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Prospero

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
From the very beginning, the production of The Tempest by the Lantern Theater establishes that the play belongs to Prospero. Before the first scene's storm, we see Prospero sitting on a sort of natural throne built into the top of the hill suggested by Nick Embree's earthy, vine-covered set. From his perch, Prospero looms over the compact St. Stephen's Theater playing area, providing a strong visual reminder that nothing will occur in the play...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
During the fearsome storm that sets the events of Shakespeare's The Tempest in motion, the new production at the Broadhurst Theatre suggests the raging sea with yards of billowing blue fabric deployed by a quartet of stilt- walkers. And off to one side, holding a script and fully visible to the audience, an actor rattles the sheet of pliable metal that simulates thunder. Thus we're immediately alerted to how director George C. Wolfe will relate the story of Prospero, the exiled duke of Milan, and the old enemies the duke has caused to be shipwrecked on his magical island.
NEWS
March 29, 2006
A March 24 letter, "Where he belongs," by Nikola Sizgorich included an incorrect e-mail address for the writer. Sizgorich does not want her e-mail address published. Yesterday's Commentary page contained incorrect information about a column's author. Mark Franek's Web page address is http://webclass.penncharter.com/prospero/.
NEWS
July 25, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pastorius Park in Chestnut Hill is a lovely setting for the productions of the company known as Shakespeare in the Park. The sloping terrain around the park's languid waterway, contained and crossed by picturesque stone walls and bridges, provides both a natural amphitheater and a delightful place to spend a couple of hours on a summer evening. On one hand, the relaxing, sylvan ambience of the park enhances the gentle, romantic, humorous aspects of The Tempest, the company's current Shakespeare presentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1994 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Eric Hill perceives Shakespeare's The Tempest as taking place in the mind of Prospero. The primary character imagines everything about the play - even, in a way, himself. Hill's Temple University Theaters' production opens with Miranda, Prospero's daughter, lying on the stage reading a magazine and listening to rock music, a Princess phone at her side. Prospero, who is on stage virtually throughout the play, spends a great deal of time in his overstuffed chair, which if it is not contemporary, is at least 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | By Clifford A. Ridley, Inquirer Theater Critic
Stagecraft is the star of La Tempestad, the adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest that runs at the Zellerbach Theater through tomorrow. But even a star requires a bit more support than this interesting but somewhat schizophrenic production provides. The creation of Venezuela's Compania Rajatabla, La Tempestad is performed in Spanish with simultaneous translation, available through headphones. This reviewer used the translation. It would have been better if he spoke Spanish, but then it also would have been better if the production spoke Shakespeare.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1995 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Great ideas come in pairs, don't they? With Mettawee River Theatre Company's production of Shakespeare's The Tempest - including puppets - you might argue they've scooped George C. Wolfe's Tempest, the current Shakespeare in the Park offering in New York with puppets in the supporting cast. But surprisingly, given that the Mettawee River performers staged the show Thursday for the week-long Puppeteers of America Festival in Bryn Mawr, their use of puppetry was quite restrained, confined to only two scenes in the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
No thunder and lightning, no alarums and hullabaloo attend the conjured shipwreck at the start of Shakespeare's valedictory masterpiece, The Tempest, in the revelatory Arden Theatre Company production that opened Tuesday for a month-long run. No shipwreck, in fact, is set before us - just a toy schooner, bobbing high above Hiroshi Iwasaki's draped and platformed set, that crosses from right to left until it is gently, silently plucked from its...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1992 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Actors From the London Stage - the group presenting The Tempest at the Annenberg Center - believe, according to a program note, in the "power of Shakespeare's words in performance, and in the rich possibilities created by the imaginations of a participating audience. " To that end, the troupe, which has been visiting here regularly for several years, presents Shakespeare with no sets, no costumes, rudimentary stage lighting, a prop here and there, and five actors doubling and tripling in roles.
