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NEWS
March 30, 1996 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After myriad faxes, legal jousts, sharp words and a news conference or two, Philadelphia and Florida have ended their war over who will charge Berto Ordaz with murdering his girlfriend and driving the body to a Miami suburb. District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham threw in the towel and said Philadelphia would do it. She authorized city police to issue an arrest warrant for Ordaz, a North Philadelphia man who officials say drove his girlfriend's corpse south to Florida in January and left her body in his van in a Miami suburb.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | by Dave Rachers, Daily News Staff Writer
The judge lost his cool when the prosecutor took a stand. Assistant District Attorney Kelley Marie Dreyer-Spitz was jailed yesterday by Municipal Judge Matthew F. Coppolino after objecting to his allowing a convicted drunken driver to serve his mandatory 30-day jail term on weekends, then refusing to sit down as ordered. "Put her back there [in the cellblock]," shouted Coppolino to a sheriff's deputy yesterday. "She's in contempt of court. " As Dreyer-Spitz was led from the room, Coppolino demanded that her boss be summoned.
NEWS
January 13, 1987 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
After six years as a federal prosecutor in Philadelphia, including three years uprooting corruption in the Police Department, Howard Klein is leaving the U.S. attorney's office. By Friday, Klein will have packed his bags to become a partner in the Center City law firm of Blank, Rome, Comisky and McCauley. "It's time to move on," said Klein, 36, a widely respected prosecutor who has spent the last year as chief of the criminal division supervising 45 trial lawyers for U.S. Attorney Edward S.G. Dennis Jr. Those who got to know him by his work in the U.S. Courthouse - agents, other prosecutors, defense attorneys - say Klein was a talented, aggressive and fair advocate for the government.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
One of prosecutor Brian McMonagle's greatest fans is a man he has put behind bars - twice. Abdul Rasheed, 40, also known as Charles Fields, first became a McMonagle fan a few months ago. That's when McMonagle prosecuted Rasheed for rape and won a conviction and an eight-year jail term. At that time, Rasheed told McMonagle: "I really like you. I want you to do my homicide case. " Since then, McMonagle has been reassigned from the rape division to the homicide unit, and, as fate would have it, he was ordered to try Rasheed for the murder of Thaddeus Garback, 62, on June 22, 1986.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | By Mike Franolich and Tom Torok, Special to The Inquirer
Two armed men in a car in Camden fired at a car carrying Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell last night, but the prosecutor was not injured, according to authorities. Authorities said Asbell apparently returned fire with a shotgun and may have wounded one or both of the assailants after blowing out a passenger window with birdshot. Police last night were seeking two men in a green Toyota Corolla in the incident. Details of the shooting were sketchy last night.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Dianna Marder contributed to this article
Dennis G. Wixted, who recently resigned as first assistant prosecutor for Camden County, will join the Camden law firm of Sufrin & Zucker in about a month, an attorney in the firm said yesterday. Attorney Jeffrey Zucker said plans were being finalized to make Wixted an associate in the firm. Wixted is helping to complete the transition of county prosecutors and is expected to join the law firm in mid-August or early September, Zucker said. "We're looking to expand our practice . . . and Dennis is a real good trial lawyer," Zucker said.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
In an unusual move yesterday, the area's chief federal prosecutor criticized a federal judge for greatly reducing the prison terms of four corrupt former Philadelphia police officers, all members of the notorious Five Squad. U.S. Attorney Michael M. Baylson asked the judge to reconsider his decision. Although acknowledging the court has discretion to reduce prison terms, Baylson said U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer had acted "in error. " Last month the judge said the 15-year prison terms he imposed last year on three of the officers were too harsh, and cut their sentences to five years.
NEWS
May 20, 2008 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Corzine nominated trial lawyer Warren W. Faulk yesterday to become the next Camden County prosecutor, potentially filling a seat that has been vacant for more than two years. If approved by the state Senate, Faulk, 63, would become the county's top law enforcement official, in charge of an office of more than 200 people. The prosecutor also oversees the Camden police. The state attorney general ordered the department's takeover in 2003. "I appreciate the governor's confidence in me," Faulk said yesterday.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | By Ellen O'Brien and Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer John Way Jennings and correspondent Laurie Kalmanson also contributed to this article
Camden County Prosecutor Samuel Asbell's sudden resignation left South Jersey churning yesterday. And as the news spread, the story of his desperate, five-day escapade took on the tone of a morality tale for those who knew and worked with him. Police officials across the county swamped the prosecutor's office telephone lines with commiserating messages after Asbell's resignation was made public, according to First Assistant Prosecutor Dennis G....
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Two law school classmates of Richard Barbour, the Burlington County assistant prosecutor killed in April at a Society Hill cash machine, have started a memorial fund in his name at the Rutgers School of Law in Camden. "After the wake, I knew we would have to do something," said Peter Cuddihy, who, along with Ruth Rifkin, has organized the effort to establish a memorial fund. "Rick was the type of person who merited that. " The award will be given out annually at the law school's commencement to a student who plans to work in a prosecutor's or district attorney's office, said Cuddihy, a lawyer in private practice who graduated with Barbour in 1989.
