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NEWS
February 24, 2006
RE THE MUSLIM shrine versus the cartoons: A large explosion heavily damaged the golden dome of one of Iraq's most famous Muslim Shiite religious shrines in Samarra on Feb. 22. So can someone from the Muslim society please explain how the destruction of such a famous house of worship is less of a concern to the Muslims than a cartoon of the prophet? I'm confused. Larry Lueder Mantua, N.J.
NEWS
October 13, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sheila Audet would see the face in the window of the train as she traveled to New York City. The disembodied visage, with deep-set eyes and light mustache, was not the reflection of anyone seated nearby, and it resembled no one she knew. Audet had left a career as a theater director and choreographer for what she describes as "esoteric stuff - astrology and things. " And as it turned out, the mysterious face in the window was a harbinger of her return to theater, through involvement with a production to run tomorrow through Sunday at the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theater.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran is a book of preachments contained within the barest outline of a story. It would seem to be most unlikely material for a musical, and the show now at the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theater proves that it is indeed not the stuff of musicals. That is if you define a musical as a show with a book, characters and song and dance numbers that move the action and story along. The musical The Prophet has no book, and it has no characters. It is, rather, a series of self-contained scenes based on the prophet's preachings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1986 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Prophet" at the Harold Prince Theater at the Annenberg Center, 3680 Walnut St. through Sunday. A number of recent musicals have succeeded by tugging on the fond memories that Baby Boomers have for their adolescent years. These walks down memory lane include "Grease," the off-Broadway show "Beehive" and, in a different vein, the current local hit, "Nunsense. " "The Prophet," the new musical that opened last night at the Annenberg Center's Harold Prince Theater, reaches out to those same memories.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prophet 21 Inc., a Yardley business-software company, said yesterday it agreed to be acquired by two private equity firms for about $70 million in cash. The deal will make Prophet 21, which became a publicly traded company in 1994, private again. "We feel that Prophet 21 will be a much stronger entity in today's environment," Chuck Boyle, the company's president and chief executive, said yesterday. As a company with a relatively few shares outstanding and a small stock-market value, he said, it has not been followed or appreciated by analysts and investors.
SPORTS
August 15, 1988 | By RICH BRADLEY and LINN WASHINGTON, Daily News Staff Writers
A boxer with "the potential to be the puncher Philadelphia has been looking for for years" was killed early Saturday morning, the result of a hit-and-run accident. Andre "Thee" Prophet, 20, and a female companion, Tres Kelly, 18, were killed when the motorcycle they were riding was struck by a hit-and-run driver at 22nd and York streets, in North Philadelphia, shortly after 5 a.m. Both Prophet and Kelly were pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Prophet, who lived with his mother in the 2400 block of North Colorado Street, a few blocks from the scene of the accident, was considered by many to be a star on the rise.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Mansur Mirovalev, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A self-proclaimed prophet had a vision from God: He would build an Islamic caliphate under the earth. The digging began about a decade ago, and 70 followers soon moved into an eight-level subterranean honeycomb of cramped cells with no light, heat, or ventilation. Children were born. They, too, lived in the cold underground cells for many years - until authorities raided the compound last week and freed the 27 sons and daughters of the sect. Ages 1 to 17, the children rarely saw the light of day and had never left the property, attended school, or been seen by a doctor, officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
February 19, 2008 | By Chris Satullo
Jim Wallis is a prophet rapidly gaining honor in his own land. His new book, The Great Awakening, just hit the New York Times best-seller list. Jon Stewart fawns over him. On his book tour, Wallis speaks to large, rapt audiences, as he did last week at the Episcopal Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in Chestnut Hill. Wallis, a founder of the Sojourners revival movement, seeks to be a prophet in the biblical sense - a man driven to proclaim the hard truths that God has branded on his heart to a skeptical people in a stubborn time.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2005 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yardley software-maker Prophet 21 Inc. said yesterday it was being acquired by Activant Solutions Inc., an Austin, Texas-based business-to-business software firm, for $215 million. Prophet 21 makes e-commerce software for distributors in industries including ones dealing in fasteners, electrical, medical and plumbing. It employs about 530, two-thirds of them in Yardley. The firm is on pace to do $85 million in sales this year, Prophet 21 chief executive officer Chuck Boyle said.
SPORTS
March 16, 1988 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, Daily News Sports Writer
Making his debut as a main-event fighter, Germantown cruiserweight Nate "Mr. " Miller escaped the clutch-and-grab tactics of Ricardo Spain long enough to score a fifth-round technical knockout in the co-featured bout last night at the Blue Horizon. In the other co-feature, light-heavyweight Andre "Thee" Prophet, a senior at Simon Gratz High, remained undefeated with a unanimous eight-round decision over fellow North Philadelphian William Morris. Miller (10-0, 9 knockouts), who is 28th in the latest World Boxing Council ratings, had met Spain before, and won a six-round decision in 1987 in the only fight of Miller's career to go the distance.
