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Proof

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1986 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
The best things about Dick Francis' books are their familiarity - and their surprises. Consider his latest in paperback, Proof (Fawcett, $4.50.) You figure that there's going to be something about horses and/or horse racing. And you wonder what the surprise will be. The title is a clue (if you're a writer, you'll guess wrong; a drinker, right). The cover spells it out: a bunch of grapes with an automatic lying in the midst of them. Wine seller Tony Beach - well, he sells other spirits as well and even soft drinks - is asked to cater a posh affair for race-horse trainer Jack Hawthorn.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
The U.S. Mint has begun accepting mail orders for its 1993 silver proof sets and the Benjamin Franklin Firefighters silver medallion. The silver proof set includes a dime, quarter and half dollar struck in .900 fine silver. It will sell for $18 and be delivered in black packaging. After Sept. 1, the price will go up to $21. The medallion celebrates Franklin as the founder of the first fire company in Philadelphia, and honors firefighters everywhere. It will be available in proof at $33 and in uncirculated condition at $29. After Sept.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Most experts believe movies do not cause violence, but "Proof of Life" could be an exception. I fear that after seeing it, many women will arrange for their husbands to be kidnapped, on the off chance that an insurance company will send a live-in companion and rescue guy who will turn out to be Russell Crowe. This is the fantasy premise of "Proof of Life," and it has considerable appeal, thanks to Crowe's growing popularity as an actor and star. Crowe became a marquee commodity earlier this year with "Gladiator," a movie in which he had to appear with digital lions because the real lions were reportedly afraid to go near him. He's surly, threatening, he's thickly built, he looks like he might smell bad, and yet he's still somehow handsome - all of which sets him apart from dainty boy stars like Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise.
NEWS
May 1, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
The Badlands doesn't look quite so bad now. Yesterday, under a tent in a manicured courtyard off a busy barrio corner, the Hispanic Association of Contractors and Enterprises (HACE) showed off its biggest achievement yet. Villas Del Caribe is the largest Latino housing development in North Philadelphia. Eighty-one three- and four-bedroom town houses were built on a lot that had stood vacant for 20 years at Allegheny Avenue and Mascher Street. The project took 13 years, and help from the state, city and others.
NEWS
September 30, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Proof is a play I enjoy more while I'm watching it than afterward, when I'm thinking about it. I felt that way when I saw the Broadway tour of the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama in Philadelphia earlier this year and, even though the plot and characters were familiar, I reacted pretty much the same way to the very sound production now at the Delaware Theatre Company. The principal character of David Auburn's play is Catherine, the 25-year-old daughter of a once-brilliant mathematician at the University of Chicago.
SPORTS
June 3, 2009 | Daily News Staff and Wire Reports
The University of Memphis said it should keep the victories from the 2007-08 season that ended in the national title game after an internal investigation turned up no proof that a former men's basketball player cheated on his SAT exam. A report detailing the school's investigation into NCAA allegations, released to news outlets yesterday under a public-records request, details Memphis' internal probe into accusations that a former player allowed a stand-in to take his SAT. The report also looked into charges of grade-tampering on behalf of the player.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
You don't have to drink General Lee 100 proof whiskey to know that it probably does not spend a lot of time gathering dust on the top shelf. You can tell by the name that, if a pint of The General won't make you surrender your sword, nothing will. By the same token, there is a time and a place for everything. A time for 25-year-old, single-grain whiskey, and a time for old General Lee. So, fans of General Lee 100 proof whiskey, White Tiger wine and Zapata White Tequila, rejoice: Kasser Distillers Products Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Proof has found a perfect venue in the intimate Independence Studio on 3 at the Walnut Street Theatre. This luminous production, directed by Kate Galvin, invites you onto the porch and into the lives of four interesting people. Unlike so many characters in contemporary plays, these interesting people are all kind and all smart - mathematical-wizard smart; nobody is cruel or snide or selfish or violent. Makes a nice change. Another nice change is how coherent and moving the script itself seemed to me in this production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2005 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Educators who worry that there aren't enough women in math and science, take comfort that in Proof and Flightplan, both opening today, Gwyneth Paltrow is a mathematician and Jodie Foster an engineer. Like A Beautiful Mind, whose real-life subject may have influenced it, Proof suggests the proximity of math and insanity, subset of the one between genius and madness. Adapted from David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Auburn and Rebecca Miller, the movie unfolds in the Chicago home of Robert (Anthony Hopkins)
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first draft of the new constitution apparently has been written and sent by the Federal Convention's Committee of Detail to the firm of Dunlap & Claypoole for a limited and top-secret printing. A long document in the lacy, slanting handwriting of committee member James Wilson of Pennsylvania is believed to have been delivered yesterday under strict security to Dunlap & Claypoole, the printers of the Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser. The printers, at Second and Market Streets, across from the main market sheds, would be the logical place for the convention's work.
