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Prom Queen

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NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Mary Grande
Back in the 1950s, Gloucester Catholic High School had its prom in the gym. Our class spent weeks of fun decorating the gym with the theme of "Stairway to the Stars. " We borrowed a huge ladder from the fire department and wrapped it in aluminum foil, hung silver stars from the ceiling, and placed round tables and chairs throughout the gym. My gown was white and gold net. Because it was strapless, I had to have a small jacket made, since shoulders were not allowed to be shown. I wore a white pearl tiara in my red hair, and much to my surprise I was chosen prom queen.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
At L.A.'s Harrison High School, the setting for "She's All That," there are two kinds of girls: good-looking girls, and good-looking girls pretending to be plain so they can turn into ravishing beauties later on. It's a great place to be a guy. Not only are the girls attractive, they're about 22 years old, and they've been around, judging by the salty language. The young woman (Jodi Lyn O'Keefe) making a run at prom queen declares she's a shoo-in to win the election: "I could win this in fluorescent lighting on the first day of my period in T.J. Maxx," she snarls.
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Super Bowl ads have become soap operas. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson shrugged off aliens and other villains so he could get more milk for his kids at breakfast in a Super Bowl spot for the Milk Processor Education Program. Anheuser-Busch's commercial told the story of a baby Clydesdale growing up and returning to his owner for a heartfelt hug years later. And a Jeep ad portrayed the trials and triumphs of families waiting for their return of family members. The reason for all the drama?
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary F. Farmer, 82, of Roslyn, a former billing supervisor and union official who was active in the community, died Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. "She had been dubbed by local residents as the woman in town . . . who has been Abington's best booster," said her niece, Nancy Funk. Among Miss Farmer's many memberships were the town watch and the Abington Township Democratic Committee, on which she served for many years. She was billing department supervisor and shop steward for her union at Thomas Royal Paper Co. before World War II. After the war, she worked for the former Philco-Ford Corp.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Let's join Beth and Dick, chatting over breakfast recently in their South Jersey home: BETH: Morning, sweetheart. Hey, I've got a good idea. Instead of talking about all the bad news in the news today, let's talk about something easier to swallow with these rock-hard muffins you baked. Did you hear the Miss America Pageant is threatening to leave Atlantic City? That the pageant's board of directors voted yesterday to give the city only one more year to keep Miss America strolling on the Boardwalk?
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In just about any journey through life, there is a pivotal choice and a chance in retrospect to regret the road not taken. For Larry Burrows, it's more a case of a swing not taken. Larry (James Belushi) learns that life really is a pitch when he strikes out in his most important at-bat of the season and costs his high school team the championship. This special K in the statistics becomes a mark of Cain for Larry, who in the ensuing years seems always to be looking glumly at a called third strike in one way or another.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | By Sabrina Walters and Mike Franolich, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Peggy Fay, a Haddon Heights nurse and mother of two, a daily churchgoer and former volunteer at a local hospital and a halfway house, disappeared last week. And no one knows why. Not her best friend, Ellen Barrett of Mickleton, who said that the upbeat, popular and positive-thinking Peggy Fay was in good spirits the last time they chatted. Nothing seemed amiss. Not her niece, Colleen Connelly, 27, manager of the Gloucester City beauty school that Fay's family has owned for four generations.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's a scene at the end of Unforgiven when Clint Eastwood's killer cowboy, William Munny, delivers seven words before pulling the trigger on the sheriff. "I don't deserve this . . . to die like this," says Gene Hackman's Little Bill Daggett, lying on a saloon floor at the receiving end of Munny's gun. "I was building a house. " Munny: "Deserve's got nothing to do with it. " Bang. Debate done. You don't need Bill Munny to learn life isn't fair. Your 401(k) statement is proof enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's time to break out the poodle skirts and saddle shoes, slick back the hair and put on that leather (preferably black) jacket. So there's nothing new about '50s nostalgia. The moldy oldies are everywhere - on the radio, in the clubs and even in the concert halls. But for those who want to wallow on a grand scale in the era that inspired Grease and Fonzie, a three-day bash called "Lost in the '50s" kicks off today at the Sheraton Valley Forge Hotel and Convention Center in King of Prussia.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | By Debbie Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Guest didn't have a date for the "Senior Prom" at Sun Valley High School in Aston. Nor did John Wos. But that didn't stop them - or the 40 others who attended the prom without dates - from having a ball. In typical prom fashion, the "girls," freshly coiffed and neatly made up, had put on their best party dresses and wore carnation corsages while the dapper-looking fellows sported matching boutonnieres on their jackets. But instead of arriving in white stretch limos, as some prom-goers might, most of the guests came in long white vans.