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NEWS
December 18, 2013
ONE OF THE longest stories ever told is the story of tax reform in this city. Few disagree about the need to overhaul antiquated tax structures that punish growth, but finding consensus on how to change is more complicated. Changing the property-tax structure, for example, which finally resulted in the Actual Value Initiative, took more than a decade. Business-tax reform is no exception, but it looks as if there may be progress there - if a bill co-sponsored by Council members Bill Green and Maria Quinones-Sanchez advances when Council returns next year.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | BY BECKY BATCHA, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
IT'S NOT UNUSUAL to find a doctor in the house during Friday services at the Zubaida Foundation mosque in Lower Makefield - or several doctors. "We have two heart surgeons, for example," said mosque administrator Mohammed Husain. The largely professional, mostly second-generation immigrants who worship at the Bucks County mosque tend to be accomplished people. That's why America opened its doors in the first place to the Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi families who are the core of the congregation (now joined by some with roots in the Middle East and South Africa, along with American-born Muslims)
NEWS
December 25, 2012
By Sister Mary Scullion and Arthur Waskow Forty-four years ago, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was killed. Forty years ago, his close friend and prophetic partner, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, died. In biblical tradition, "40" is a ripe number, suggesting a pregnant pause before a major transformation - Moses and the Israelites wandering 40 years in the desert, Jesus' 40 days of temptation. What do we learn from their teachings, a generation since their deaths? The two of them were, in their day, an odd couple.
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Rhythm and blues singer Billy Scott has died in North Carolina at age 70. Scott died Saturday of pancreatic and liver cancer at his home in Charlotte, said Bill Kopald with the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame. Scott, who was born Peter Pendleton in Huntington, W. Va., sang with various groups while in the Army. After he was discharged in 1964, he changed his name, and with his wife, Barbara, in 1966 began recording as The Prophets. Their first gold record was 1968's "I Got the Fever.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece - Greek riot police used tear gas and pepper spray to disperse Muslim protesters who clashed with officers Sunday during a rally against a film produced in the United States that denigrates Islam's Prophet Muhammad. No injuries were reported. A general strike in Bangladesh shut down schools, transportation and businesses, while a few hundred people peacefully marched in Pakistan. Iranian students burned flags in Tehran to protest the recent publication of lewd caricatures of Muhammad by a French satirical weekly.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Mansur Mirovalev, Associated Press
MOSCOW - A self-proclaimed prophet had a vision from God: He would build an Islamic caliphate under the earth. The digging began about a decade ago, and 70 followers soon moved into an eight-level subterranean honeycomb of cramped cells with no light, heat, or ventilation. Children were born. They, too, lived in the cold underground cells for many years - until authorities raided the compound last week and freed the 27 sons and daughters of the sect. Ages 1 to 17, the children rarely saw the light of day and had never left the property, attended school, or been seen by a doctor, officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Brian Howard and FOR THE INQUIRER
‘This song is about the Mitchell brothers, who were like Cain and Abel if they'd gone into the strip-club business," Chuck Prophet quipped Thursday night at World Cafe Live before leading his Bay Area band, the Mission Express, into the excellent "The Left Hand and the Right Hand. "   The song was inspired by notorious San Francisco entrepreneurs Jim and Artie Mitchell, whose O'Farrell Theater was once dubbed by Hunter S. Thompson "the Carnegie Hall of public sex in America," and who split up when Jim went to prison for killing Artie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Going by its title, you might think Rock Prophecies had something to do with Nostradamus' predicting the rise of the Jonas Brothers, or some similarly uncanny feat of seeing into the musical, or geological, future. That's not the case. Instead, the poorly chosen title of John Chester's documentary about Robert Knight is meant to imply that the music photographer's ability to home in on young talent destined for greatness qualifies him as some sort of rock prophet. Which is a reach, to put it mildly.
NEWS
April 3, 2008 | By Sean Patrick O'Rourke and Ron Manuto
Some words still echo where they were spoken. At Mason Temple in Memphis, Tenn., the echo is strong - that's where, 40 years ago today, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his last speech. He was in Memphis for the sanitation workers' strike, but he was not meant to speak that night. Ralph Abernathy, whom King described as "the best friend that I have in the world," had begun to speak. But he recognized immediately that it was not his crowd and called for Martin. King was exhausted.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people mellow with age. Others grow more passionate. If the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr.'s weekly sermons seem overly zealous, Barak Obama's outspoken minister has earned his outrage over decades of social injustice, a longtime friend said yesterday. "I look at Rev. White as controversial but prophetic," the Rev. G. Daniel Jones said. "He is informed and he informs. He is a religious analyst coming out of the biblical tradition who denounces social ills and warns people on how to become more just and more humane.
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