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Prosecution

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NEWS
April 17, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Admitted cocaine supplier Earl Stewart couldn't make a cent on the drug, losing $2,000 on every kilo, or 2.2 pounds, he sold to the Junior Black Mafia. William Mead, who arranged drug deals with the JBM, has a history of cooperation with authorities in drug cases in several locations around the country. Otis Weekly, who tape-recorded four cocaine buys under FBI direction, was running a crack-cocaine house at the same time he was working with the bureau. They are three of the government informants who recorded conversations with members of the Junior Black Mafia on the $26 million annual cocaine business the three defendants are accused of operating, in a six-year murder-drug conspiracy.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
When Jenkintown's Salem Baptist Church found itself on the wrong end of a legal dispute with a contractor, it turned to a higher power: the district attorney. Montgomery County authorities appear to have been all too eager to intercede. They eventually charged, arrested, and publicly denounced the contractor, Walter Logan - despite a lack of evidence that he did anything wrong. Court documents suggest the most generous possible understanding of the prosecution is that it grew out of rank incompetence within the District Attorney's Office.
NEWS
March 9, 2010
RE "Flash Mob or Just Rowdy Teenagers": The issue with the recent Center City rampaging youth isn't so much whether their behavior emanates from a spontaneous decision or was planned in advance, via a Web site. The issue, as revealed by one of them in an interview after the Feb. 16 melee at the Gallery and Macy's, is the mind-set of the perpetrators that such behavior is acceptable. The answer is prosecution and front-page display of sentences, such as obligatory community service.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By GEORGE ANASTASIA, Inquirer Staff Writer
JESSICA KISBY was the star witness in the Taj Mahal kidnapping-murder case that concluded Thursday, but she clearly was not a favorite of even the prosecution. In closing arguments before an Atlantic County jury, First Assistant County Prosecutor James McClain described Kisby, 26, as a "cold-blooded murderer. " In a dramatic summation that capped the 10-day trial, McClain told the jury, "At the time she testified, she was one of two coldhearted, cold-blooded murderers in the courtroom . . . . The other was . . . Craig Arno.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham's decision to prosecute a man a second time for a crime he committed 41 years ago won't somehow extract some last measure of justice from a tragic case. William J. Barnes, 71, already has served 20 years in prison for shooting Philadelphia police officer Walter T. Barclay during a burglary in 1966. Barnes inflicted grievous injuries on Barclay, shooting him through a lung and paralyzing him from the waist down. Barclay survived those wounds. That is, he survived until Aug. 19. Barclay, who was 23 at the time of the shooting, died at age 64. A coroner said Barclay died of a heart attack brought on by a severe urinary-tract infection.
SPORTS
February 5, 1992 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
The prosecution rested its case yesterday in the Mike Tyson rape trial with an emotional one-two: the tape recording of a 911 telephone call made by the alleged victim, and some tearful testimony from her mother. The defense then began its case with a series of witnesses who continued to work around the edges of the case's key issues. And on a day when nothing seemed to go right for the defense before Judge Patricia Gifford, there was one victory. The fourth count of the indictment against Tyson, for confinement, was dropped.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prosecution in the federal racketeering trial of six former Philadelphia police narcotics officers rested its case yesterday - an important milestone in a hard-fought trial that began in early January and is finally winding down. Senior U.S. District Judge John B. Hannum sent the jury home after a five- minute court session during which Assistant U.S. Attorney John P. Pucci moved one last group of documents into evidence and said, "The government has no further evidence to present.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Glen Mills man, accused of killing two McDonald's employees last month, probably is exaggerating symptoms of mental illness to avoid trial, a psychologist hired by the Chester County prosecutor testified in court yesterday. Psychologist Gerald Cook said during a competency hearing in Chester County Court that he found that Robert B. Hughes, 21, exhibits contradictory signs of depression. While Hughes appeared mentally withdrawn and often kept his head lowered during trial proceedings, Cook said, he behaved normally in a recent psychological examination at Chester County Prison.
NEWS
December 8, 1987 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal and New Jersey law enforcement officials say Camden County Sheriff William J. Simon probably will not be prosecuted for his acceptance of $500 in cash from the Roofers Union - a payment prosecutors termed a bribe and Simon has called a Christmas gift. The federal racketeering charges on which Roofers business manager Stephen J. Traitz Jr. and organizer James Nuzzi were convicted last month in Philadelphia included a payment of five $100 bills to Simon at a Teamsters Union hall in Collingswood on Jan. 1, 1986.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | By Julia M. Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry M. Waters was once just another popular high school kid in this pretty seaside town - a wrestling, baseball and football star who saw himself headed to college on an athletic scholarship. About five years ago, when he was 16, he found out that he had contracted the AIDS virus. "I didn't believe it," he said. "It was devastating to me because everything was taken from me. " For years, Waters admits, he lived in a world of lies and denial - denial that proved dangerous to those around him. In 1989, Crystal Harrell, Waters' longtime girlfriend, also tested positive for the AIDS virus.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso and Robert Moran, STAFF WRITERS
After initially declining to take on the case, the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office on Wednesday charged a Delaware County man with the indecent assault of a fellow delegate at the Democratic National Convention. Walter Weeks, 74, of Garnet Valley, turned himself in to the police Special Victims Unit around 4 p.m. Wednesday. He was charged with a second-degree misdemeanor of indecent assault. His accuser, Gwen Snyder, contended that Philadelphia authorities had been dismissive of her claim.
