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Property Crimes

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NEWS
May 31, 2001 | By Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of property crimes in Philadelphia was down sharply last year, but murders, rapes and serious assaults all were up, the FBI said yesterday. There were 296 murders reported in the city in 1999 and 319 last year, an 8 percent increase that police blamed on a variety of factors. "Two things happened - the beginning of the year and the end of the year," said Police Commissioner John F. Timoney, referring to a deadly January 2000 drug war in Southwest Philadelphia and the Dec. 28 murders of seven people inside a suspected crack house in the city's Mill Creek section.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early on Nov. 30, 2011, someone threw a rock through a Bristol Township gas station window and hopped inside. The thief made off with 56 packs of Newports, $56 in cash, and $3,200 in instant lottery tickets, according to police. As the burglar climbed back through the shattered window, he cut his palm, leaving a smear of blood on a white calculator. This week, more than 18 months later, Bristol Township police arrested Jimmy Lee Wilson, 54, based partly on the DNA he left behind.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The number of violent crimes reported to police decreased 3.8 percent last year to 1.2 million, the fifth straight year of declines, the FBI announced Monday. Meanwhile, the total number of property crimes reported to law enforcement agencies went down 0.5 percent to 9 million, the ninth consecutive year that figure has fallen. Property crimes resulted in estimated losses of $156.6 billion. The latest declines mark the continuation of a nearly two-decade drop in crime levels - a trend that almost no one in the field of criminology predicted, said Professor John Caulkins of Carnegie Mellon Heinz College.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the map that hangs from Police Capt. Joseph Bologna's office wall, colored tacks represent violent crime in the 19th District, which spans West Philadelphia from Cobbs Creek to West Fairmount Park. On a recent afternoon, tacks were clustered in bunches across the map, which is common. Unusual were the two tacks pinned in Overbrook Park. They marked the deaths of Christopher Malcolm, 17, and Rohan Bennett, 13, brothers shot to death in their parents' home Tuesday in what police say was a bad drug deal - and the type of violent crime that is rare in the mostly working-class neighborhood of red-brick rowhouses and tidy lawns, bordered by the well-heeled townships of Haverford and Lower Merion.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want a rundown on crime in your neighborhood over the last day? Are you a techie who can write code to display a digital map of gun crime in Philadelphia? Are you a scholar who wants to analyze crime trends year after year? All of this is now doable under a public-information initiative rolled out Wednesday by Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey and top information officials of the Nutter administration. Now anyone with a browser can look at maps showing crime in the city over the previous 30 days at http://www.phila.gov/map . The display will update daily.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's prisons chief told lawmakers Monday that a new study shows "shockingly high" rates of offenders being rearrested or jailed again, but said his department was employing an array of strategies to address the problem. Corrections Secretary John Wetzel, speaking at a Senate Budget Committee hearing, said two-thirds of state inmates are either arrested again or sent back to prison after being released. Philadelphia, along with Delaware and Montgomery Counties, has the highest rate of arrests of the 67 counties, but it is not in the top 10 counties for the number of released inmates sent back to prison, according to the study by Wetzel's department.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | By Jere Downs and Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer correspondent Christine Bahls and staff writer Craig R. McCoy contributed to this article, which also contains information from the Associated Press
Overall crime fell slightly in Pennsylvania last year even as the number of murders, rapes and arsons rose, according to statistics released yesterday by the state police. The 1.5 percent decline in the state reflects the downward trend in crime across the country over the last five years. In Pennsylvania, the number of violent crimes declined by about 8 percent while property crimes fell by nearly 5 percent. The biggest drops were in robbery, down 15.8 percent, and motor-vehicle thefts, which fell 9.4 percent.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | By Walter E. Williams
The Federal Bureau of Investigation released its 1995 preliminary crime statistics earlier this month. Nationally, serious crime dropped by 2 percent. The violent crime category showing the steepest decline, 8 percent, was murder. Decreases in other violent offenses were 7 percent for robbery, 6 percent for forcible rape and 3 percent for assault. Property crimes were down, too: Car theft and burglary were down 6 percent and 5 percent respectively. For decades now, we've listened to judges, social workers and psychobabblers who've counseled us that the way to deal with crime is to find the original causes of crime and then have government programs to eliminate those causes.
NEWS
September 4, 1990
Word that the city's prison population has never been greater may come as good news to inmates eager to get back on city street corners, but it's bad news for Philadelphia as a whole. Whether prison overcrowding is relieved by the early release of felons nearing the end of their minimum sentences or by bailing out more people arrested for nonviolent, property crimes, you can bet the net result won't be an improvement in the quality of city life. Philadelphia's already at the point that most nonviolent crime has been decriminalized - the three car thefts every hour, the 140 daily larcenies.
