CollectionsProgrammer
IN THE NEWS

Programmer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jerry Augustus, 83, a retired restaurateur and later a computer programmer for the Philadelphia Water Department, died Sunday, Jan. 31, of complications from a stroke at Philadelphia Nursing Home. A lifelong city resident, Mr. Augustus was the son of Dennis and Lela Dialismas Augustus. He attended Drexel University. As a teenager, he was a member of the choir of St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Active in many Greek life organizations, he was the national president of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Carolyn Gale Miles, 64, of Glen Mills, a statistical programmer and social activist, died Thursday, March 31, of pancreatic cancer at home. For six years, Ms. Miles had been principal programmer for Customized Improvement Strategies at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals in Wilmington. Previously, she had been a programmer in epidemiology research at two other pharmaceutical companies and at the University of Pennsylvania. A native of Blue Point, N.Y., Ms. Miles earned a bachelor's degree from Western College in Oxford, Ohio, and a master's in public health from Emory University in Atlanta.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A network programmer accused of setting off a "computer bomb" in his former company's system, causing the loss of valuable data and millions of dollars in damage, was convicted yesterday on one count of computer sabotage. Authorities have called Timothy A. Lloyd's 10-day trial the nation's first in a computer-sabotage case. Lloyd, 37, the former chief network programmer at Omega Engineering Inc. in Bridgeport, Gloucester County, was tried in U.S. District Court in Newark. He was accused of intentionally causing $10 million in damage to Omega's computers and of stealing $50,000 worth of hardware and software equipment and transporting it across state lines to his home in Wilmington.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Querubin, 83, of Seminole, Fla., a programmer for Radio Corp. of America in the 1960s, died of diseases related to aging Saturday, May 30, at Freedom Square Rehabilitation & Nursing Services there. He lived with his family in Cherry Hill from the 1960s to the late 1980s. Born in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Querubin graduated from La Salle College High School in 1949 and, with a full scholarship, earned a bachelor's degree in English literature at La Salle University in 1953. "He started his own computer systems programming company in the late 1950s, in Philadelphia," daughter Cecile said.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Joseph George Iffrig Jr., 52, formerly of Fountainville in Bucks County, a systems programmer at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Bowie, Md., and a specialist in telemetry, died last Friday while on a walking track at the center. The medical examiner's office in Bowie said the cause of death had not been determined. Mr. Iffrig had worked for Honeywell International and its Bendix Engineering unit as a systems programmer for 27 years. He joined Bendix, which was a subcontractor to NASA and the U.S. space program, after serving in the Army Signal Corps.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Robert J. Magee was proud of his collection of sports teams' caps, even though he never bought one himself. Whether the caps were of hockey or football or baseball teams, "people would buy them for him," daughter Teri Van Fossen said. And whether they were college or high school or minor league teams that his children and friends visited across the country, or his favorite, the Eagles, she said, the caps grew and grew "to well over a hundred. " On Wednesday, June 8, Mr. Magee, 83, of Cape May, a former systems analyst and programmer, died at the Aurora, Colo., home of his daughter, three weeks after emergency surgery.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Shovelution is no revolution, at least not yet. Making a household name of a product assembled in a household's basement is not easy. "I don't approach stores anymore. It's very hard to get a yes," said Howie Rosenshine, inventor of the spring-loaded, ergonomic shovel-handle attachment. The 1,500 that have sold ($29.95 each, two for $54.95), bringing in $50,000 in total revenue since 2012, were largely purchased through www.shovelution.com . Recently, the 57-year-old retired computer programmer from Downingtown hinted at a potentially major development.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Luther Cardosi, 83, of West Chester, one of the earliest woman computer programmers at Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s, died Friday, Dec. 27, of heart failure at a hospice. Mrs. Cardosi programmed flight trajectories and was a system analyst in the defense industry at Cape Canaveral and in San Diego. She served on the West Chester Area School District board on and off for 12 years, and was a founding member of the short-lived West Chester Area Tax $avers Association, which sought to save money in the district.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 programmers converged over the weekend at Penn for what was billed as "the biggest university hackathon in the world. " To the public, the word hack may bring up visions of Edward Snowden and digital terrorism. But in the tech world, hack is used as a synonym for build . And "hackathons" are the programmer's version of a slumber party, science fair, and Super Bowl rolled into one. The students spent 48 hours at the Palestra, working in small teams to brainstorm, design, and build an app, website, or hardware product.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: J. Yvonne Norris. SHE DOES: Computing and telecommunications. SHE SUCCEEDS BY: Always maintaining better than average performance. When members of the Philadelphia organization Network of Women in Computer Technology set out to assemble an advisory committee of area women who had made it to the top in their field, they couldn't find a "committee's worth. " Turns out that such women are very rare. However, they did find J. Yvonne Norris, manager of information services for Arco Chemical.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 18, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Shovelution is no revolution, at least not yet. Making a household name of a product assembled in a household's basement is not easy. "I don't approach stores anymore. It's very hard to get a yes," said Howie Rosenshine, inventor of the spring-loaded, ergonomic shovel-handle attachment. The 1,500 that have sold ($29.95 each, two for $54.95), bringing in $50,000 in total revenue since 2012, were largely purchased through www.shovelution.com . Recently, the 57-year-old retired computer programmer from Downingtown hinted at a potentially major development.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, STAFF WRITER
