CollectionsProm
IN THE NEWS

Prom

NEWS
May 9, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden High School's senior class trip to Orlando, Fla., was supposed to be a "rewarding experience. " Their principal believed the students deserved the trip because they had been "such a good class. " But when the 81 seniors returned home from the eight-day trip, half of them faced disciplinary measures for behavior problems. And their senior prom was canceled, in a highly unusual move by school officials. "The reputation of Camden High School has been tarnished in Fayetteville, North Carolina [one of the students' stopovers]
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
The girls in long dresses. The boys in tuxes. It was the evening of a young lifetime. Until splashes of blood on the walls, toilet and tiles of a restroom stall turned the Lacey Township, N.J., high school prom into an ugly memory Friday night. Another young woman had given birth and dumped her newborn, this time in a trash can in the bathroom, authorities said. Then, inconceivably, the 19-year-old senior returned to the ballroom floor and her boyfriend's arms and continued dancing.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | By Beth Gillin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Really, it had all the ingredients of a perfect prom: a theme ("Blue Hawaii"); a hot band (the Dukes of Destiny), and scores of happy guests decked out in formal wear (sort of). The People's Prom, a benefit for a school and a refugee-aid project held Saturday night in Germantown, attracted hundreds of guests, many of them aging baby boomers who had skipped their own high school and college proms because, as Nancy O'Donnell, a member of the prom committee put it, "going to a prom then was uncool.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Maria T. Lario
Standing awkwardly, I darted my eyes from the industrial-grade rug to my father's hazel eyes, which I scanned for an answer. While I couldn't discern one, I did see something else in his face, a look of infinite sadness mixed with bravado, that made me turn my own away. I stood there, shifting from one foot to the other while smoothing the front of the pink, dotted swiss prom dress. I preened, pirouetted (badly), and pretended to look at my reflection in the mirror. Secretly, I kept glancing at my dad, who was clearly uncomfortable as the only man shopping in the Fashion Bug in Audubon.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | By Melody McDonald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stan Maslowski slid from behind the counter and quickly maneuvered through dozens of teens who were busy zipping and tugging, discussing and fussing over dresses - a dreamy pink ball gown, the sexy blue beaded number, a short white satin getup. Sure to keep his head down to avoid eye contact with demanding customers, Stan darted up some stairs leading to a private office, plopped down behind a desk and sighed heavily. A stolen moment is nothing more than a treasured minute for the owner of a dress shop during prom season.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All eyes were on Seth Kerrigan yesterday as he sauntered into the prom in a striped gray vest and neatly creased slacks. He made a beeline for the dance floor, turned to his admirers, and then went for the laughs, playfully slapping himself on the forehead. "You can dress him up, but you can't change him," his mom, Chris Kerrigan, said with a chuckle. So went the Pennridge High School Pre-School Prom - an annual event organized by the high school students enrolled in a child development course.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | By Ellen Goodman
My friend drops the newspaper story on my desk with a crisp announcement: "Another 'prom mom.' " It's another New Jersey dateline, another teenage mother, another infant born and gruesomely disposed of in a bathroom. This time the 16-year-old is not at a prom but at a bus terminal on an Atlantic City tour of casinos. What shall we call her: Casino Mom? This time, the baby is not yet dead, and the charges are not yet murder. I have been collecting these stories - about eight in 18 months - with the hope that some sense will emerge from this senselessness.
NEWS
December 19, 1997
Ask anyone who's done it: Guiding a youngster through the middle-school years is no picnic. Heck, just negotiating the daily choice of what to wear can be, well, wearing. Then there's classroom work that's noticeably more challenging, plus a growing list of soccer games, band practices, play rehearsals and the like. (Totally unscientific research concludes that middle-school parents own a disproportionate share of those "Mom's Taxi" bumper stickers for the family minivan.) In this landscape, the decision of one South Jersey middle school to cancel a traditional dance that was getting to look like a prom strikes a blow for sanity.
NEWS
May 7, 2005 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In their dreams, did they dare imagine themselves decked out in formal clothes and fancy hairdos and dancing at the prom? Maybe. Tonight, the mist of imagination will lift and it will all be real. They are teenagers with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and other physical and intellectual disabilities that often push them to the furthest fringes of the high school social scene. At the regionwide Friendship Ball, hosted by Haverford High School, they will share prom-night magic with their escorts and pals: athletes, academic stars, and other "regular-education" peers who volunteer in a program called Best Buddies.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|