FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 19, 2002 | By Clay W. Hamlin 3d
Retired Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf, diagnosed with prostate cancer, said it best: "You cannot sit back and do nothing because you'll never have perfect intelligence on the enemy. ... Get on with it. " Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in American men. It's curable if diagnosed early; if not, there's presently no cure. Early detection is the key. More than 30,000 will die from the disease this year alone. One out of every 18 of those deaths will come to a Pennsylvania resident - ranking the state fifth in the number of both cases and deaths.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Robert Langreth, Bloomberg News
Only 10 percent of men treated for early prostate cancer could sustain an erection sufficient for sex 15 years later, according to a study that found impotence rates were the same whether treatment was surgery or radiation. The findings were produced by the longest and broadest look at quality-of-life outcomes in two common therapies for prostate cancer. Researchers repeatedly surveyed 1,655 men diagnosed with localized disease and given surgery or external beam radiation. While surgery patients had higher impotence rates two years after treatment, by 15 years erection failure "was nearly universal" with both treatments, according to the study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
November 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I recently had a prostate biopsy, which showed a small area of cancer. My urologist discussed the option of close surveillance, with periodic biopsies and regular PSA blood testing. I'm 65 years old and otherwise in great health. Do you think it's better to treat the cancer or just watch it? Answer: In the case of early prostate cancer like you have, "active surveillance" is a reasonable approach. The downsides are the uncertainty of the disease course and the anxiety of living with prostate cancer.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In rejecting PSA screening for prostate cancer, an influential federal panel has chipped a cornerstone of preventive medicine, declaring that it's not always best to catch cancer as early as possible. "At best, PSA screening may help only 1 man in 1,000 avoid death from prostate cancer," the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said Monday. "Most prostate cancers found by PSA screening are slow growing, not life threatening, and will not cause a man any harm during his lifetime.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Gardiner Harris, New York Times News Service
Healthy men should no longer receive a PSA blood test to screen for prostate cancer because the test does not save lives over all and often leads to more tests and treatments that needlessly cause pain, impotence, and incontinence in many, a key government health panel concluded. The recommendation, by the United States Preventive Services Task Force and due for official release early next week, is based on the results of five well-controlled clinical trials and could substantially change the care given to men 50 and older.
SPORTS
April 4, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - The Lehigh Valley IronPigs are truly No. 1 when it comes to the adventurous new world of urinal gaming. The IronPigs have created a video game that has what they call the "only truly hands-free urinal game controller. " It doesn't take much to be a whiz at this game, which is featured in the men's restrooms at Coca-Cola Park. The new game likely won't hurt the sales of beverages, since the extra fluids will give the participants staying power. "These games are sure to make a huge splash," quipped IronPigs general manager Kurt Landes, who has labeled them "The X-Stream Games.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
Terry Dyroff's PSA blood test led to a prostate biopsy that didn't find cancer but gave him a life-threatening infection. In the emergency room several days later, "I didn't sit, I just laid on the floor, I felt so bad," said Dyroff, 65, a retired professor from Silver Spring, Md. "I honestly thought I might be dying. " Donald Weaver was a healthy 74-year-old Kansas farmer until doctors went looking for prostate cancer. A PSA test led to a biopsy and surgery, then a heart attack, organ failure, and coma.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist who died of brain cancer sued the university Tuesday, alleging that the school bore responsibility for his death by failing to protect him from laboratory radiation. The family of Jeffrey H. Ware further alleged that Penn physicians enrolled him in a study without proper consent, treating his gliosarcoma with still more radiation, thereby subjecting him to painful side effects long after there was any hope of recovery. Ware, who died in October 2011 at age 47, lived in Haddonfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By Jay Price, McClatchy Newspapers
DURHAM, N.C. - A good set of headphones and a little Bach may ease the pain and anxiety of getting a prostate biopsy, according to a newly published study by Duke Cancer Institute researchers. That could be music to the ears of the 700,000 American men who each year get the often-uncomfortable procedure, regarded as the only reliable diagnostic test for prostate cancer. Results of the study were published this month in the journal Urology. Researchers enrolled 88 patients and randomly assigned each to one of three groups.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
PROSTATE-CANCER DRUG. The Food and Drug Administration has approved use of a hormone-blocking drug to help slow the progress of prostate cancer and improve the lives of its victims. The drug, flutamide, will be sold by Schering-Plough Corp. under the name Eulexin. The FDA said a recent National Cancer Institute study found that patients taking both flutamide and leuprolide - a drug already on the U.S. market under the name Lupron - survived an average of 34.9 months, or nearly 25 percent, longer than patients taking leuprolide alone.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Milken, the long-retired 1980s junk-bond king and now big-time prostate cancer philanthropist, blew into the Wanamaker's Crystal Tea Room on Tuesday evening for one of the city's bigger and faster-growing charitable events. He jets around the nation to about 100 of these events a year, flying into Philadelphia on Tuesday from Dallas and planning to immediately depart Philadelphia for Washington. "I see light at the end of the tunnel," Milken said of cancer cures, adding that he believed philanthropists like those in Philadelphia had to support young scientists as the federal government has curtailed medical-research funding in recent years.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade after prostate cancer became the economic driver behind proton beam therapy in the U.S., it still isn't clear that men treated with the technology do better than those who get less costly radiation treatments. That's why expert groups have recently advised against insurance coverage of proton therapy for prostate cancer - and why some private plans are refusing to pay for it. The Catch-22 is that this pullback is hampering a clinical trial co-led by the University of Pennsylvania that would finally settle the question of superiority.