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | Barbara Mancini
Barbara ManciniĀ is a Philadelphia nurse and a consultant for Compassion and Choices, an end-of-life advocacy organization Former Attorney General Kathleen Kane has had her day in court. This is somewhat unusual as the overwhelming majority of criminal cases in the United States - up to 97 percent - are settled behind closed doors in the plea-bargaining process. There, prosecutors alone, with no judicial oversight, have the power to determine a person's fate. In 2013, I was falsely accused and prosecuted by Kane on the charge of aiding the attempted suicide of my dying 93-year-old father.
NEWS
August 18, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
A day after the trial judge in the prosecution of Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane warned against any retaliation against witnesses, her top deputy - the incoming acting attorney general - said he was pondering arresting a key witness against her who had an immunity deal. Bruce L. Castor Jr., who takes over the agency after Kane's resignation takes effect Wednesday, stopped short of saying he would charge Joshua Morrow, who admitted on the witness stand that he lied repeatedly in grand jury testimony "to protect Kathleen.
NEWS
August 11, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane was "on a mission, a mission of revenge," when she orchestrated a "cloak-and-dagger" operation to illegally leak information to vilify a critic, prosecutors said Tuesday in the opening of Kane's trial on perjury and obstruction charges. To the contrary, Kane was a victim grappling with lies from her former second-in-command and a political consultant who have repeatedly covered up their own roles in the leak, her defense argued before the jury in Montgomery County Court in Norristown.
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
Four people were charged Thursday as part of a violent area robbery ring that wore disguises and tortured their victims, federal prosecutors said. Sei Stone, 42, Edwin Robinson, 42, Louis Miller, 38, James Haines, 25, were added to a superseding indictment that includes 16 original defendants allegedly involved in a conspiracy involving kidnapping, home invasions, carjackings, and drug trafficking. The defendants wore police uniforms, badges, bulletproof vests, masks, gloves, and wigs.
NEWS
May 25, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Bill Cosby's sexual-assault case will proceed on a path toward trial as scheduled, after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday rejected his latest attempt to delay it. In a one-line order, the court denied Cosby's request for a stay while it reviewed the charges against him. The ruling removes the last potential roadblock to Tuesday morning's preliminary hearing in Montgomery County Court in Norristown. Cosby's lawyers had asked the Supreme Court to put that proceeding on hold as he sought a rare pretrial appeal.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
A Montgomery County judge on Monday rejected state Attorney General Kathleen Kane's bid to have the criminal case against her dismissed on the ground that she was the victim of selective and "vindictive" prosecution. Judge Wendy Demchick-Alloy said Kane's lawyers had not conformed to proper procedure in filing their motion for dismissal last month. The judge did not offer an opinion on the merits of Kane's assertions but gave her a chance to file an amended motion within 10 days. Kane is facing trial in Montgomery County Court on perjury and other charges.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Police Department's analysts say Rudolph Churchill's DNA is a "match" for that on two items found near the bodies of two North Philadelphia women raped and slain in 1989. A defense DNA expert says match is too imprecise a word, and the best she can say is that Churchill "cannot be excluded" as the person who left that DNA behind 27 years ago. The scientific chasm between those conclusions - and whether the DNA proves beyond a reasonable doubt that Churchill killed Ruby Ellis and Cheryl Hanible - will soon be up to a Philadelphia jury of eight women and four men to bridge.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane made another bid Wednesday to end the looming criminal trial against her, arguing that she was unfairly targeted for a selective and vindictive prosecution. In court filings, Kane's lawyers contended that her political rivals launched the criminal investigation into her alleged grand jury leak in a bid to stop her from releasing embarrassing information about them - including their exchange of racist and pornographic emails on state computers.
NEWS
April 13, 2016
By Michael E. Kraft Most of us recognize the value of science in dealing with complex problems that pose significant risks to public health and well-being. Thus we expect reputable science to be reported and used in helping us make difficult policy choices, such as what to do about climate change. Scientific findings and associated uncertainties should be scrutinized carefully and debated vigorously within the scientific community and among the public. However, denying the best scientific evidence we have could lead to greater societal harm than if we had taken sensible action when reliable knowledge was first available.
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