In the year she turned 39, after helping raise her children, Edith Vernick Bergmann went to an employment agency to help determine her future. "She liked math," a son, Warren, said, so, after she took a test, the person in charge suggested a job in computer programming. "This test was like playing a fun game," Warren said. After she had completed it, she told the tester that "she wanted to do more. " He demurred. "When she came home," her son recalled, "she said, 'I don't know what a computer programmer is, but that's what I want to be.' " On Thursday, Aug. 25, Mrs. Bergmann, 91, a former insurance firm computer analyst, died at the Terraces at Parke Place, an assisted living community in Sewell, where she had lived since 2014.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Robert J. Magee was proud of his collection of sports teams' caps, even though he never bought one himself. Whether the caps were of hockey or football or baseball teams, "people would buy them for him," daughter Teri Van Fossen said. And whether they were college or high school or minor league teams that his children and friends visited across the country, or his favorite, the Eagles, she said, the caps grew and grew "to well over a hundred. " On Wednesday, June 8, Mr. Magee, 83, of Cape May, a former systems analyst and programmer, died at the Aurora, Colo., home of his daughter, three weeks after emergency surgery.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Jerry Augustus, 83, a retired restaurateur and later a computer programmer for the Philadelphia Water Department, died Sunday, Jan. 31, of complications from a stroke at Philadelphia Nursing Home. A lifelong city resident, Mr. Augustus was the son of Dennis and Lela Dialismas Augustus. He attended Drexel University. As a teenager, he was a member of the choir of St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Active in many Greek life organizations, he was the national president of the Greek Orthodox Youth of America.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2015
JPMorgan Chase & Co. is looking for software developers. Lots of them. The giant bank needs not just front-end Silicon Valley-style programmers trained in cutting-edge languages to build smartphone apps, but also meat-and-potatoes Java and .NET developers ready to update the vast, aging enterprise software to cope with exploding data volumes, applications, and attacks. It has a special need in the Philadelphia area because it's gearing up to hire several hundred programmers for its new 1,800-employee Fairfax, Del., tech center over the next year and a half, says Jennifer McDermott , a JPMorgan executive director.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert E. Querubin, 83, of Seminole, Fla., a programmer for Radio Corp. of America in the 1960s, died of diseases related to aging Saturday, May 30, at Freedom Square Rehabilitation & Nursing Services there. He lived with his family in Cherry Hill from the 1960s to the late 1980s. Born in Chestnut Hill, Mr. Querubin graduated from La Salle College High School in 1949 and, with a full scholarship, earned a bachelor's degree in English literature at La Salle University in 1953. "He started his own computer systems programming company in the late 1950s, in Philadelphia," daughter Cecile said.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter B. Freas Jr. had a job that took him to public schools throughout New Jersey and, his son Walter B. III said, "he loved that job. " As director of education and outreach for the former New Jersey Network, "if a teacher said, 'I'd like to have a program in Spanish,' he would take that back," to his bosses for consideration. And for his efforts, his son said, Mr. Freas in 1986 and 1992 won awards for "outstanding children's programming" from the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.
NEWS
January 2, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
June Luther Cardosi, 83, of West Chester, one of the earliest woman computer programmers at Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s, died Friday, Dec. 27, of heart failure at a hospice. Mrs. Cardosi programmed flight trajectories and was a system analyst in the defense industry at Cape Canaveral and in San Diego. She served on the West Chester Area School District board on and off for 12 years, and was a founding member of the short-lived West Chester Area Tax $avers Association, which sought to save money in the district.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edmund J. Lally 3d, 44, of Oaklyn, a computer network programmer at the Vanguard Group in Malvern and former president of the Oaklyn school board, died of a heart-related ailment Tuesday, Sept. 17, at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees. A native of Norwood, Mr. Lally graduated from Interboro High School in 1987 and from Temple University with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1991. He did postbaccalaureate studies at Immaculata University. Mr. Lally specialized in information technology, working first for a Philadelphia law firm and the last 18 years at Vanguard.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 programmers converged over the weekend at Penn for what was billed as "the biggest university hackathon in the world. " To the public, the word hack may bring up visions of Edward Snowden and digital terrorism. But in the tech world, hack is used as a synonym for build . And "hackathons" are the programmer's version of a slumber party, science fair, and Super Bowl rolled into one. The students spent 48 hours at the Palestra, working in small teams to brainstorm, design, and build an app, website, or hardware product.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|