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SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - Super Bowl ads have become soap operas. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson shrugged off aliens and other villains so he could get more milk for his kids at breakfast in a Super Bowl spot for the Milk Processor Education Program. Anheuser-Busch's commercial told the story of a baby Clydesdale growing up and returning to his owner for a heartfelt hug years later. And a Jeep ad portrayed the trials and triumphs of families waiting for their return of family members. The reason for all the drama?
NEWS
July 17, 2012 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stage was packed for opening night of MoorArts' production of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee . But the more than 600 seats in Moorestown High School's auditorium were empty. For the first time in the art organization's 21-year history, audience members became a part of the musical - a few more than others, as volunteer contestants were transformed into unprepared spellers. About 170 seats have been assembled on the auditorium's stage, transformed into a small-town gymnasium.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2009 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's a scene at the end of Unforgiven when Clint Eastwood's killer cowboy, William Munny, delivers seven words before pulling the trigger on the sheriff. "I don't deserve this . . . to die like this," says Gene Hackman's Little Bill Daggett, lying on a saloon floor at the receiving end of Munny's gun. "I was building a house. " Munny: "Deserve's got nothing to do with it. " Bang. Debate done. You don't need Bill Munny to learn life isn't fair. Your 401(k) statement is proof enough.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Mary Grande
Back in the 1950s, Gloucester Catholic High School had its prom in the gym. Our class spent weeks of fun decorating the gym with the theme of "Stairway to the Stars. " We borrowed a huge ladder from the fire department and wrapped it in aluminum foil, hung silver stars from the ceiling, and placed round tables and chairs throughout the gym. My gown was white and gold net. Because it was strapless, I had to have a small jacket made, since shoulders were not allowed to be shown. I wore a white pearl tiara in my red hair, and much to my surprise I was chosen prom queen.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Let's join Beth and Dick, chatting over breakfast recently in their South Jersey home: BETH: Morning, sweetheart. Hey, I've got a good idea. Instead of talking about all the bad news in the news today, let's talk about something easier to swallow with these rock-hard muffins you baked. Did you hear the Miss America Pageant is threatening to leave Atlantic City? That the pageant's board of directors voted yesterday to give the city only one more year to keep Miss America strolling on the Boardwalk?
NEWS
December 16, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary F. Farmer, 82, of Roslyn, a former billing supervisor and union official who was active in the community, died Tuesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. "She had been dubbed by local residents as the woman in town . . . who has been Abington's best booster," said her niece, Nancy Funk. Among Miss Farmer's many memberships were the town watch and the Abington Township Democratic Committee, on which she served for many years. She was billing department supervisor and shop steward for her union at Thomas Royal Paper Co. before World War II. After the war, she worked for the former Philco-Ford Corp.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer The New York Daily News, The New York Post, the Washington Post and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "There's a lot of anti-hirsute prejudice. I mean, name one very hairy person in a position of power, besides Robin Williams. " - MIKE MYERS, divulging the real reason his Dr. Evil character in the "Austin Powers" movies is bald It never hurts to ask. That's the lesson Strawberry Mansion High School student Malcolm Blair reinforced when he scored a celebrity escort for his prom - none other than Lisa "Left Eye" Lopes of...
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
At L.A.'s Harrison High School, the setting for "She's All That," there are two kinds of girls: good-looking girls, and good-looking girls pretending to be plain so they can turn into ravishing beauties later on. It's a great place to be a guy. Not only are the girls attractive, they're about 22 years old, and they've been around, judging by the salty language. The young woman (Jodi Lyn O'Keefe) making a run at prom queen declares she's a shoo-in to win the election: "I could win this in fluorescent lighting on the first day of my period in T.J. Maxx," she snarls.
NEWS
July 5, 1995 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Inch-long purple scars glisten on the front and outside of Brandi Butler's right knee as she battles the resistance cord in the latest exercise in her rehabilitation regimen. Back and forth in a side shuffle, with a bungee-like cord secured to her waist and to a nearby doorknob, Butler struggles to end her nearly 90-minute workout with a smile still firmly fixed on her face. "At times, my spirits are good, and other times, I think about where I would be if this hadn't happened," said Butler, the Cheltenham High basketball star who is recovering from a tear to an anterior cruciate ligament.
NEWS
October 6, 1992 | By Sabrina Walters and Mike Franolich, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Peggy Fay, a Haddon Heights nurse and mother of two, a daily churchgoer and former volunteer at a local hospital and a halfway house, disappeared last week. And no one knows why. Not her best friend, Ellen Barrett of Mickleton, who said that the upbeat, popular and positive-thinking Peggy Fay was in good spirits the last time they chatted. Nothing seemed amiss. Not her niece, Colleen Connelly, 27, manager of the Gloucester City beauty school that Fay's family has owned for four generations.
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