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Prosecution

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NEWS
April 17, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Admitted cocaine supplier Earl Stewart couldn't make a cent on the drug, losing $2,000 on every kilo, or 2.2 pounds, he sold to the Junior Black Mafia. William Mead, who arranged drug deals with the JBM, has a history of cooperation with authorities in drug cases in several locations around the country. Otis Weekly, who tape-recorded four cocaine buys under FBI direction, was running a crack-cocaine house at the same time he was working with the bureau. They are three of the government informants who recorded conversations with members of the Junior Black Mafia on the $26 million annual cocaine business the three defendants are accused of operating, in a six-year murder-drug conspiracy.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
When Jenkintown's Salem Baptist Church found itself on the wrong end of a legal dispute with a contractor, it turned to a higher power: the district attorney. Montgomery County authorities appear to have been all too eager to intercede. They eventually charged, arrested, and publicly denounced the contractor, Walter Logan - despite a lack of evidence that he did anything wrong. Court documents suggest the most generous possible understanding of the prosecution is that it grew out of rank incompetence within the District Attorney's Office.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
RE "Flash Mob or Just Rowdy Teenagers": The issue with the recent Center City rampaging youth isn't so much whether their behavior emanates from a spontaneous decision or was planned in advance, via a Web site. The issue, as revealed by one of them in an interview after the Feb. 16 melee at the Gallery and Macy's, is the mind-set of the perpetrators that such behavior is acceptable. The answer is prosecution and front-page display of sentences, such as obligatory community service.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By GEORGE ANASTASIA, Inquirer Staff Writer
JESSICA KISBY was the star witness in the Taj Mahal kidnapping-murder case that concluded Thursday, but she clearly was not a favorite of even the prosecution. In closing arguments before an Atlantic County jury, First Assistant County Prosecutor James McClain described Kisby, 26, as a "cold-blooded murderer. " In a dramatic summation that capped the 10-day trial, McClain told the jury, "At the time she testified, she was one of two coldhearted, cold-blooded murderers in the courtroom . . . . The other was . . . Craig Arno.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham's decision to prosecute a man a second time for a crime he committed 41 years ago won't somehow extract some last measure of justice from a tragic case. William J. Barnes, 71, already has served 20 years in prison for shooting Philadelphia police officer Walter T. Barclay during a burglary in 1966. Barnes inflicted grievous injuries on Barclay, shooting him through a lung and paralyzing him from the waist down. Barclay survived those wounds. That is, he survived until Aug. 19. Barclay, who was 23 at the time of the shooting, died at age 64. A coroner said Barclay died of a heart attack brought on by a severe urinary-tract infection.
SPORTS
February 5, 1992 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
The prosecution rested its case yesterday in the Mike Tyson rape trial with an emotional one-two: the tape recording of a 911 telephone call made by the alleged victim, and some tearful testimony from her mother. The defense then began its case with a series of witnesses who continued to work around the edges of the case's key issues. And on a day when nothing seemed to go right for the defense before Judge Patricia Gifford, there was one victory. The fourth count of the indictment against Tyson, for confinement, was dropped.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prosecution in the federal racketeering trial of six former Philadelphia police narcotics officers rested its case yesterday - an important milestone in a hard-fought trial that began in early January and is finally winding down. Senior U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum sent the jury home after a five- minute court session during which Assistant U.S. Attorney John P. Pucci moved one last group of documents into evidence and said, "The government has no further evidence to present.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Glen Mills man, accused of killing two McDonald's employees last month, probably is exaggerating symptoms of mental illness to avoid trial, a psychologist hired by the Chester County prosecutor testified in court yesterday. Psychologist Gerald Cook said during a competency hearing in Chester County Court that he found that Robert B. Hughes, 21, exhibits contradictory signs of depression. While Hughes appeared mentally withdrawn and often kept his head lowered during trial proceedings, Cook said, he behaved normally in a recent psychological examination at Chester County Prison.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal and New Jersey law enforcement officials say Camden County Sheriff William J. Simon probably will not be prosecuted for his acceptance of $500 in cash from the Roofers Union - a payment prosecutors termed a bribe and Simon has called a Christmas gift. The federal racketeering charges on which Roofers business manager Stephen J. Traitz Jr. and organizer James Nuzzi were convicted last month in Philadelphia included a payment of five $100 bills to Simon at a Teamsters Union hall in Collingswood on Jan. 1, 1986.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry M. Waters was once just another popular high school kid in this pretty seaside town - a wrestling, baseball and football star who saw himself headed to college on an athletic scholarship. About five years ago, when he was 16, he found out that he had contracted the AIDS virus. "I didn't believe it," he said. "It was devastating to me because everything was taken from me. " For years, Waters admits, he lived in a world of lies and denial - denial that proved dangerous to those around him. In 1989, Crystal Harrell, Waters' longtime girlfriend, also tested positive for the AIDS virus.