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristine Warner wanted an eye-catching way to encourage men to talk to their doctors about the complicated, controversial subject of prostate cancer screening. Don't Fear The Finger campaign was born. Go ahead and snicker. It got your attention. The finger in question, of course, is the one a physician puts up a man's rectum to feel for cancer in his prostate gland. The rectal exam is usually paired with a PSA blood test. Warner, a graphic designer, former lobbyist, and urologist's daughter, is the volunteer director of the Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist who died of brain cancer sued the university Tuesday, alleging that the school bore responsibility for his death by failing to protect him from laboratory radiation. The family of Jeffrey H. Ware further alleged that Penn physicians enrolled him in a study without proper consent, treating his gliosarcoma with still more radiation, thereby subjecting him to painful side effects long after there was any hope of recovery. Ware, who died in October 2011 at age 47, lived in Haddonfield.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after lumpectomy became a standard option for women with breast cancer, men are seeking a similarly targeted approach to prostate cancer, one that gets rid of the tumor while preserving the organ. This sensible tack has lagged in prostate cancer for many reasons, starting with the fact that the golf-ball-size gland is inaccessible. It lies deep within the pelvic cavity, surrounded by sensitive structures that are vital to sexual and urinary health. Now, however, an array of technologies is enabling doctors to visualize and zap away prostate malignancies.
NEWS
August 11, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holy mackerel! Or, in light of a new study, "unholy" might be more appropriate. Omega-3 fatty acids derived from oil in fatty fish like mackerel, tuna, and salmon are still endorsed by doctors for controlling blood fats in heart disease. But when it comes to preventing cancer, the verdict has gotten murky. A study published in July found omega-3 may raise the risk of prostate cancer. "This is not a happy finding," said Theodore Brasky, who led the study at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2013
In the Region Campbell buys Danish cookie-maker Campbell Soup Co. said it reached an agreement to buy the maker of the popular Royal Dansk Danish butter cookies sold in round blue tins. The price the Camden company agreed to pay for Kelsen Group A/S , which is based in Nørre Snede, Denmark, and sells cookies in 85 countries, was not disclosed. Kelsen had $180 million in net sales last year and employs 366, Campbell said. Highlighting Kelsen's presence in China, Campbell's chief executive Denise Morrison said in a news release that the deal would help Campbell toward its goal of reaching "new consumers through expansion into higher-growth spaces, including fast-growing emerging markets.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press
A new genetic test to gauge the aggressiveness of prostate cancer may help tens of thousands of men each year decide whether they need to treat their cancer right away or can safely monitor it. The new test, which goes on sale Wednesday, joins another one that recently came on the market. Both analyze multiple genes in a biopsy sample and give a score for aggressiveness, similar to tests used now for certain breast and colon cancers. Doctors say tests like these have the potential to curb a major problem in cancer care - overtreatment.
SPORTS
April 4, 2013 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
ALLENTOWN - The Lehigh Valley IronPigs are truly No. 1 when it comes to the adventurous new world of urinal gaming. The IronPigs have created a video game that has what they call the "only truly hands-free urinal game controller. " It doesn't take much to be a whiz at this game, which is featured in the men's restrooms at Coca-Cola Park. The new game likely won't hurt the sales of beverages, since the extra fluids will give the participants staying power. "These games are sure to make a huge splash," quipped IronPigs general manager Kurt Landes, who has labeled them "The X-Stream Games.
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