past pages of advertisements, who's-who listings and forthcoming events, you look for something to help you understand what you are about to hear.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The water ran out after the first day at sea. The boat engine quit on the second. Hien Cao, 22, clutched her 2-year-old daughter and 6-month-old son. They and 25 others had crowded onto a five-person fishing boat, the captain paid in gold to steer them to freedom. Now, the sun beating down as the vessel drifted off the southern coast of Vietnam, Cao felt numb. She'd taken this chance, this escape from a country that had become a prison, to give her children a better life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's tempting to think of John Hodian's music as a soundtrack to a lifestyle, rather than music that stands on its own. And if we had to choose which lifestyle that would be, it might go something like this: Dressed all in black, you're on a high-speed train, sipping herbal tea and skimming the Utne Reader. As you bite into an organically grown, carob-covered craisin, you wonder whether WXPN will come in on your Walkman . . . You get the picture. Hodian's music - specifically, 1 is Not Greater Than 3, premiered Friday night at the Ethical Society by Relache - leaves a lot of time for listeners to think about other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1992 | By Ken Keuffel Jr., FOR THE INQUIRER
If anything really disappointed me about Saturday's New Jersey Symphony Orchestra concert at the War Memorial theater here, it was that Pinchas Zukerman did not play the violin more. Zukerman, introduced by a roving spotlight that made him squint in discomfort, appeared only once as soloist, in Bach's Concerto No. 1 in A minor. As Saturday's program notes suggest, the Bach (a typically Baroque concerto) is not "the heroic contrast or contest between soloist and orchestra" that concertgoers normally encounter.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The title Vermilion Vespers was an immediate tipoff that whatever the religious functions of a vespers service, this one would be anything but sanctimonious. Even so, the freewheeling, evening-length work that unfolded from the Haverford-based composer Curt Cacioppo — and opened the Crossing choir's "Month of Moderns" festival Saturday at Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill — was more like a musical funhouse in which arresting effects were cheek-by-jowl with less-than-stunning miscalculations.
NEWS
July 13, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Paul J. Horsley has been named program annotator and musicologist for the Philadelphia Orchestra, effective this month. Horsley succeeds Bernard Jacobson, who left the orchestra in December to become artistic director of the Residentie of the Hague, although he continued to send his program notes from abroad. Jacobson had held the post since 1984. Horsley comes from Houston, where he was a contributing editor and classical music editor of the Houston Press. He is also a staff writer for the Harvard Dictionary of Musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2005 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Paule Turner and Group Motion Dance Company present two very different takes on the search for love and acceptance at the New Festival at the Arts Bank. Turner, with his dance company, court, uses extreme shock to describe the injustice and prejudice he faces being a gay black-male performance artist in Touched, which premiered Wednesday. The festival Web site, the program notes, and even Turner himself in the middle of the piece warn that the performance includes full frontal nudity, violent images and graphic language.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
World premieres are common enough, and surely music from the past has a secure place in the standard repertoire. But when was the last time you heard something written 20 years ago? It happens all too rarely, but an audience at Swarthmore College's Lang Concert Hall got lucky Friday night, when Orchestra 2001 played Gerald Levinson's in dark (three poems of the night). Scored for soprano and a small ensemble of low, resonant instruments, the work was written in 1972, and represented what the composer called in the program notes a "coming of age. . . . It opened the way to an inclusive, wide-ranging approach to musical style, embracing tonality, non-tonality and modality, Western and Eastern, which I have continued to develop in ever-wider contexts since that time.
NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betty Schoenfeld Levin, 80, a gifted pianist, music educator, and writer who aspired to be a dancer, died of cancer Tuesday at her home in Philadelphia. Before moving to Center City last year, Mrs. Levin had been a longtime resident of Montgomery County. In 1954, her husband, Monroe Levin, cofounded the Jenkintown Music School with Cameron McGraw. Mrs. Levin taught piano at the school and wrote news releases and program notes for concerts at the school. "My father had the ideas," their daughter Anne Levin Benedict said, "and my mother implemented them.