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
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NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Jim Rutter and FOR THE INQUIRER
Strong acting and bold direction too often overshadow the work that a design team contributes to a play's success. In the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival's staging of The Tempest, the designers provide all the elements that make this production memorable. Not that the actors and director Jim Helsinger don't uphold the Festival's high standards. Greg Wood delivers a compelling, sympathetic performance as Prospero, the deposed Duke of Milan exiled for 15 years on a remote island with his daughter Miranda (the earnest and endearing Kelsey Formost)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - The Metropolitan Opera spent so much time and money assembling an operatic adaptation of The Tempest , you wonder why it didn't just commission a composer to write a new one. Well, Thomas Adès did that not long ago. Instead, the Met cobbled together its latest premiere, The Enchanted Island , from existing arias by Handel, Vivaldi, and others - guaranteeing delivery on the operatic basics: fine, voice-friendly music; stars to...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some cineasts snickered when news broke that Shakespearean artist Kenneth Branagh planned to bring Marvel Comics' Thor to the big screen. He did, and the result is fantastic. Branagh's literate adaptation features incredible special effects and a stellar cast, including Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Tom Hiddleston, and Anthony Hopkins. Prolific Swedish character actor Stellan Skarsgård also costars, as an astrophysicist who is helping his student (Portman) in her research - a quest that leads them to Thor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It figures that Julie Taymor, theater magician of The Lion King , film conjurer of Across the Universe , Shakespeare interpreter who made her movie debut with Titus , would be drawn to The Tempest , the one about the sorcerer who unsettles the seas before settling scores. Boldly Taymor changes Prospero's gender, casting the magnificent Helen Mirren as Prospera, cast away with her daughter, Miranda, on a remote island where the sorceress rescues the sprite Ariel and enslaves the creature Caliban.
NEWS
September 10, 2010
Easy A High schooler Emma Stone pretends to lose her virginity - and helps other teens do the same. (Friday) Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps A stockbroker (Shia LaBeouf) gets embroiled with disgraced financier Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) and engaged to his daughter (Carey Mulligan). (Sept. 24) It's Kind of a Funny Story The team behind Sugar and Half Nelson adapts Ned Vizzini's novel about a teenager struggling with depression - and love. (Oct. 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Opera audiences here seem to converge from different decades, whether they're dowagers unchanged since the 1950s, sun-baked disco bunnies from the 1980s, or the tattooed-and-pierced 21st-century set. How well the Santa Fe Opera serves this patchwork constituency is an annual source of curiosity that draws artistic directors from Philadelphia to Seattle. And that's why any given season here is an operatic crystal ball for much of the rest of the country. This year, the diva worshipers won the durable, oft-venerated mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter in the title role of Carmen (through Aug. 26)
NEWS
March 29, 2006
A March 24 letter, "Where he belongs," by Nikola Sizgorich included an incorrect e-mail address for the writer. Sizgorich does not want her e-mail address published. Yesterday's Commentary page contained incorrect information about a column's author. Mark Franek's Web page address is http://webclass.penncharter.com/prospero/.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
From the very beginning, the production of The Tempest by the Lantern Theater establishes that the play belongs to Prospero. Before the first scene's storm, we see Prospero sitting on a sort of natural throne built into the top of the hill suggested by Nick Embree's earthy, vine-covered set. From his perch, Prospero looms over the compact St. Stephen's Theater playing area, providing a strong visual reminder that nothing will occur in the play...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At 93, the Portuguese director Manoel de Oliveira may be the oldest filmmaker still plying his art. His minimalist, incomparably moving I'm Going Home ranks with John Huston's The Dead as one of the great works by a director at his twilight. For those familiar with the work of the often-impenetrable Portuguese eccentric, know that this is an unusually accessible movie - if you can survive its first 10 minutes. No surprise that I'm Going Home - which stars the formidable French actor Michel Piccoli -is about a Paris theatrical legend contemplating his final bow. Call it Portrait of the Artist as an Old Man. When first we see Gilbert Valence (Piccoli)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The Tempest takes place on a mysterious island presided over by a puissant magician, and it is the strength of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival production of the play that the sense of place and character are established at the outset and maintained throughout. The storm and shipwreck that begin the play are impressively staged, and when the winds die, Prospero, the magician-ruler of the island who conjured the tempest, is revealed standing imperiously above everything, framed dramatically against a backdrop of craggy peaks.
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