NEWS
May 2, 1994 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Murders edged up and property crimes dropped slightly, leaving last year's crime toll pretty much unchanged from the year before - but still plenty bad, the FBI reported yesterday. Those who will make America's next crime wave are in their mid-teens. In the coming years, experts fear, the nation will see an era of well-armed young savages who kill without mercy for a few dollars or a cross look. "This is the lull before the crime storm that we're going to have in this country the next decade," declared Jack Levin, professor of sociology and criminology at Northeastern University in Boston.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early on Nov. 30, 2011, someone threw a rock through a Bristol Township gas station window and hopped inside. The thief made off with 56 packs of Newports, $56 in cash, and $3,200 in instant lottery tickets, according to police. As the burglar climbed back through the shattered window, he cut his palm, leaving a smear of blood on a white calculator. This week, more than 18 months later, Bristol Township police arrested Jimmy Lee Wilson, 54, based partly on the DNA he left behind.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's prisons chief told lawmakers Monday that a new study shows "shockingly high" rates of offenders being rearrested or jailed again, but said his department was employing an array of strategies to address the problem. Corrections Secretary John Wetzel, speaking at a Senate Budget Committee hearing, said two-thirds of state inmates are either arrested again or sent back to prison after being released. Philadelphia, along with Delaware and Montgomery Counties, has the highest rate of arrests of the 67 counties, but it is not in the top 10 counties for the number of released inmates sent back to prison, according to the study by Wetzel's department.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want a rundown on crime in your neighborhood over the last day? Are you a techie who can write code to display a digital map of gun crime in Philadelphia? Are you a scholar who wants to analyze crime trends year after year? All of this is now doable under a public-information initiative rolled out Wednesday by Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey and top information officials of the Nutter administration. Now anyone with a browser can look at maps showing crime in the city over the previous 30 days at http://www.phila.gov/map . The display will update daily.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The number of violent crimes reported to police decreased 3.8 percent last year to 1.2 million, the fifth straight year of declines, the FBI announced Monday. Meanwhile, the total number of property crimes reported to law enforcement agencies went down 0.5 percent to 9 million, the ninth consecutive year that figure has fallen. Property crimes resulted in estimated losses of $156.6 billion. The latest declines mark the continuation of a nearly two-decade drop in crime levels - a trend that almost no one in the field of criminology predicted, said Professor John Caulkins of Carnegie Mellon Heinz College.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
WASHINGTON - Violent crimes unexpectedly jumped 18 percent last year, the first rise in nearly 20 years, and property crimes rose for first time in a decade. But academic experts said the new government data fall short of signaling a reversal of the long decline in crime. The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reported Wednesday that the increase in the number of violent crimes was the result of an upward swing in simple assaults, which rose 22 percent, from 4 million in 2010 to 5 million last year.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By Pete Yost, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Violent crimes unexpectedly jumped 18 percent last year, the first rise in nearly 20 years, and property crimes rose for first time in a decade. But academic experts said the new government data fall short of signaling a reversal of the long decline in crime. The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reported Wednesday that the increase in the number of violent crimes was the result of an upward swing in simple assaults, which rose 22 percent, from four million in 2010 to five million last year.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the map that hangs from Police Capt. Joseph Bologna's office wall, colored tacks represent violent crime in the 19th District, which spans West Philadelphia from Cobbs Creek to West Fairmount Park. On a recent afternoon, tacks were clustered in bunches across the map, which is common. Unusual were the two tacks pinned in Overbrook Park. They marked the deaths of Christopher Malcolm, 17, and Rohan Bennett, 13, brothers shot to death in their parents' home Tuesday in what police say was a bad drug deal - and the type of violent crime that is rare in the mostly working-class neighborhood of red-brick rowhouses and tidy lawns, bordered by the well-heeled townships of Haverford and Lower Merion.
NEWS
January 6, 2010 | By Allison Steele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia saw across-the-board decreases in major crimes over the last two years, authorities announced yesterday, including a 22 percent drop in homicides. "These are, of course, spectacular achievements," Mayor Nutter said yesterday at a news conference held at the 22d Police District. "And we will celebrate them for about a second. Our work is not done. We cannot rest. We must be a safer city. " Flanked by Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, newly sworn-in District Attorney Seth Williams, and other law enforcement authorities, Nutter said the Police Department and Ramsey were to be praised for the progress made in reducing crime.
NEWS
December 13, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy and Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Outgoing Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham vigorously disputes the use of conviction figures to judge her performance. She says every case is vitally important to the victim - and thus to her prosecutors. In a 90-minute interview last week, the D.A. was dismissive of The Inquirer's statistical analysis of criminal case outcomes. "You can make those numbers say anything you want," she said. "Here's how I judge: Every day, this group of people and every person in this office gets up to work ready to serve the public, in an honest, uncompromising fashion.
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