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NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a courtroom exchange worthy of prime-time TV, a Bucks County prosecutor on Wednesday pummeled Don Tollefson with questions about why his charity paid for his home's lawn care, a trip to the dentist, and his dogs' grooming. The former sportscaster, on trial for fraud, gave an explanation for every expense and at one point accused prosecutor Matt Weintraub of rolling his eyes at the answers. Tollefson contended that he was reimbursing himself after using his personal bank account to cover costs for his Winning Ways charity, which helps poor children.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The special prosecutor investigating Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane subpoenaed two Inquirer reporters Monday in a bid to learn their sources for a story that said a grand jury had recommended criminal charges against her. The newspaper's editor said the reporters would invoke the state Shield Law, which offers legal protection against the compelled identification of confidential sources. "The confidential sources who provided guidance to The Inquirer in these stories about public officials in their official duties are precisely those whom the Pennsylvania Shield Law was designed to protect from disclosure," editor William K. Marimow said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
EX-TV SPORTS anchor Don Tollefson said there is nothing untoward about the five-figure money-wire transfers from his charity bank account to his personal bank account - because that money was spent to make kids happy. A Bucks County prosecutor spent the better part of yesterday afternoon dissecting Tollefson's personal bank account as well as those of his charities on the third day of his trial on theft by deception charges. Records show Tollefson would accept donations and, soon after, transfer some or part of them into his or his wife's personal bank account - as much as $50,000 one time.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A SPECIAL PROSECUTOR'S secret grand-jury conclusion about an allegation that state Attorney General Kathleen Kane disclosed secret grand-jury information was leaked to the press yesterday. According to a report in the Inquirer , the grand jury now recommends the filing of criminal charges against Kane for spilling information and recommends charging her with perjury and contempt of court. Kane, 48, is accused of violating the cardinal rule of investigating grand juries - to keep matters confidential unless or until a prosecutor takes action.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was an unusual situation - a prosecutor explaining why she wasn't bringing charges. But Kathleen Kane seemed supremely confident. In the spring, in forum after forum, Kane, Pennsylvania's attorney general, said an undercover sting investigation that implicated five Philadelphia officials was marred by possible racial targeting, among many other flaws. Kane said she knew this because one of her top aides had heard it directly from the sting's case agent. And she said she had contemporaneous interview notes and an affidavit to to back it up. As it turned out, she didn't.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the end of last week, Joe O'Brien was reeling. It took O'Brien, the executive director of the Chester County Intermediate Unit, a few days to wade through the long-awaited 111-page grand jury report that described mismanagement, unethical behavior, and theft of student funds at the Coatesville Area School District. "It was painful," O'Brien said Friday. The release of the report by county prosecutors Monday capped an 18-month investigation that culminated in the arrests of Richard Como, a former superintendent, and former athletic director Jim Donato on misappropriation of funds and other charges.
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge on Friday granted permission for Chaka Fattah Jr. to represent himself in a tax and bank fraud case that could send him to prison for life if he is convicted. U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III agreed to allow Fattah, son of U.S. Rep Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.), to be his own lawyer. Before ruling, Bartle carefully instructed Fattah, 32, on each of the criminal charges he faced and added that the case carries a maximum penalty of 418 years in prison and $12.4 million in fines.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A witness expected to play a key role in a Bucks County murder trial has been charged with lying to prosecutors, a potential blow to a case that took eight years to bring to court. Kyle Page, 29, of Levittown, testified on three occasions that he watched his cousin Ckaron Handy shoot and kill 30-year-old Kevin Battista in a botched Levittown drug deal in 2006, according to court documents. But in an affidavit dated Friday, police said that Page was in prison when the shooting occurred, and that Page admitted his false testimony last month in two letters to Christopher Rees, a deputy district attorney.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, which handles more than 5,000 cases a year, lost about one-sixth of its staff last year when its salary scale was the lowest in the state. But a new contract signed last month brought a "huge boost to morale" and hiring is now underway, according to First Assistant Prosecutor Raymond Milavsky. Last year, six of the 32 full-time assistant prosecutors left, mostly because they were offered better-paying jobs at other prosecutors' offices, or with the state or law firms, Milavsky said.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
T O PARAPHRASE an old saying, a grand jury would have indicted a ham sandwich in the July 17 chokehold death of Eric Garner in New York's Staten Island. But a ham sandwich was not accused of grabbing Garner from behind, squeezing his neck and taking him to the ground as he used his last words to repeat, "I can't breathe. " New York City Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo was accused of that act, and the fact that a grand jury yesterday declined to indict him came as no surprise to seasoned Philadelphia lawyers.
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