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NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
He is a self-described dirty cop with a suicide attempt in his past and a history of poor job performance, emotional instability, and lying under oath. The question now before for a jury is: Can anything former Philadelphia Police Officer Jeffrey Walker says be believed? Walker - the government's star witness in the federal corruption trial of six of his former narcotics squad colleagues - finished his testimony Thursday after three grueling days on the stand. By the end, the 46-year-old was clearly exhausted, his shoulders slumped and his head in his hands.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Philadelphia have nearly doubled their use of the sparingly used prosecutorial discretion to close deportation cases this year, a new study shows. The trend, which grants relief from deportation to a larger pool of undocumented immigrants, won praise from some local immigration lawyers, and concern that it could end abruptly if President Obama's executive actions on immigration are nullified in the hotly contested federal court challenge playing out in Texas.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all accounts, it was an accident. Cpl. Richard Schroeter had led countless classes in his 12 years as a Pennsylvania State Police firearms instructor. He had taught the same class several times that week, always carefully unloading his weapon and following "the four cardinal rules of firearms safety," according to Montgomery County grand jury testimony. But on Sept. 30, Schroeter told investigators, he "did not perform a safety check of his Sig Sauer" pistol. When he squeezed the trigger, the five troopers sitting around a conference table "saw a flash, heard a sound, and saw Trooper Kedra jump," the grand jury wrote.
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A part-time toll collector at the Walt Whitman Bridge is suspected of stealing $3,200 this month, but he may not be prosecuted. Since the money will be repaid by the agency that hires part-time collectors, officials of the Delaware River Port Authority said they had not decided whether to seek the arrest and prosecution of the Philadelphia man suspected of stealing the money. "It appears a theft of that magnitude has occurred," DRPA chief executive John Hanson said Thursday. "No decision has been made about prosecuting.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one point during his fraud trial last week, Don Tollefson wanted to testify about a Skittles-eating contest. The prosecutor objected. The judge sent the jury out of the courtroom. For nearly an hour, the former sportscaster delved into yet another tale about his charity for poor children. Tollefson, who is serving as his own attorney, told a story to the judge that involved kids from his charity catching Skittles in their mouths. Out of nowhere, Tollefson said, one boy spoke a few words and expressed a desire to play professional hockey some day. "It's one of the moments I'll cherish for the rest of my life," he said.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors ended their case Monday in the racketeering conspiracy trial of Ironworkers Union boss Joseph Dougherty with another Local 401 business agent testifying that Dougherty clearly approved of vandalizing nonunion job sites. Sean O'Donnell, who comes from a family of union ironworkers, testified that no business agents sought Dougherty's approval before embarking on "night work" - union code for after-dark attacks on nonunion construction sites - because permission wasn't needed.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prosecution in Don Tollefson's fraud trial rested its case Friday afternoon after scores of people testified that he had ripped them off through a sports ticket-selling scheme. The former Philadelphia sportscaster is already facing hurdles as he mounts his defense, which is expected to start Monday. Tollefson, who is representing himself, told a Bucks County Court judge on Friday that he could not afford the nearly $90 he will need to subpoena 25 of his witnesses. Those witnesses, who apparently have not agreed to willingly testify, include Howie Roseman, executive vice president of the Eagles.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The truth can be bent, obscured, or even, to use Attorney General Kathleen Kane's felicitous phrase, "half-assed. " But Kane's assessment of the case against five Democratic officials from Philadelphia could not have been more plainly untrue. In March, when The Inquirer revealed that Kane had aborted an investigation that caught the officials taking money and jewelry from an informant, the state's top law enforcer flatly declared the matter unprosecutable. Nine months later, however, it's being prosecuted.
NEWS
December 18, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Seth Williams yesterday charged Philadelphia-area state representatives Ron Waters and Vanessa Lowery Brown with bribery, criminal conspiracy and conflict of interest in connection to a grand jury probe into legislators taking envelopes full of cash in exchange for political promises. Waters and Brown, both Democrats, were subjects of a grand jury investigation into the political dealings of various Pennsylvania elected officials that has already taken down some, including Sen. LeAnna Washington and former Philadelphia Traffic Court Judge Thomasine Tynes.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vickson and Lorpu Korlewala are out of trouble - at least for now. The Liberian couple was arrested in April and charged with swindling two elderly women out of their life savings. Jailed and bailed, the Korlewalas had to surrender their passports pending trial. On Monday, Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Charles Hayden ordered their passports returned after their charges were dismissed for lack of prosecution. "They had the wrong people. They should have known that from the start," Vickson Korlewala said Wednesday ahead of a planned gathering to thank their defenders for financial and moral support, "and their prayers.
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