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Piffaro turned listeners into detectives Friday night, sorting through musical ideas that would survive and flourish over the next five centuries, as well as puzzling over those that would end up as stylistic dead-ends. Actually, the Philadelphia Renaissance band constructed its concert around an entirely different idea. The program, heard at St. Mark's Church, was intended as a look at composers through their publishers, specifically the important publishers of Venice, Milan, Rome, Paris, and Lyons.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The title Vermilion Vespers was an immediate tipoff that whatever the religious functions of a vespers service, this one would be anything but sanctimonious. Even so, the freewheeling, evening-length work that unfolded from the Haverford-based composer Curt Cacioppo — and opened the Crossing choir's "Month of Moderns" festival Saturday at Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill — was more like a musical funhouse in which arresting effects were cheek-by-jowl with less-than-stunning miscalculations.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The water ran out after the first day at sea. The boat engine quit on the second. Hien Cao, 22, clutched her 2-year-old daughter and 6-month-old son. They and 25 others had crowded onto a five-person fishing boat, the captain paid in gold to steer them to freedom. Now, the sun beating down as the vessel drifted off the southern coast of Vietnam, Cao felt numb. She'd taken this chance, this escape from a country that had become a prison, to give her children a better life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Sure, 1812 Productions is running Neil Simon's Laughter on the 23rd Floor in repertory with Our Show of Shows , the company's tribute to Sid Caesar's 90-minute weekly live comedy program, Your Show of Shows . And sure, Simon's work is better known, a look behind the door of the writer's room - a room that variously contained Mel Brooks, Larry Gelbart, Woody Allen, Carl Reiner, and Simon himself during the show's 1950-1954 run. ...
NEWS
February 16, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Piffaro turned listeners into detectives Friday night, sorting through musical ideas that would survive and flourish over the next five centuries, as well as puzzling over those that would end up as stylistic dead-ends. Actually, the Philadelphia Renaissance band constructed its concert around an entirely different idea. The program, heard at St. Mark's Church, was intended as a look at composers through their publishers, specifically the important publishers of Venice, Milan, Rome, Paris, and Lyons.
NEWS
January 9, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Though this cannot be proved, Jeremy Denk probably holds the record for playing the most notes in a two-hour Philadelphia piano recital - Monday's program, with three of the chunkier sonatas written over the last century. Denk's advocacy wasn't always thoughtful, but never was there a note too many. Presented by Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, the recital was built around Charles Ives' Mount Rushmore-like Concord Sonata in a performance that's the most fully realized I've heard in concert or on recordings, preceded by early Elliott Carter and late Leon Kirchner.
NEWS
June 12, 2006 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Usually dance should stand on its own. This time, a little explanation would have gone a long way to turn it from bizarre to intriguing. Devynn Emory, Amanda Miller and Renee Robinson-Buzby presented duets Saturday in "In Performance: The Choreographers Project 2006" at Susan Hess Modern Dance Studio. The three resident artists at the Hess studio each created a dance in March as part of a 48-hour choreography project. They were given challenges - to use a word, a piece of music, a prop or a stage direction, for example - in the work.
NEWS
August 10, 2005
Unlike the fictional Starship Enterprise, America's space shuttles won't be boldly going anywhere for a while. Now that the Discovery has returned to Earth safely, the shuttle fleet will remain grounded until NASA is certain there won't be a recurrence of fuel tank insulation and other problems. Shuttle Atlantis's crew expected a September launch, but that date is unlikely to be kept. Discovery's mission to the International Space Station was considered a test flight, the first since Columbia blew up during reentry in 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2005 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Paule Turner and Group Motion Dance Company present two very different takes on the search for love and acceptance at the New Festival at the Arts Bank. Turner, with his dance company, court, uses extreme shock to describe the injustice and prejudice he faces being a gay black-male performance artist in Touched, which premiered Wednesday. The festival Web site, the program notes, and even Turner himself in the middle of the piece warn that the performance includes full frontal nudity, violent images and graphic language.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2003 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The solution to the supposed contemporary music problem is, in some quarters, to take lessons from the vitality and immediacy of pop and jazz. Most composers heard in the Kimmel Center's important new Fresh Ink concert series have done precisely that, and, in Thursday's program, the results definitely grabbed your attention. That's no replacement, however, for that which gives classical music a shot at being classical: the sense of long, deep consideration behind the notes. There are few wrong ways to attract attention to the perpetually alienated living composer, but there must be something to draw listeners back for repeat visits.
NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betty Schoenfeld Levin, 80, a gifted pianist, music educator, and writer who aspired to be a dancer, died of cancer Tuesday at her home in Philadelphia. Before moving to Center City last year, Mrs. Levin had been a longtime resident of Montgomery County. In 1954, her husband, Monroe Levin, cofounded the Jenkintown Music School with Cameron McGraw. Mrs. Levin taught piano at the school and wrote news releases and program notes for concerts at the school. "My father had the ideas," their daughter Anne Levin Benedict said, "and my mother implemented them.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|