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NEWS
April 19, 2011
Carolyn Gale Miles, 64, of Glen Mills, a statistical programmer and social activist, died Thursday, March 31, of pancreatic cancer at home. For six years, Ms. Miles had been principal programmer for Customized Improvement Strategies at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals in Wilmington. Previously, she had been a programmer in epidemiology research at two other pharmaceutical companies and at the University of Pennsylvania. A native of Blue Point, N.Y., Ms. Miles earned a bachelor's degree from Western College in Oxford, Ohio, and a master's in public health from Emory University in Atlanta.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Querubin, 83, of Seminole, Fla., a programmer for Radio Corp. of America in the 1960s, died of diseases related to aging Saturday, May 30, at Freedom Square Rehabilitation & Nursing Services there. He lived with his family in Cherry Hill from the 1960s to the late 1980s. Born in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Querubin graduated from La Salle College High School in 1949 and, with a full scholarship, earned a bachelor's degree in English literature at La Salle University in 1953. "He started his own computer systems programming company in the late 1950s, in Philadelphia," daughter Cecile said.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A network programmer accused of setting off a "computer bomb" in his former company's system, causing the loss of valuable data and millions of dollars in damage, was convicted yesterday on one count of computer sabotage. Authorities have called Timothy A. Lloyd's 10-day trial the nation's first in a computer-sabotage case. Lloyd, 37, the former chief network programmer at Omega Engineering Inc. in Bridgeport, Gloucester County, was tried in U.S. District Court in Newark. He was accused of intentionally causing $10 million in damage to Omega's computers and of stealing $50,000 worth of hardware and software equipment and transporting it across state lines to his home in Wilmington.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph George Iffrig Jr., 52, formerly of Fountainville in Bucks County, a systems programmer at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Bowie, Md., and a specialist in telemetry, died last Friday while on a walking track at the center. The medical examiner's office in Bowie said the cause of death had not been determined. Mr. Iffrig had worked for Honeywell International and its Bendix Engineering unit as a systems programmer for 27 years. He joined Bendix, which was a subcontractor to NASA and the U.S. space program, after serving in the Army Signal Corps.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Luther Cardosi, 83, of West Chester, one of the earliest woman computer programmers at Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s, died Friday, Dec. 27, of heart failure at a hospice. Mrs. Cardosi programmed flight trajectories and was a system analyst in the defense industry at Cape Canaveral and in San Diego. She served on the West Chester Area School District board on and off for 12 years, and was a founding member of the short-lived West Chester Area Tax $avers Association, which sought to save money in the district.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 programmers converged over the weekend at Penn for what was billed as "the biggest university hackathon in the world. " To the public, the word hack may bring up visions of Edward Snowden and digital terrorism. But in the tech world, hack is used as a synonym for build . And "hackathons" are the programmer's version of a slumber party, science fair, and Super Bowl rolled into one. The students spent 48 hours at the Palestra, working in small teams to brainstorm, design, and build an app, website, or hardware product.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: J. Yvonne Norris. SHE DOES: Computing and telecommunications. SHE SUCCEEDS BY: Always maintaining better than average performance. When members of the Philadelphia organization Network of Women in Computer Technology set out to assemble an advisory committee of area women who had made it to the top in their field, they couldn't find a "committee's worth. " Turns out that such women are very rare. However, they did find J. Yvonne Norris, manager of information services for Arco Chemical.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Excerpts from their book continue in Currents every Sunday through Aug. 19.   Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele On his last day on the job, Kevin Flanagan, after clearing out a few personal effects and putting them in boxes in the back of his Ford Ranger, left the building where he'd worked for seven years.
NEWS
December 13, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jere J. Sullivan 3d, 57, of Erdenheim, a nationally known radio personality whom local listeners might best remember as "C. Jonathan Morgan," died Tuesday of heart failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. "He was a consummate pro," said Ed Hurst, the longtime Philadelphia radio and TV host who came to know Mr. Sullivan while working at a local radio station. "He was very competent at whatever he did in broadcasting. " In a business notorious for a range of behavioral styles, Mr. Sullivan stood out, said Gerry Wilkinson, president of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Cornell University sophomores, one a 1990 graduate of Haverford High School, have been indicted by a New York state grand jury on charges accusing them of creating a computer virus that infected computers in the United States, Japan and Great Britain. The indictment, made public Tuesday, alleges that from Feb. 14 to 19 the virus altered or destroyed more than $1,000 worth of programs. The students - Mark Andrew Pilgrim, 19, now of Wayne, and David S. Blumenthal, 20, of Worthington, Ohio - were arrested in February and charged with computer tampering for allegedly launching the virus, embedded in three games, into national computer archives.
