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Proof

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
The best things about Dick Francis' books are their familiarity - and their surprises. Consider his latest in paperback, Proof (Fawcett, $4.50.) You figure that there's going to be something about horses and/or horse racing. And you wonder what the surprise will be. The title is a clue (if you're a writer, you'll guess wrong; a drinker, right). The cover spells it out: a bunch of grapes with an automatic lying in the midst of them. Wine seller Tony Beach - well, he sells other spirits as well and even soft drinks - is asked to cater a posh affair for race-horse trainer Jack Hawthorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
* TYRANT. 10 tonight, FX. * PROOF. 10 tonight, TNT. WHAT IF Sonny, not Michael, had been the more interesting Corleone brother? We'll never know how that version of "The Godfather" might have turned out, but FX's "Tyrant" seems ready to explore the idea. The Mideast drama returns for a second season tonight with its Michael equivalent, Barry Al Fayeed (Adam Rayner), imprisoned and awaiting execution for trying to overthrow his older brother Jamal (Ashraf Barhom) in hopes of setting fictional Abbudin on a path to democracy.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
The U.S. Mint has begun accepting mail orders for its 1993 silver proof sets and the Benjamin Franklin Firefighters silver medallion. The silver proof set includes a dime, quarter and half dollar struck in .900 fine silver. It will sell for $18 and be delivered in black packaging. After Sept. 1, the price will go up to $21. The medallion celebrates Franklin as the founder of the first fire company in Philadelphia, and honors firefighters everywhere. It will be available in proof at $33 and in uncirculated condition at $29. After Sept.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Most experts believe movies do not cause violence, but "Proof of Life" could be an exception. I fear that after seeing it, many women will arrange for their husbands to be kidnapped, on the off chance that an insurance company will send a live-in companion and rescue guy who will turn out to be Russell Crowe. This is the fantasy premise of "Proof of Life," and it has considerable appeal, thanks to Crowe's growing popularity as an actor and star. Crowe became a marquee commodity earlier this year with "Gladiator," a movie in which he had to appear with digital lions because the real lions were reportedly afraid to go near him. He's surly, threatening, he's thickly built, he looks like he might smell bad, and yet he's still somehow handsome - all of which sets him apart from dainty boy stars like Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Badlands doesn't look quite so bad now. Yesterday, under a tent in a manicured courtyard off a busy barrio corner, the Hispanic Association of Contractors and Enterprises (HACE) showed off its biggest achievement yet. Villas Del Caribe is the largest Latino housing development in North Philadelphia. Eighty-one three- and four-bedroom town houses were built on a lot that had stood vacant for 20 years at Allegheny Avenue and Mascher Street. The project took 13 years, and help from the state, city and others.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Proof is a play I enjoy more while I'm watching it than afterward, when I'm thinking about it. I felt that way when I saw the Broadway tour of the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama in Philadelphia earlier this year and, even though the plot and characters were familiar, I reacted pretty much the same way to the very sound production now at the Delaware Theatre Company. The principal character of David Auburn's play is Catherine, the 25-year-old daughter of a once-brilliant mathematician at the University of Chicago.
SPORTS
June 3, 2009 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The University of Memphis said it should keep the victories from the 2007-08 season that ended in the national title game after an internal investigation turned up no proof that a former men's basketball player cheated on his SAT exam. A report detailing the school's investigation into NCAA allegations, released to news outlets yesterday under a public-records request, details Memphis' internal probe into accusations that a former player allowed a stand-in to take his SAT. The report also looked into charges of grade-tampering on behalf of the player.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
You don't have to drink General Lee 100 proof whiskey to know that it probably does not spend a lot of time gathering dust on the top shelf. You can tell by the name that, if a pint of The General won't make you surrender your sword, nothing will. By the same token, there is a time and a place for everything. A time for 25-year-old, single-grain whiskey, and a time for old General Lee. So, fans of General Lee 100 proof whiskey, White Tiger wine and Zapata White Tequila, rejoice: Kasser Distillers Products Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Proof has found a perfect venue in the intimate Independence Studio on 3 at the Walnut Street Theatre. This luminous production, directed by Kate Galvin, invites you onto the porch and into the lives of four interesting people. Unlike so many characters in contemporary plays, these interesting people are all kind and all smart - mathematical-wizard smart; nobody is cruel or snide or selfish or violent. Makes a nice change. Another nice change is how coherent and moving the script itself seemed to me in this production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Educators who worry that there aren't enough women in math and science, take comfort that in Proof and Flightplan, both opening today, Gwyneth Paltrow is a mathematician and Jodie Foster an engineer. Like A Beautiful Mind, whose real-life subject may have influenced it, Proof suggests the proximity of math and insanity, subset of the one between genius and madness. Adapted from David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Auburn and Rebecca Miller, the movie unfolds in the Chicago home of Robert (Anthony Hopkins)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
* TYRANT. 10 tonight, FX. * PROOF. 10 tonight, TNT. WHAT IF Sonny, not Michael, had been the more interesting Corleone brother? We'll never know how that version of "The Godfather" might have turned out, but FX's "Tyrant" seems ready to explore the idea. The Mideast drama returns for a second season tonight with its Michael equivalent, Barry Al Fayeed (Adam Rayner), imprisoned and awaiting execution for trying to overthrow his older brother Jamal (Ashraf Barhom) in hopes of setting fictional Abbudin on a path to democracy.