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NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY DAVID SACK
IN STATES where medical and recreational cannabis sales are allowed, disquieting new trends and statistics are proving its unique dangers for those most vulnerable to its effects: children. One such statistic is a spike in calls to poison-control centers. According to the National Poison Data System, calls about accidental ingestion of marijuana in children age 9 and younger more than tripled in states that decriminalized marijuana before 2005. In states that enacted legalization from 2005 to 2011, calls increased nearly 11.5 percent per year.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
You should have disregarded NBA commissioner Adam Silver's announcing around 7:45 p.m. Thursday that the 76ers were on the clock. They had been on the clock for 364 days, through several hundred hours of scouting followed by several hundred mock drafts and several hundred rumors. After all that, they made what they called an easy choice. Time will tell if Joel Embiid was the right choice; we won't know until he actually starts playing. We'll probably have to wait at least until we see the 7-foot center out of Kansas defending a mobile post player in the 2015-16 season opener before we begin to draw any conclusions.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - A review has found no evidence that then-Attorney General Tom Corbett delayed the investigation into serial sex abuser Jerry Sandusky for political gain, but it raises questions about the pace of the case, according to three people who have read the report. The report also does not fault prosecutors for taking the case to a grand jury, a step that lengthened the investigation and that critics contended kept Sandusky on the streets, the sources said. But the review does flag the timing of certain decisions prosecutors made, such as searching Sandusky's house two years after the investigation began.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
LET'S AGREE on two things about the controversial sting on Philadelphia pols. One, we still don't know who's right and who's wrong about how it was handled. Two, in its aftermath, individual and institutional rehab is in order. This is true for state Attorney General Kathleen Kane, whose rising-star reputation got sucked into a black hole from which it remains to be retrieved. It's true for the Legislature; once again tarnished, once again exposed for ethical lethargy and ongoing failures to promote public trust.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
For four years, Ellie D. Brown has been trying to determine whether an early education in the arts enhances children's ability to learn overall, and again and again she has turned to an unlikely tool of inquiry: a small swab of sponge. More than 24,000 times, the West Chester University associate professor of psychology and her colleagues have reached into the mouths of 500 children at Settlement Music School's Kaleidoscope Head Start program and a nearby control school to measure cortisol, the hormone associated with stress levels.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Call it a sweet victory for Big Chocolate. A federal judge ruled Wednesday in favor of the nation's largest candy makers in a price-fixing lawsuit filed by 22 supermarket and drug store chains. U.S. District Judge Christopher C. Conner found that there was no evidence that Hershey Co., Mars Inc., and Nestle U.S.A. colluded to boost prices on candy bars. The class-action suit, brought by chains including Rite Aid, CVS, Safeway, Giant Eagle, and Food Lion, alleged that the chocolate companies - which control 75 percent of the candy market - knowingly engaged in parallel price increases on single-sale candy bars.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey assemblyman leading the Legislature's investigation into the George Washington Bridge scandal voiced skepticism Sunday of a claim by a former Port Authority official that "evidence exists" implicating Gov. Christie in the controversy. If it does, it should be produced, Assemblyman John S. Wisniewski (D., Middlesex), cochair of the Legislature's joint panel investigating the matter, said on CBS's Face the Nation . An attorney for David Wildstein, a former Christie appointee at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, wrote a letter to the agency Friday accusing Christie of lying about when he learned of September lane closures on the bridge.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2012 | By Yuri Kageyama, Associated Press
YOKOHAMA, Japan - Toshiba Corp. has developed a robot it says can withstand high radiation to work in nuclear disasters, but it's not clear what the robot would be able to do if and when it got the go-ahead to enter Japan's crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. The four-legged robot can climb over debris and venture into radiated areas off-limits to humans. One significant innovation, Toshiba said, is that its wireless network can be controlled in high radiation, automatically seeking better transmission when reception becomes weak.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia Cleary never gave up. In the 43 years since her older brother, Marine Cpl. Robert Daniel Corriveau, a decorated Vietnam veteran, went missing from the Philadelphia Naval Hospital and was declared a deserter, she never stopped searching for him. She wrote countless letters, pestered senators and congressmen, traveled from her New Hampshire home to Philadelphia to search news archives, scoured faces in crowds, battled with military and...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2012
SO DOES A TV SHOW that's filmed entirely in Philly look different from one that only pretends it's here? We won't be able to see how we look in our latest closeup until NBC's "Do No Harm" premieres in early 2013. Until then, there's always "Hack," the 2002-04 drama starring Philadelphian David Morse and Andre Braugher ("Last Resort"). Its 40 episodes are now available for streaming on Netflix. Also on Netflix (as well as on Amazon Instant Video): Steven Bochco's "Philly," a legal drama starring Roxborough's Kim Delaney that mostly filmed in southern California, on a set with surprisingly realistic City Hall interiors, including one of its massive staircases.
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