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NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Querubin, 83, of Seminole, Fla., a programmer for Radio Corp. of America in the 1960s, died of diseases related to aging Saturday, May 30, at Freedom Square Rehabilitation & Nursing Services there. He lived with his family in Cherry Hill from the 1960s to the late 1980s. Born in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Querubin graduated from La Salle College High School in 1949 and, with a full scholarship, earned a bachelor's degree in English literature at La Salle University in 1953. "He started his own computer systems programming company in the late 1950s, in Philadelphia," daughter Cecile said.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter B. Freas Jr. had a job that took him to public schools throughout New Jersey and, his son Walter B. III said, "he loved that job. " As director of education and outreach for the former New Jersey Network, "if a teacher said, 'I'd like to have a program in Spanish,' he would take that back," to his bosses for consideration. And for his efforts, his son said, Mr. Freas in 1986 and 1992 won awards for "outstanding children's programming" from the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edmund J. Lally 3d, 44, of Oaklyn, a computer network programmer at the Vanguard Group in Malvern and former president of the Oaklyn school board, died of a heart-related ailment Tuesday, Sept. 17, at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees. A native of Norwood, Mr. Lally graduated from Interboro High School in 1987 and from Temple University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1991. He did postbaccalaureate studies at Immaculata University. Mr. Lally specialized in information technology, working first for a Philadelphia law firm and the last 18 years at Vanguard.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 programmers converged over the weekend at Penn for what was billed as "the biggest university hackathon in the world. " To the public, the word hack may bring up visions of Edward Snowden and digital terrorism. But in the tech world, hack is used as a synonym for build . And "hackathons" are the programmer's version of a slumber party, science fair, and Super Bowl rolled into one. The students spent 48 hours at the Palestra, working in small teams to brainstorm, design, and build an app, website, or hardware product.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Excerpts from their book continue in Currents every Sunday through Aug. 19.   Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele On his last day on the job, Kevin Flanagan, after clearing out a few personal effects and putting them in boxes in the back of his Ford Ranger, left the building where he'd worked for seven years.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Carolyn Gale Miles, 64, of Glen Mills, a statistical programmer and social activist, died Thursday, March 31, of pancreatic cancer at home. For six years, Ms. Miles had been principal programmer for Customized Improvement Strategies at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals in Wilmington. Previously, she had been a programmer in epidemiology research at two other pharmaceutical companies and at the University of Pennsylvania. A native of Blue Point, N.Y., Ms. Miles earned a bachelor's degree from Western College in Oxford, Ohio, and a master's in public health from Emory University in Atlanta.
NEWS
July 16, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Rossheim, 85, of Society Hill, a pioneering computer programmer, died of complications from thyroid cancer Monday, July 12, at home. Mr. Rossheim graduated from William Penn Charter School. During World War II he served in the Navy aboard the destroyer John W. Weeks in the Pacific. In November 1945, when his ship was on escort duty in Tokyo Bay, he observed the devastation of Hiroshima while on leave. After his discharge, Mr. Rossheim earned a bachelor's degree from Swarthmore College.
NEWS
May 12, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marlen R. "Mickey" Lavin, 77, of Williamstown, a Women's Army Corps veteran who was a career keypunch operator and then a computer programmer, died of complications from pneumonia Sunday, May 9, at Meadow View Nursing and Respiratory Center. Mrs. Lavin was a third-generation Bell Telephone Co. operator and knew the job well. Her resume impressed an Army recruiter, so at age 20, Mrs. Lavin jumped at the chance of being part of the Women's Army Corps. Stationed in Fort Ritchie, Md., Mrs. Lavin worked as an operator.
NEWS
December 13, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jere J. Sullivan 3d, 57, of Erdenheim, a nationally known radio personality whom local listeners might best remember as "C. Jonathan Morgan," died Tuesday of heart failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. "He was a consummate pro," said Ed Hurst, the longtime Philadelphia radio and TV host who came to know Mr. Sullivan while working at a local radio station. "He was very competent at whatever he did in broadcasting. " In a business notorious for a range of behavioral styles, Mr. Sullivan stood out, said Gerry Wilkinson, president of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia.
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