NEWS
June 1, 2015
You'd think Ashton Cigar Bar would be, naturally, mostly about smoke, and, yes, there are 200 cigar labels waiting behind a glass-walled humidor at this sleek oasis of luxury tobacco, totally revamped from the old Mahogany and renamed by its new owners in late 2013. A half-million-dollar purification system, however, has cleared the air for Ashton's other great treasure: whiskey. With more than 350 bottles of Scotch, it's a malthead's paradise. For example, you'll discover rarities such as one of the few Islay malts that isn't about smoke: Bruichladdich 2007 Islay Barley Rockside Farm.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
NEWS
April 10, 2015
WOULD YOU enjoy drinking beer as much if it didn't give you a buzz? Those bitter hops, that toasty malt - do we really need the alcohol to enjoy the flavor of a glass of ale? It turns out, yes, we do. In his new, utterly fascinating book, Tasty: The Art and Science of What We Eat (Scribner), Pulitzer Prize-winning author John McQuaid writes that ethanol - itself essentially flavorless - changes and improves the very chemistry of flavor. First, the process of fermentation produces a host of byproducts that, although not themselves alcoholic, have flavors that are both "complex and provocative.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Marcelle describes himself as an excellent builder, and for proof, he can point to his Lego structures, which he spends many hours happily creating. Like most 12-year-olds, he also likes video games and remote-control cars, and although a bit shy at first, he'll talk avidly on both subjects. He also enjoys reading the Hardy Boys books. Marcelle is enrolled in the seventh grade, and receives special-education services. He does best in small classes with individual attention and positive reinforcement from his teachers.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Lou Franzini is a patient but persistent man. For most of the last year, the 64-year-old retired banker from Exton has been trying to get the Affordable Care Act website to correct his online account to show that he had coverage in 2014. Yet no matter with whom he speaks or what proof he shows, the error remains. Franzini's proof of insurance is pretty solid: a paid hospital bill to the tune of roughly $500,000. That's what he estimates Independence Blue Cross doled out for his cancer care last year, less, of course, his monthly premium and $6,350 maximum out-of-pocket cost.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the nation's first quarantine stations had been transformed into a playground for the wealthy, and the dead buried on the property were no longer welcome. Nobody wanted to play baseball on top of the departed. So, in 1900, the bodies were dug up and moved out. Until last year, the final resting place of the immigrants who sailed to the United States in the 1800s but died at the Lazaretto in Tinicum Township, Delaware County, was the subject of informed speculation. No one was certain until Megan Harris' work.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY DAVID SACK
IN STATES where medical and recreational cannabis sales are allowed, disquieting new trends and statistics are proving its unique dangers for those most vulnerable to its effects: children. One such statistic is a spike in calls to poison-control centers. According to the National Poison Data System, calls about accidental ingestion of marijuana in children age 9 and younger more than tripled in states that decriminalized marijuana before 2005. In states that enacted legalization from 2005 to 2011, calls increased nearly 11.5 percent per year.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
You should have disregarded NBA commissioner Adam Silver's announcing around 7:45 p.m. Thursday that the 76ers were on the clock. They had been on the clock for 364 days, through several hundred hours of scouting followed by several hundred mock drafts and several hundred rumors. After all that, they made what they called an easy choice. Time will tell if Joel Embiid was the right choice; we won't know until he actually starts playing. We'll probably have to wait at least until we see the 7-foot center out of Kansas defending a mobile post player in the 2015-16 season opener before we begin to draw any conclusions.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - A review has found no evidence that then-Attorney General Tom Corbett delayed the investigation into serial sex abuser Jerry Sandusky for political gain, but it raises questions about the pace of the case, according to three people who have read the report. The report also does not fault prosecutors for taking the case to a grand jury, a step that lengthened the investigation and that critics contended kept Sandusky on the streets, the sources said. But the review does flag the timing of certain decisions prosecutors made, such as searching Sandusky's house two years after the investigation began.
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